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13

am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -c android.intent.category.HOME More info about shell commands: an archived version of the AndroidWiki page


12

These free apps in the Market claim to be able to display your logcat, and don't make any mention of root. Should only take you a few minutes to try them out: CatLog aLogcat LogViewer EDIT: Thanks to @mente for reminding me that these apps will only let you view the full logfile in older versions of Android. Android 4.1 brought in a new security model ...


11

Android System Info is a free app from the market which will tell you more details about your phone than you ever wanted to know. It has all the details you want about your CPU and Memory and much much more. Install it, start the app and check the System tab for all the information you are looking for.


9

Using adb, I believe it is possible: am [start|instrument] am start [-a <action>] [-d <data_uri>] [-t <mime_type>] [-c <category> [-c <category>] ...] [-e <extra_key> <extra_value> [-e <extra_key> <extra_value> ...] [-n <component>] [-D] [<uri>] am instrument [-e <arg_name> ...


7

Like Sachin Shekhar said, you must use the following command : am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -n <package_name>/<full_class_name> See a concrete example : getting the apk file from your Android device or any Market places running this command : aapt dump xmltree com.android.settings*.apk AndroidManifest.xml I would like to start ...


6

You should be able to call the messaging intent with am start -a android.intent.action.VIEW "sms:numberhere" -e "sms_body" "hello" Using the intent command as described here: http://learnandroid.blogspot.com/2008/01/run-android-application-from-command.html http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4967448/send-sms-in-android


6

You don't need root. You also don't need a terminal, for an app to use its own private utilities. But if you want vim, Terminal IDE provides that, a number of other utilities (git, ssh, tmux), the ability to use bash or Java as a 'scripting language' at the terminal, and the ability to create and install Android apps on-device. I use Terminal IDE and vim ...


6

Use this: am start -a android.intent.action.MAIN -n <package_name>/<full_class_name> To control an app, you'll have to put correct values of <package_name> and <full_class_name> in the command. For example, you can use com.google.gmail/com.google.gmail.check_mail (Hypothetical names) as last part of command. Obtaining package name ...


5

Settings -> About Phone should tell you most of what you want to know. Failing that, it will at least tell you a model name which you can then search google for more info. My 'About Phone' lists Model, CPU info (i.e. what CPU) and Memory info among other things. But I am running CM7 with Gingerbread.


5

The following terminal command should enable Bluetooth via adb shell or Terminal Emulator app: su am start -a android.bluetooth.adapter.action.REQUEST_ENABLE On most versions of Android, this command will present a pop-up window to the user asking to confirm request to enable BT. I believe this was done for security purposes whenever an app that is not ...


4

The su binary works just like it does on Linux; it runs all commands that follow as root until you type exit (or terminate the process, etc.). sudo <command> essentially does: su <command> exit Android doesn't normally include sudo, so If you wish to launch commands like you would with sudo, the syntax is as follows: su -c ...


4

Use one of those: cat /proc/mounts mount # free disk space of mounted fs' df # this shows you available devices cat /proc/partitions ps: Lines containing asec are moved-to-sdcard apps (it's each an encrypted volume per app for security reasons)


4

You don't need to root your phone to run adb logcat with the Android SDK, but I did just test it in my Terminal Emulator and I did have to be root (used the su command -- my phone is already rooted) to run logcat in the terminal on my phone. So yes: if you have root on your phone you can run logcat from a terminal on your phone.


4

There are native programs available on Android for creating file systems, and in most cases they reside in a directory below /system (my Motorola Droid 2 e.g. has them in /system/xbin. Depending on the file system you want to create, you can chose between: mkfs.ext2 mkfs.minix (unlikely you want that -- and it might even be not available with your ROM) ...


4

Native binaries (as the mkfs.* tools are) need to be compiled for the platform they should run on. So if you take the mkfs.ext3 from your Ubuntu workstation, which probably is either x86 or x86-64, it will not work on your Android device, which most likely uses ARM architecure.


4

Summing up from the comments: First you need to understand that updating apps works different on Android than it does on a "normal" Linux distro: There is no such thing as "apt". Though Android has its own package manager (listening to the pm command), installs/updates are usually dealt with by services/apps like google-play-store or other ...


3

As eldarerathis already mentioned: On many (if not most) devices supporting an SD card, this card is mounted with the noexec option -- which means as the name suggests: "no exec from here", i.e. you cannot execute anything from the sdcard. Again, one solution was already mentioned by eldarerathis: Try a different storage. You've got the power, your device ...


3

Most of the terminal commands in android are the limited version of standard Linux/Unix/POSIX terminal commands, provided by the toolbox program. Notably absent from toolbox is the cp (file copy) command, you must use cat file1 > file2 instead. If you spend a lot of time in the shell, you may want to install busybox, which provides a richer set of ...


3

BTEP has a "Using Better Terminal Emulator Pro" page on their wiki which explains most of the special shortcuts and keys. The basic breakdown of what you're looking for is: For directional input: Either use a keyboard that supports this or use BTEP's virtual direction pad feature. You can access it by tapping the screen when the keyboard is visible, ...


3

Escape the $ in the sub-class name and it should work: shell@android:/ # am start -S com.android.settings/.Settings\$PowerUsageSummaryActivity Starting: Intent { cmp=com.android.settings/.Settings$PowerUsageSummaryActivity } shell@android:/ # Another option is to instead send the intent that the Power Usage screen listens for: shell@android:/ # am start ...


3

The best Terminal Emulator out there currently is: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=jackpal.androidterm Here is it's wiki: http://github.com/jackpal/Android-Terminal-Emulator/wiki Regards,


3

Currently, there's no stable solution available, but you can try KeySwap to associate specific keyboard to an app. As Android doesn't allow an app to change Input Method programatically, your device needs to be rooted for this to work.


3

From the terminal, you can use svc to control several elements of your device. For mobile data, it would be: To disable: svc data disable To enable: svc data enable You can simply type svc help for a list of available commands, or svc help [command] for a list of subcommands. For example: To get the list of subcommands for controlling mobile data: svc ...


3

You can use Android Debug Bridge (ADB) shell to issue basic Linux commands on your phone, just like you would in a terminal emulator app. To install you'll need to do the following: On the phone go to Settings -> About phone, and tap on "Build number" seven times. This enabled Developer tools. Go back to the main Settings screen and you should now see ...


3

Quite easy: find / starts exploring at the file system root (i.e. the very top). So it comes to places you have no access to as normal user, and runs into permission issues. It sees a directory called /proc/19619 and, knowing this is a directory, wants to traverse into it. But it is not permitted to (most likely the permission of that directory is something ...


2

Hacker's Keyboard - use a full soft keyboard on Android You can use the free, open source, app call Hacker's Keyboard to gain access to the buttons of a full keyboard: “Are you missing the key layout you're used to from your computer? This keyboard has separate number keys, punctuation in the usual places, and arrow keys. It is based on the AOSP ...


2

This is a known design problem when using statically linked libresolv and glibc. You have 2 options: Use Google Android's native libc Bionic library instead of glibc. Build busybox to search libraries in /system/lib (or make the necessary links e.g. /usr/lib -> /system/lib ). Place ld-linux.so.3, libc.so.6, libresolv.so.2, libnss_dns.so.2 in your ...


2

Since I stumbled over the same problem as you did I started to compile a list of useful commands in the Android Shell including examples. A German version is on my blog.


2

I'd think a simple web search with the name of your device and "specs" should return all of the information you need. There are any number of sources of this information on the Web. Here's a link I found after a simple search: http://chinagadgetdeals.info/official-rockchip-based-apad-irobot-android-tablet/


2

Note sure if this question should really been have migrated here. But this is a typical case of a vacuum that we have here. It's not really an android end-user question and on the other hand not a android programming question. Anyway it looks like a typical codepage/localisation problem: "<" on an US layout is ";" on an German (and maybe others) ...



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