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19

Android 4.0 introduces WiFi Direct in to the core of android. it basically creates an adhoc connection between one device and another using WiFi by creating what I guess could be considered an Access Point. You do not need a wifi access point to use WiFi Direct, and actually, if you are connected to wifi when turning on WiFi direct, it will disconnect you. ...


19

A stock ROM is the ROM that comes with a device; the device is "stocked" with that ROM by the manufacturer. Android is generally customized by the manufacturer to some degree; at minimum there needs to be device-specific drivers and so on for Android to work on a particular device. As Flow notes, customizations may include a custom theme, launcher, and ...


17

You don't need to compile the source code to get an idea of what AOSP looks like; if you download the Android emulator, it includes a default device image that is just AOSP plus a few developer tools, without any of the Google services. This sums up to: The linux kernel, dalvik VM, Java libraries, and Android framework Stock Launcher (including the various ...


13

In short, you can't just install a stock image from the Google source on any phone because to produce an image, you need all the drivers for the individual phone's hardware. If you can get hold of these, then it is possible to build a stock image but a lot of manufacturers don't release them. For simpler solution (if you don't want a Nexus S or Nexus One) ...


13

Home Screen Up to 7 Home screens, with the ability to add and remove screens at will, and drag them around to change the order (pinch zoom the home screen) Customizable dock area at the bottom of the home screen, allowing you to add/remove up to 4 apps. Apps List 'Screen at a time' sideways scrolling apps list Rounded square backgrounds added to all ...


11

OTA updates don't wipe the device: all apps and data are preserved across the update. Even so, it's always a good idea to back up your data frequently. As you point out, not all apps support the in-built Google backup mechanism, so it's wise to have a full backup just in case. See our backup tag wiki and top questions to learn about what options are ...


9

Technically, yes, you can build the "plain version" of Android: http://source.android.com/source/initializing.html However, it is difficult to do this for all but a handful of devices (official "Google" developer devices, such as the Nexus line of phones) because every Android phone requires its own drivers and these are not freely available. This is where ...


9

AOSP (Android Open-Source Project) is the project with the open-source parts of Android. It's used as a base by anyone who wants to build or customize an Android ROM. Although new Android features are developed in secret inside Google, when a new Android version is released, all the code changes to the open-source parts get merged into AOSP soon afterwards. ...


7

The most stable option at this point is to use CyanogenMod. You can get it onto your Fire by doing the following: Root and Custom Recovery On Windows, you can use the Kindle Fire Utility to root the Kindle Fire and install Team Win's recovery (TWRP). It's extremely straightforward, and should even set up the Google drivers for you. The whole process is ...


7

Yes, you should buy a Nexus One or a Nexus S. If you buy another phone like e.g. HTC Wildfire, you can't easily get the "vanilla" Android.


7

They are both Linux, but the AOSP kernel is a very standardized, general Linux kernel provided by Google that requires minimal modification to work across different devices, to make it easier for manufacturers to get Android working. The various modifications made by manufacturers to their own kernels relate to the different hardware found in these devices. ...


7

A ROM for the HTC One won't work on the HTC One X+. Despite the name similarity, they're completely different phones, with different hardware inside. (The HTC One X+ has a Tegra 3 SoC, while the HTC One has a Snapdragon.) If you want to install a "stock Android" ROM on this phone, you'll have to find one first, and as there isn't a Google Play Edition for ...


6

It is very unlikely that Samsung will ever release an unmodified Android firmware for the Galaxy S II. They've never released one for their Galaxy S family of phones without their TouchWiz "enhancements". Historically the only Android devices that have run the stock OS have been the very early phones released by each manufacturer (before they'd written ...


6

This is pretty much just a matter of preference, to be honest. I don't think you'll really "lose" any functionality on a Desire by going to an AOSP based ROM, either 2.3 or otherwise. You should gain built-in USB and wifi tethering, though, since those are a standard part of Android 2.2+. The real deciding factor will just be if you prefer the Sense UI or ...


5

Assuming just vanilla ICS, with no custom UI from a manufacturer/carrier or anything: A phone has a status bar at the top and soft buttons (or hardware buttons) at the bottom. A tablet will only have the bottom bar, with soft buttons on the left and clock/notifications on the right. The notification pane pulls down from the top status bar like in previous ...


5

AOSP software is released by the Android Open Source Project (i.e., by Google), while stock software may include modifications by manufacturers.


5

When referring to AOSP - you are referring to the original source - Android Open Source Project direct from Google, that is the base stock ROM that manufacturers and ROM modders use as a base. Many ROM makers fork the AOSP source for their version, to name but a few: Cyanogenmod Cafogen Replicant Codeaurora AOKP Touchwiz Having an AOSP stock ROM is not ...


4

I wouldn't want to call MotoBlur or HTC Sense just "skins" -- they aren't a suite of visual enhancements, but an entire app suite that sits on top of the OS. They're full-fledged graphical user interfaces with additional custom apps, virtual keyboards, widgets, etc. So, as to the benefits? I like Sense - its my major UI on the Incredible, but I've also used ...


4

I have to disagree with eldarerathis. I've never used Sense, but the number of problems people have with it indicate to me that it is inferior on a reliability level. While vanilla Android is not perfect either, I would certainly trust it more.


4

integration with social networks (Facebook, Flickr, Twitter), including down to the contacts application, with contact pictures and everything free "lost phone" functionality, without the need for a third-party application (eg. Lookout), including remote lock and wipe an (arguably) easier to use keyboard, with quick access to numbers and common symbols ...


3

There's a new app on the Android market called FileBeam that lets you Beam DropBox files from Android to Android. Maybe that can help you too ;) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.filebeamapp.android


3

Motoblur has a bunch of widget-based applications which bring your social networks and/or emails together for ease of viewing, as well as weather, rss feeds and other simple UI elements/widgets that can come in handy. However, Motoblur keeps a process running in the background for each service (type of widget) and thus many people (myself included) forego it ...


3

You can get whatever phone you want, but since you're a developer you might not have any problems with flashing custom ROMs, and there are awesome custom ROMs for all the devices out there that will not come with any customization, just pure Vanilla. If you want a good place to publish/promote your development work and also find the custom ROMs for the ...


3

My answer focuses a bit more on the Sense vs No-Sense (see the bottom part for links about 2.3 vs 2.2). I currently have a Sense based ROM on my EVO and CyanogenMod on my old Hero. Now there are differences in the devices so that must be taken into account but here is what I have found. On my Hero, I had a Sense based ROM for a long time and liked it (I ...


3

You have two options I know of to 'de-Orange' the San Francisco. You can use something like Titanium Backup (requires root) to remove the Orange apps, or install a custom ROM. On my San Francisco I rooted the phone (see first part of this video, full details and file downloads here, or alternatively you could use Super One Click) and then used Titanium ...


3

"Vanilla" Android devices (like the N1) usually mean that you wait less time to get updates for the phone (as it'll come straight from Google). This is because it takes additional time for manufacturers to add in their tweaks and UIs on top of the newer version of Android. The second fastest to Vanilla stock would be a custom rom like CyanogenMod which ...


3

What you are describing is what's known as a "dirty flash" which is a no-no! Especially from AOSP to CM and vice-versa, could lead all sorts of force closes etc. Likewise, [a particular custom ROM (insert of your choice)] to another but different [custom ROM (insert of your choice)] and vice-versa. The only time a dirty flash can be performed if going from ...


3

YES, you can delete the stock Email (Email.apk) and stock Calendar (Calendar.apk, CalendarProvider.apk) app. For a list of other apps you can delete on CyanogenMod, see the expandable list at the bottom of the CM wiki. I'm not so sure for AOSP though.


2

There's a full on guide to installing android 2.2 here orangesanfrancisco.co.uk


2

Here's a full stock ROM for the Nexus S (via XDA): http://android.clients.google.com/packages/ota/google_crespo/f182cf141e6a.signed-soju-ota-102588.f182cf14.zip (MD5: 3e8908941043951da5a34bb2043dd1a0) You should be able to name that update.zip and put it in the root of your SD card; upon reboot it will be installed.



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