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20

It is not detectable, but using tethering on Android with an second device leaves a lot of traces: User-Agent Headers within HTTP that come from non-mobile browser Increased Traffic consumption Connection to services that are not available on Android/Smartphone devices (e.g. World of Warcraft) and many more I can't think of atm. But I have never heard ...


16

I decided to look up some data, and my guess seems to be correct: http://nesl.ee.ucla.edu/fw/documents/reports/2007/PowerAnalysis.pdf According to the report, Bluetooth takes the least amount of energy. However your 3G radio will probably take the most energy; maintaining a 3G connection without transferring any data is cheap, but once you start ...


9

The Galaxy Tab comes with Android version 2.2 (Froyo), this version of the Android OS comes with the ability to work as a WiFi hotspot for up to 5 devices built in. This lets you share your Tab's 3G connection out to other devices over Wifi. I've tethered wifi only devices like my Kindle 3, and a wifi Skype phone to my Galaxy S's wireless hotspot in this ...


7

There are apps on the market that can do this on most rooted phone. Barnacle is pretty popular for this and people seem to like it. Actually the first review for the app is someone doing exactly what you want to do just with an Ipad. Just search for "barnacle wifi hotspot" on the Market, good luck.


6

Unfortunately, there is no way to change the IP address range for the builtin tethering support, even in CyanogenMod. The Wi-Fi hotspot IP is hardcoded in android.net.wifi.WifiStateMachine.startTethering(); the USB tethering IP is hardcoded in com.android.server.connectivity.Tethering. However, if your phone is rooted, you can try using third-party apps for ...


5

For completeness, now I got the tablet to connect to adhoc: wpa_supplicant.conf edit ctrl_interface=/data/misc/wifi/wpa_supplicant ctrl_interface_group=1010 update_config=1 ap_scan=2 #added ap_scan=2 so it scans all networks including ad-hoc #this causes priorities to be ignored below. #it just goes through the networks one by one. # this can really ...


5

Here's a version I developed that does it exactly like this - be aware there could be bugs in this, it may not work for CDMA/EVO as am in the EU using GSM! It is a client/server based architecture. Install To install the application, do the following: Plug in cable into device adb install WifiTether3G-release.apk The gist of the app is this: ...


5

If you have no reason to why the wifi drops, you might try changing the wifi sleep policy. The wifi sleep policy handles when or if the wifi connection shall switch to mobile data. If this option is set to the default value, When screen turns off, wifi connection automatically switches off when the phone has been idle for a while. You can try setting this to ...


4

Here is the ultimate answer: First, on your phone, install a terminal-emulator from Android market, then run cat /proc/cpuinfo which will show you the detailed processor information of your phone (ARM5 in my case). Afterwards, you need to install an ARM5 cross-compiler environment on your Linux box (download Ubuntu and VirtualBox if you are a ...


4

The ADB over Wifi Widget works over mobile AP connections, though it does require root. You'd need to install it, place the widget on one of your home screens, and then tap it to turn on wireless ADB connections. The widget should then show the IP you need to connect to (ex: in my case it was 192.168.43.1) and the port to use (mine was 8000, but this is ...


4

The Android builtin wifi tethering is designed to use 192.168.43.1/24 as the server, with netd handling the tethering, using dnsmasq. First DNS range is 192.168.42.1-254 and and 2nd DNS range is 192.168.43.1-254. Netd is not easy to change. It requires a socket to communicate with it, and that socket is taken when android starts tethering. But going through ...


3

I had the same problem and solved it on a Samsung Captivate (Galaxy S - SGH-I896) with Rogers in Canada. The problem was an annoyance at first (disconnecting every 10-20min) but got worse one day when it stopped allowing tethering altogether with a message "This Account is not configured for Tethering. Please Contact Rogers Customer Care." Calling Rogers ...


3

IIRC you can't put an wireless interface in promiscuous mode when it's used. But this may not be true for all interfaces/chipsets/drivers. You can install Shark for Root, which is a cut-down wireshark for Android. It does sniff on Layer 2 and above without promiscuous mode, so the results are not the same as sniffing with e.g. kismet. On the other hand you ...


3

I ran into the same problem with my archos tab not being able to see an adhoc wireless connection. I was able to effectively connect my unrooted archos (running 2.2) and my rooted droid (also on 2.2) via the bluetooth tether option of the "wireless tether for root" app. To be clear this allowed me to access the web on my tab through my phones 3g connection. ...


3

Depending on what device you're using, Android Wifi Tether might work for you. It's also in the Market, but the Google code page has the most recent versions . It supports WEP, WPA, and MAC address filtering (they refer to this as "access control"). You may need a custom kernel for it to work - this again depends on your device/ROM. You could also try one ...


3

Most likely, your X8 is broadcasting the wireless network in ad-hoc mode rather than infrastructure (AP) mode. Android does not natively support ad-hoc wireless connections, which is why your tablet cannot see or connect to the hotspot. Your options depend largely on the state of your devices. If your phone is rooted then you can try a custom ROM or kernel ...


3

Android, starting from 4.0, does officially support a form of p2p wifi networking called Wifi Direct. A Wifi Direct-capable device can create an access point which any other Wifi-capable device can access. I don't know about Nexus 7 specifically, but Galaxy Nexus does support Wifi Direct so I'd presume that so is Nexus 7.


3

In Android 4.2 and later, you can tell Android which Wi-Fi networks are mobile hotspots. In the device Settings, go to the Data usage page, then open the overflow menu (the three dots in the top-right) and click Mobile hotspots. It shows a list of Wi-Fi networks known to the device: tick any that are mobile hotspots. Then, when you're on a network that's ...


2

When I first rooted my Droid (with EasyRoot), I remained on the stock ROM until I got annoyed by the OTA update message (and ended up switching to CM6). However, I was able to use Wireless Tether without doing anything else. No new kernel, no mods, nada. Just root on vanilla Android. If you've already updated to the latest version of Android via OTA, ...


2

It's all possible, but it's is going to depend a lot on the particular tablet you buy. I can tell you right now that PDANet is not going to work Android to Android. I emailed them about this and that was their answer. Bluetooth tether is possible and again is going to depend on the device. All the Archos Gen 8 tablets have BT Tethering capability (to ...


2

The only tethering methods currently supported on Blackberry services are via USB and bluetooth, and even then the only supported method relies on the Blackberry Desktop software. They don't currently support any wifi tethering or wifi hotspot functionality. I'm not aware of any third party software for wifi tethering either, unfortunately. Now if you had ...


2

Did you download Wireless Tether from the Market or from http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/ ? If you are running Android 2.1 you need to take the extra steps listed here: http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/wiki/Setup_HTC_Desire_Incredible If you are running 2.2 then in theory it should just work. I would first try the latest release ...


2

You can't monitor your Wi-Fi network using tethering even if Android supports promiscuous mode for the Wi-Fi chipset. Reason: Tethering does NAT internally and assigns you an IP in a 192.168.* private range via a DHCP daemon running on your phone. There's no way you can see pure Wi-Fi traffic this way. What you can do: Have a custom firmware installed ...


2

I was able to solve this, but it's not pretty. Following the advice in this thread, I applied a hack to the radio that gets Wireless Tether working. Edit: I can confirm this exact procedure will also work on a Droid X. Download and install RadioComm. It worked fine on Windows 7 x64. Open Radiocom. This was the first time I opened the app, and a ...


2

No, you don't need to have your phone rooted to enable a portable hotspot. Not quite sure why it isn't working for you, but here are the reasons it hasn't worked for me at various times. No cell data connection. I've tried using the hotspot as a relay to another wi-fi network without any success. The original wi-fi connection is shut down. Misconfigured ...


2

Your Android phone (if that is what you mean by having two Android), should have a setting for Wireless Tethering. Open the Settings -> Wireless option in your Android phone and there you will get the option. You will need to provide a name to the network and then try to search for that name in the other phone, as a New Wireless Network. Also, your Data ...


2

ClockworkMod Tether does USB tethering without root and Bluetooth tethering is planned (it's still in alpha). Unfortunately, from what I understand only Windows, Linux & Mac OS will be supported, but who knows what will happen in the future (maybe Wi-Fi support). Koush's apps are great.


2

There are many 3rd-party apps available on the Market that allow you to set up actions (toggle cell data on/off, for example) at specified triggers (e.g. on a timer.) Tasker and AutomateIt are great examples. If you have a specific data limit on your plan (e.g. 3GB per billing cycle), a more advanced app like 3G Watchdog would be a better choice. It ...


2

This is probably largely a preference thing, but a couple of things I can think of off the top of my head: The built-in tethering may only be usable with an extra fee on top of a normal data plan, whereas third-party apps with work regardless. I'm not really privvy to AT&T's plans these days, so I can't say for sure in your specific situation. This ...


2

It is normal to disable Droidwall, for the reason that it blocks any incoming packets for port 67, to allow Wifi Tethering to work. Or quite simply, allow a custom script that matches the port number 67 which is dhcp to pass through. FYI about Droidwall - the functionality and development efforts have been discontinued and the author sold it off to Avast. ...



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