Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

This community wiki will list all of the known and rumored dates for devices. If you have an update make sure to follow the format that's been established, and the following guidelines: Keep phones in alphabetical order listing the manufacturer and model Specify if the date is confirmed or rumored and link to the source If there is an unofficial release, ...


17

Android phones have at least 2 fingers in the pot that iPhones do not: the hardware maker and the network carrier. The hardware makers often consider their drivers trade secrets, and therefore must learn the new versions code and then adapt their drivers. Manufacturers also often provide custom "skins" that must be updated for the new version, and sometimes ...


16

This community wiki will list all of the known and rumored dates for devices. If you have an update make sure to follow the format that's been established, and the following guidelines: Keep phones in alphabetical order listing the manufacturer and model Specify if the date is confirmed or rumored and link to the source If there is an unofficial release, ...


16

There isn't anything built in but you can use an app such as Changelog Droid. You would need to add the apps you wish to be notified for to the Observed list within the app.


15

See this image released by HTC. It describes the update process in a very detailed form: Edit: fixed link


12

update.zip are never touched by Android. Inside that archive is a script that is parsed and interpreted by the Recovery runtime. The Recovery, at execution, opens the archive by unzipping into a temporary directory, reads the script, aptly named update-script, analyzes it, and based on the syntax, executes a function known to Recovery, that function may do ...


10

It appears to be random chance. In this reddit thread, Google Employee Dan Merrill says of OS update rollouts and "mashing" the "check for updates button": Rollouts are conducted in phases. Typically they start at 1% of devices for around 24 - 48 hours; we watch the return rates and resulting device checkins and error reports (if any), and make sure ...


10

This is a 2-part question. Part 1 asks why Android phones do not get the newest update right away, and has been answered adequately by the other answers. Part 2 asks why older phones often never get the newest update, and has not been answered yet. As LeBeau says, there are other corporate stakeholders besides Google. Google only creates the new versions, ...


9

This community wiki will list all of the known and rumored dates for devices. If you have an update make sure to follow the format that's been established, and the following guidelines: Keep devices in alphabetical order listing the manufacturer and model Specify if the date is confirmed or rumored and link to the source If there is an unofficial ...


7

The only devices that you can be confident about getting timely updates for are Nexus devices. These tend to get updates for at least 18 months and they receive them as soon as Google releases them (they're essentially Google devices made by other manufacturers). All other manufacturers take a while to release an update once it is released by Google, ...


6

No manufacturer makes any promises about future system updates for a device. They would shoot themselves in the foot if they would, because if the device fails to get a good market share the resources needed to keep an device up to date would be lost. I order to ensure that you get updates for your Android devices you have basically two options: Go with ...


6

As far as I know it does download just the updates (referred to as the "delta") on Jellybean 4.1 and above. Obviously the initial install is the full app but updates only download the data that has changed from the current installed version (i.e. the "delta" of it). You won't see anything different when updating most app, it will still look like it's ...


5

You retain your groups if you have the same number. Off-topic, you may also want to check the official documentation on how to back-up and restore your chat history to the new phone.


4

Nope, there will be no official support for Android 4.4 on the Galaxy Nexus. However, you will almost certainly be able to flash custom ROMs that are based on it. There's some supposition and explanation going on on Android Police. They make a few good points: The Galaxy Nexus is old and well outside normal support windows. The CPU Manufacturer doesn't ...


4

Did you try clearing the app-data of play store? If not, try clearing the app-data, and/or any updates installed by play store, and allow it to install a Play Store update again (it will do this automatically), and then try using Google Play Store.


4

You have to wait until Samsung lets out their update with their added components, or flash a custom ROM onto it. I don't know how to do that, so I won't provide a recommendation. Depending on what network you're on, it may be a little while yet. An article about that.


4

I think there are a number of reasons why updates are so slow for android devices: The time it takes a manufacturer to apply their customisations to the new version and ensure everything works OK can be quite long. This has improved over the last year or so as Google give them an Android PDK, or the Platform Development Kit which should allow them to work ...


3

As geff described, you cannot avoid a wipe/factory-reset. But you can do a proper backup beforehand, so you can restore most of your data afterwards. This should work without any trouble for the apps you've installed yourself ("user apps"), while special care must be taken for pre-installed apps ("system apps"): As data structures (inside their databases) ...


3

If all else fails, you can flash those images in Fastboot. Remember to make a Nandroid and back it up somewhere safe - this will wipe your device. If you're on Windows or OSX, you'll need to install Fastboot through the Android SDK. It's part of the "Platform Tools" package. If you're on Linux, you can usually install fastboot through your package manager. ...


3

Since you bought your phone from Kuwait, the phone has the Kuwait Galaxy Note 2 Rom, and still now the 4.3 update has not been pushed out in Kuwait or the middle east region for both the note 2 and s3. But for the Indian Rom 4.3 has already been pushed out for both the phones. My brother had the same problem with his s3 and since I have some knowledge in ...


3

IN App updates (Host files etc): Basically because you are in an arms race agains the advertising / app developers. The developers want you to see the advertising, as this is one of their sources of income. They are also aware of Ad-Block, AdAway, AdFree etc etc and are constantly trying new advertisers, new proxies and new methods of embedding the ...


3

While that RAM restriction applies to several low-end devices (which came with less than 512 MB RAM), it is not really the main reason for missing updates. And looking into the custom-rom scene proves that many devices abandoned by their manufacturers (not too seldom for this reason) are in fact supporting newer versions. So when talking about "official ...


3

Short answer: no. Long answer: Nexus factory images, as so kindly implied by their name, are complete snapshots of the software installed on a Nexus device prior to leaving the factory. Due to the device-specific nature of Android, e.g. it needs specific drivers for it to run on any one given device, it is generally impossible (or illogical, as it seems) ...


2

I think the easiest way is to use GNex Toolkit: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1392310


2

Go to this XDA-Developers thread and follow the instructions. You have to download an APK from there and install it as a system app. [How-to] Disable OTA updates on Stock + Rooted ROMs - xda-developers


2

If you don't use them, there is no point in updating them. The only benefit of updating would be that they will stop giving annoying reminders to update - at least until their next update. Many of these bloatware/crapware additions can't be removed without rooting the phone. However, many of them will respond to a Force Stop after which they won't prompt ...


2

Did you tried Google Android rooting? Is there something in the articles that your don't understand? Rooting means allowing an application to gain root privilege. This is usually done by hacking the existing kernel or flashing a new kernel. Some devices locked the bootloader, you have to "unlock the bootloader" first in order to flash a new kernel. As ...


2

You might provide them a link! A link on your website, that would provide them with the .apk file. After downloading, the user would install that file in his android phone. After installing, the previous version is auto-deleted and the new version is installed! User data is saved. But I have never used the developer tools from Google Play. So I am not ...


2

There's no guarantee that any device will ever see an Android OS update. A Nexus device will probably see two, maybe three, updates (if the past is any guide). Devices from big-name manufacturers will probably, eventually, see one Android upgrade. However, considering the resources needed to modify the Android source to fit with their customizations as ...


2

Google maps new version is all rounder application for your navigation and maps, You can find that feature inside your new google map application itself, That's the reason why your applications has been some applications are replaced with brand new application which offer all features of replaced applications.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible