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17

Android phones have at least 2 fingers in the pot that iPhones do not: the hardware maker and the network carrier. The hardware makers often consider their drivers trade secrets, and therefore must learn the new versions code and then adapt their drivers. Manufacturers also often provide custom "skins" that must be updated for the new version, and sometimes ...


16

You are correct. The built-in browser is only updated when a full new ROM is installed. If there is an exploit, the only thing to do is wait for a new version of the OS to be released. Alternatively, you can use a third-party browser such as Opera or Google Chrome. Those are installed as apps and can receive updates independently. As far as I know, there ...


12

update.zip are never touched by Android. Inside that archive is a script that is parsed and interpreted by the Recovery runtime. The Recovery, at execution, opens the archive by unzipping into a temporary directory, reads the script, aptly named update-script, analyzes it, and based on the syntax, executes a function known to Recovery, that function may do ...


11

Beware: The instructions are for clean installing an OS. That means ALL YOUR DATA will be permanently LOST. If your phone was previously rooted it will be brought back to an unrooted state (whether you want it or not). Please, remember to make backups of any important data on your phone. It will be lost. 1. Turning on USB debuging Turn on USB debugging ...


11

According to the Google Play Business and Program Policies, you may re-install any app you have purchased, unlimited. (also if the app has been updated since you bought it). Based on my experience it works like that indeed: I have updated and re-installed paid apps without any issue. Please note that the re-install/update also works on any other android ...


10

Users can update several apps at once using Android version 2.2. An answer in the Android support forum says: They have added this already but this is probably limited to market client app on Android 2.2 aka FroYo and higher firmware. Also, I don't see anything in the market would bring this out for pre-2.2 phones, but it could be out there.


10

These are accessibility apps. One of Motorola's FAQ questions summarizes their purposes well: KickBack - Check to vibrate the phone briefly as feedback as you navigate the phone’s user interface, press buttons, and so on. TalkBack - Check to cause an installed speech synthesizer to speak the labels or names of items as you navigate the phone’s user ...


10

Once a manufacturer abandons supporting the device, your only choice is rooting it, unlocking its bootloader (if possible) and installing custom ROMs. Google only releases the Android source code into AOSP (Android Open Source Project,) and has no say whether or not the manufacturer or carrier will update a given device. The only exception is the Nexus ...


10

Phone updates are an odd thing. Manufacturers decide if the phone is capable of handling the update (based on the device's hardware) and carriers decide when to push the updates to the handsets. There are exceptions, such as Wifi only devices, where it is solely up to the manufacturer. However, system updates are generally a good thing. These updates bring ...


10

Android does not natively back up applications so you can't "undo" an app update. Best thing I'd say you can do is something like this howto. It backs up your apks and their settings. It uses Titanium Backup and requires root, but rooting is not your problem.


10

It appears to be random chance. In this reddit thread, Google Employee Dan Merrill says of OS update rollouts and "mashing" the "check for updates button": Rollouts are conducted in phases. Typically they start at 1% of devices for around 24 - 48 hours; we watch the return rates and resulting device checkins and error reports (if any), and make sure ...


10

This is a 2-part question. Part 1 asks why Android phones do not get the newest update right away, and has been answered adequately by the other answers. Part 2 asks why older phones often never get the newest update, and has not been answered yet. As LeBeau says, there are other corporate stakeholders besides Google. Google only creates the new versions, ...


9

Kickback / Soundback / talkback are Google's accessibility offerings. To turn them on, go to SETTINGS > ACCESSIBILITY. They allow users with low vision to navigate around Android by reading out and giving noises / vibrating feedback when buttons are pressed or new notifications are shown.


8

No, you can't work around it unless you make changes to the android sources and compile a custom ROM. The Installer Service is a core part of the system and cannot be replaced or overridden like other apps can. This is by design. It will only ask you again if one of the apps that was updated is one that has other apps that can perform the same task. The ...


8

To detect tampering, firmware updates are signed and (if you're using the recovery program that shipped with the phone) the signature is verified before install. After a mandatory confirmation from you that the installation should start, after a reboot, the recovery program will first verify this signature and only then install the new firmware. Note that ...


7

Going through the Galaxy S Flash/Root/ADB/ROM guide on XDA, I just spotted this: I'm running Linux/OSX. Can I still flash my firmware? Do I need to install windows? If you are running Linux you do not need to install Windows. You can either run Odin in a virtual machine or alternatively use Heimdall by Benjamin Dobell. Heimdall ...


7

Performance is generally a very subjective thing. There are apps that will measure specific aspects of performance, but that won't always correlate with what you feel from using the phone day to day. Generally, one of the reasons for upgrading to Froyo is that it should give you performance benefits, see this previous question on Froyo's performance. In ...


7

Somebody needs to write and test the drivers and core apps. That's all. Most applications that are written for Dalvik (i.e. most apk programs) are pretty portable across different Android versions, but not so much for core programs that were written in C, the Linux kernels and drivers, and the Dalvik VM itself. At the very least, these programs need to be ...


7

As Uri Herrera commented, you'll need to root your phone to be able to install custom firmware, and then install a community aftermarket firmware, like CyanogenMod. Most likely the open source community will keep updating the firmware (ROM) even after OEM has lost interest. How to root: You can refer to a nice guide by LifeHacker - most likely it can be ...


7

I did some searching due to the other answer and found someone on XDA claiming that this is a Market/Play bug, and you're seeing it because the Market thinks one of your apps is actually that OJSC Mobile app. Even better, I found this just-published story on The Verge: Samsung has several pieces of software that it installs on it devices but that aren't ...


7

Multiple approaches here. First, you can open the PlayStore App, hit the menu button, go to settings, and advise it to only work with WLAN, plus not install apps automatically. This would cover part of your problem. Second, you could also tell it to not check for updates at all. While on a first look this seems to contradict with your intention -- please ...


7

There an app developed to deal with that issue, Smart Timeout Keep Screen On by guidology available from Google Play Store: Smart Timeout allows you to specify apps that will keep the screen / display on. Once there are no specified apps visible on the screen the normal screen timeout is enabled. Works great while reading articles in web browsers, ...


7

The only devices that you can be confident about getting timely updates for are Nexus devices. These tend to get updates for at least 18 months and they receive them as soon as Google releases them (they're essentially Google devices made by other manufacturers). All other manufacturers take a while to release an update once it is released by Google, ...


6

Yes, assuming the device has been rooted and someone has engineered the update to work with your specific device. How fast that happens depends on how hard the devices manufacturer has made it, and how active the community is. Its not as simple as just loading windows on a computer. I asked a similar question a while ago. Check out the answers for more ...


6

I think it is the result of a new synchronization option in 2.1 or 2.2. On the first boot it asks whether you want to store some information about your apps online. I found it quite confusingly worded and was surprised by this effect. IIRC you can prevent this from happening by refusing all the synchronization on the first boot. And I learned to only update ...


6

After you posted this I got curious too but I couldn't find a change log. I emailed Amazon support and asked what changed and where I could find a release log and here's what they said: Unfortunately we do not have a change log detailing the changes made between versions of the Amazon Appstore app. I will forward your feedback on to the ...


6

Buy a Nexus S device directly from Google. They will be the fastest at updating to the latest firmware. And they will always ship with Stock Android. Everyone else is Way behind. most are behind because they add customizations to android and have to make their changes, then they have to go through the google approval process. Not to mention then having to go ...


6

I've had the same problem with the new Market app a couple times now, the only solution I've found is to clear the Market data in Settings -> Applications -> Manage applications -> Market -> Clear data (and Clear cache if it isn't already 0.00B). Now after you reopen Market, it should show the correct updates.


6

All OTA updates reset file permissions, so you'll lose root unless you take special precautions. Install OTA RootKeeper and make a backup of your su executable before applying this update. You'll be able to restore your root once update is finished. Obviously, since this is an incremental update, you need to have a stock Nexus ROM. If you deleted or altered ...


6

The same way as the phone would be: you have to wait for your manufacturer (in this case ASUS) releases an OTA update. Android JellyBean hasn't been released yet - source and updates for Google Nexus devices will be released on July 15th, so update for your tablet probably wont be available for at least a month. Of course the other option is rooting and ...



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