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68

See this http://geekfor.me/faq/you-shouldnt-be-using-a-task-killer-with-android/ FAQ: Why You Shouldn’t Be Using a Task Killer with Android (geekfor.me) - xda-developers tl;dr version: Android is hard coded to automatically kill a task when more memory is needed. Android is hard coded to automatically kill a task when it’s done doing what it ...


15

No, and even more so with the latest 2.2 versions of Android. I used to use them, but I've stopped and everything has been better since I stopped using a task manager/killer. There is an app called Watchdog if you'd like to be notified about a process using a ton of CPU for a long period of time, which then will give you the option to kill that run-away ...


12

I usually get by the day by carrying a USB charger since I always have my laptop or other computers around me. Some people get through by buying a second battery pack or a thick extended battery. Any apps that syncs every 15 minutes is battery sucker, since it prevents the phone from sleeping. Syncing every hour or so shouldn't affect battery by much. If ...


11

Closing the browser has no benefit. The android subsystem manages the memory on the device really well and will free up memory from background applications if it needs it. As I understand it, it does this by saving the application state in a database on disk. If you run the application again, it can then rebuild its state from the info in the database. If ...


8

Watchdog will monitor your phone's performance and alert you of issues. Here's a quote from the Lifehacker article on Watchdog. Watchdog runs in the background, watching for apps to start using more than a certain percentage of CPU power that you specify (with a default of 80 percent). When it notices an app going out of bounds, it notifies you ...


8

The people over at XDA-developers.com will tell you: you don't need a task killer! Why? Well you see RAM only uses up energy when you change what's in it, so actually the act of 'cleaning' up costs you more than keeping it in memory. The only apps I would recommend closing are those that require internet access and/or sync often. This includes various ...


8

There are two apps, Juice Defender and Woofi, which, when used together can dramatically increase the battery life of your phone. The idea is that if you don't need to be notified the instant that you receive a message via the internet, your mobile data doesn't need to be on all the time. Juice Defender (among other things) will disable your mobile internet, ...


8

Task Killers do generally "work" in that they kill tasks. They don't "work" in that most apps that you'd want to kill due to running constantly will simply be restarted by the OS, and Android already has appropriate task management built in. A task manager will mostly just drain your battery and waste your time. See also: How can I stop applications and ...


6

Biggest battery-killer for me is being in a place with little or no cell signal and having the cell antenna on. The phone is constantly trying to connect with the network and it just sucks the battery dry. When I'm at work I can't get any signal in my office, so I put the thing in Airplane mode. (I can't make or receive calls anyway, so might as well.) I ...


6

Yes. You should have a task-killer app, but not for the reasons you think. I've had runaway processes (maybe watchdog can help) like google maps which then ran twice, once to kill my cpu/ram and once to actually work. I had to use the task killer to kill both instances and then run the normal one. RARELY will you actually need to manually kill anything. ...


6

You don't need to, by default Android will automatically terminate applications that haven't been used for a long time when another application needs the used memory. Android prolongs the life of applications, so that when you return to the applications, it will already be in the memory (this improves responsiveness); but applications whose life is ...


6

Though there are apps around that would answer to your request (so-called "Task-killers" and "Memory boosters"), their usage is not to recommend -- simply because it would not help any (see Is it advisable to run a task killer app on Android). If those background processes are designed as services, they would simply restart - as would many other apps as ...


5

Long pressing on the home button will bring up the six most recently accessed apps and you can switch them. How many stay in the memory depends on your phone and the size off the app. Android keeps all opened apps in the memory until it needs space. There are countless apps that show what apps are running in your memory. Search the market for "app manager" ...


5

In Linux/Android it is not recommended to close apps or use task killers. Unlike a Windows computer/phone, Linux/Android can keep applications "running" in the background which doesn't use any CPU or networking (unless it's a media player). It has actually been proven that closing apps causes more battery drain, because instead of Android being able to ...


4

I agree with the general position that they are unnecessary, however I have recently come to the conclusion, based on personal experience that it depends which version of Android you are running. Let me explain... I used to use a Task Killer on my Droid but stopped after I started seeing more and more people explaining why they don't actually work (see the ...


4

Sounds like OS Monitor might do what you want. I believe it just uses the top utility to get process info. Screenshot: And note that tapping on one of the rows will expand it to show info like memory use, priority, and so forth.


3

If you want to free the memory used by the Browser, just close all open tabs/windows: Menu > Windows > Press the X buttons. It would be nice if Browser has the ability to save and restore tabs/windows, like every modern desktop browsers have; however currently there is no such thing, therefore killing the Browser means losing whatever you're doing in ...


3

Calendar depends on Calendar Storage; Handcent still relies on the device's services for receiving messages; and I would guess that even if Winamp doesn't rely on Media, your wallpaper or notification sounds or something else does. I would mostly leave these "System" services alone. If you have battery trouble, it's likely due to user-installed apps.


3

ReChild's app is called Advanced Task Killer and there is very little reason for you to use it. In most cases, using a task killer will hurt the performance of your device. Android is not like Microsoft Windows. It is designed to keep the devices memory filled and to manage that memory on demand, killing apps only when more memory is demanded. If you ...


3

Not sure which task manager you are using -- but some devices/Android versions distinguish running apps from services. On my Droid2 running Gingerbread, I find running apps at Apps->Apps in the "Running" Tab, while services show up at Apps->Active Services. Parts of Google Maps (which is the navigation app you probably refer to) are implemented as services, ...


3

Your suggested approach would have the same result: a few seconds later, the app would be back. Tasker kills it again. Start at the beginning. This vicious circle will certainly help you drain your battery faster -- but nothing else. Two possible solutions would include either to uninstrall the app, or to disable the "listener" it established to get started ...


3

As I've read in different places: Freezing apps does not necessarily mean their services won't be running anymore. It seems even frozen apps are able to react on broadcasts, so freezing alone won't solve the issue. Reference: If the app you freeze is sending the intent, then no the intent will no longer happen. But if the app is receiving intents, then yes ...


3

The apps you see when long-pressing the "Home" button (or with newer devices, the "MultiTask" button with the two rectangles) are not the "currently active", but the "recently used" apps. With Android 4.0 and higher, you can simply swipe them out of that list -- which will not only remove them from the list, but also "kindly ask them" to close themselves. ...


3

While this might appear to temporarily "speed up" your device, this kind of "Chuck Norris Roundhouse Kick" is rather contra-productive for the system, especially for two things: your battery load time to access one of the killed apps again Android usually does a good job managing ram. But some apps sometimes make it hard to do so (mostly by not behaving ...


2

SeePU is another app that will monitor your phone's CPU, memory and network usage. From Lifehacker's artcile on SeePU: SeePU puts monitoring meters in your Android phone's notification area. You can monitor the CPU usage, RAM usage, and network activity. You can adjust the frequency the monitor is updated, how the data is displayed—just CPU or ...


2

This comprehensive, informative & easily readible article entitled "Android Task Killers Explained: What They Do and Why You Shouldn’t Use Them" will provide you with a quick overview of how Android handles process management on its own fairly well by default. (Essentially that a Task Manager/ Killer App is not required- it was more useful in early ...


2

When I was running Froyo, I installed task manager not to kill tasks, but to find an easy to review list of what is running and learn more about how apps work. This seemed the easiest way to learn what was running quickly. Now that I have Gingerbread, I just use the "running" list under applications in the settings menu.


2

As Matt mentions, you can long-press the home button to see the 6 or 8 most recent apps. I've also seen Itching Thumb suggested here before. As Matt also mentions, there are task manager apps. One is Advanced Task Killer (or Advanced Task Killer Froyo even) which can be configured to switch to the open app rather than killing it. BTW, if you search for ...


2

First, see my relevant answer over here in regards to "killing tasks", especially the use of task killers. The only way to stop these background tasks is to either: Turn off any sort of background notifications the app does (check the settings for each app) Uninstall the app or if you are rooted, you could "freeze" it with Titanium Backup. Beyond that, ...



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