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32

Yes, you have to be rooted. To get rooted, see this question: How do I root my device? One of the easiest ways to uninstall system apps after rooting is to use Titanium Backup. You can just click an app and choose Uninstall. Note: Be careful what you remove! You might want to use Titanium to back them up before you remove them, in case it makes your ...


31

In the realm of the ARM chipsets which is the common factor, the entire Android stack, from the near-identical kernel based on Linux, are in fact, 32bit, cross-compiled from usually either a 32bit/64bit host environment, the host environment is usually one of the distributions of Linux. Recommended distribution, by Google, for building and cross-compiling ...


18

No, that is impossible -- as only root can make the system partition writable (which is required to delete a system app, which is stored there). However, using ICS (Android 4.0) or above, you can at least "freeze" them (make it "invisible and unusable") -- and, if you later decide otherwise, also unfreeze them again (see e.g. How to Remove / Disable the ...


15

You can't remove them without root, they're installed to a directory that cannot be accessed without root. However, you can do the next best thing, close your eyes, stick your fingers in your ears, and go la-la-la-la, pretending they don't exist. The way to do this is to get a launcher (such as ADW if memory serves), that allows you to hide icons. In that ...


11

I assume that you mean on the graph you get if you go to Settings -> About Phone -> Battery Use and tap the graph at the top? I have a signal strength line there, under the battery level graph that has many colours in it that's labelled "Phone Signal" on my device. (full size) The reason it's there is that your signal strength can have a big effect on your ...


8

Yes, you actually can do this. It's kind of kludgy looking when you inspect the clipboard, but it works just fine. First off, you can inspect the current clipboard contents with service call clipboard 1 from an adb shell (or, without shelling in first, adb shell service call clipboard 1). It may start out initially blank after a reboot, for example: # ...


8

Here's a great article someone wrote on the effect of changing it, very detailed: http://ryanolson.wordpress.com/2010/07/13/test-how-changing-the-max-amount-of-memory-per-vm-heap-can-effect-your-rom-cyanogen/ In short, with the G1, it can cause bigger applications to crash. I would just recommend you keep it default or find a value that you do not see any ...


7

You may also use ADB to remove applications, but the application methods are easier. Since use of ADB does not require a market, this will work for users who are rooted but who cannot or do not wish to use Android market or similar marketplaces. ./adb remount #ROOT IS REQUIRED TO REMOUNT /system read-write ./adb shell cd /system/app To see what's ...


7

Android does support symbolic links, but certain file systems (e.g. FAT or RFS) does not and you cannot create symbolic links in those partitions. If your device uses a filesystem that supports symbolic links (e.g. ext2, ext3, ext4, yaffs2) then you should be able to use ln -s from the Terminal Emulator.


7

I agree with Izzy's answer mostly, however technically it is possible to do so without. Background: System apps reside at /system/app/* /system is a separate partition that is mounted read-only during normal use Some phones (HTC) even lock the flash partition to disallow any write Normally one gains root on the normal system to make /system writeable and ...


6

It appears to be defined in /init.rc, at least on my device: export PATH /sbin:/system/sbin:/system/bin:/system/xbin I don't think you can edit this file directly though, even with root access, because it is part of the read-only boot image, not the /system partition. If you want to edit it then I guess you would have to unpack, edit and re-pack the boot ...


6

The setting you are looking for is, most likely, found in Settings → Development (might be called "Developer options"; I know on some ROMs this option is initially hidden -- but if it's hidden in your case, it would be funny how that CPU overlay was activated). Scroll down a bit there, and you should find the "Monitoring" section -- where you probably ...


5

The other answers are correct, but fail to point out a couple differences: Permissions System apps are granted the ability to request certain system-only permissions that are never available to user apps. This is not the same as root/sudo/su permissions. One example that I know of and use daily is the ability to reset the missed call notification ...


5

There are several ways to collect this type of information, I'll be speaking about two that I use on a daily basis as to oversee what's going on with my devices: Terminal Using a terminal application, you are able to run Linux commands like top or ps that provide information about the currently running processes: ps ps (i.e., process status) ...


4

I think this question on superuser answers your question, i.e. that the FAT filesystem on the SD card does not support symlinks. Just to clarify (and as reflected in the SU question/answers I linked): the Android OS supports symlinks, but the FAT filesystem on the SD card does not.


4

All ARM chips are currently 32-bit. Because of this, Android currently executes all code in a 32-bit environment. 64-bit processors set to launch in 2014.


3

I would personally use ES File Explorer to get the original build.prop back into your /system partition. You have to go into the app options and select "mount system read write" and it will be able to write to the /system partition. The commands for mounting the partition and copying the old build.prop from the root of your sdcard are: $su #mount -ro ...


3

The easiest way to do this is probably to use Titanium Backup. If you long press on a system app in the list it will give you the option to "Convert to user app". Conversely, you can long press on a user app and "Convert to system app" as well. Note, though, that some system apps will not function well as user apps because their permissions may be ...


3

Nothing about storing an app in /system/app/ makes the app special. That location is read-only without root so it prevents uninstalling applications, that's all. So applications that are critical are put there so that they can't be uninstalled. Carrier bloatware that they don't want to let you remove is also put there. The latter category of apps can be ...


3

Many events are already logged to the system log on an Android devices. Apps such as Log Collector can be used to access the log (it allows you to email or SMS the log). The log data is extensive, and sometimes cryptic, so be prepared to spend some time sifting through it. You may be surprised as what you find ... I was able to learn that my wifi ...


3

Yes, you have to root your phone in order to remove preinstalled apps. See these questions here and here. Before you remove any applications, MAKE SURE YOU MAKE A BACKUP via Nandroid. You may delete an app that the system relies on (for one reason or other). Do some searching and make sure it is safe to remove the apps you want to remove.


3

Is Android a 32- or 64- bit OS? I assume that it is one or another and not both, as that would force both 32- and 64-bit binaries to be hosted on Google Play. Neither actually. Android is a Dalvik VM-based OS, and Google Play hosts Dalvik applications. Dalvik VM itself, like Java VM, is always 32-bit regardless of the bitness of the physical machine. ...


3

You can never "choose" per-se an app and dictate that the app will have that guaranteed amount of memory. Sure, Google Maps consume space, but that's for the actual application, does not mean its hogging up memory, Android is pretty smart when it comes to memory management. When you long press the home key, it shows the recent apps list, that does not ...


3

It's not possible to flash Android on a Symbian phone right now. However, you could make Google apps work on a Symbian phone. This guide can give you an idea how to do it. Or if it's just the Android theme / look-and-feel you want, you can take a look at SPB Mobile Shell. Edit #1: It's probably possible to port Android to a Symbian phone. But so far, ...


3

Within the BatteryManager documentation for Android there is a constant that can be used to check against that is named BATTERY_HEALTH_OVERHEAT. This would lead me to assume that there is a check that the OS does against this value, though I have never personally experienced a warning like this. I did on my old iPad, but being a recent Android convert I ...


2

The video codecs are limited to what is supported by the device. This suggests that the codecs are in firmware and not software codecs like you are used to on the computer. This means you will probably need to use something like Handbrake to convert your videos to the phone. Unless there are in the h264 or 3GP formats that all android phones support. ...


2

No you can't remove the pre-installed applications without rooting the phone first. Am I right in saying it's a I9100 Galaxy SII? The exact model number should show on first startup, you can google that number and see if a root exists. As Samsung ships a few phones for different countries with different internal model numbers. Once the phone is rooted, ...


2

If you have a phone with low memory (like the G1) and spend your day switching between a couple little applications, then lowering this number will speed up your system and allow more programs to stay loaded up, making switching faster. If you have heavy weight applications (such as the FB app!) that can't get their jobs done inside the limit you set, they ...


2

Found these instructions to install PowerManagerPro into /system/app, just modified them a little. (Note: first install the app into /data/app, like you would any app, and you need a rooted device.) Open a Terminal Emulator app and execute the following command to copy the application to the sdcard: su cp /data/app/your.apk /sdcard/your.apk If ...


2

System apps are apps that are included within the system. They are located in the /system/app folder. The vast majority of them are required to make the device run. An example of some of these are the dialer, which sets up all the network connectivity, and browser, without which no in-app webviews would work.



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