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7

Yes and yes. http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=8035 I haven't seen any resolution to this except changing the router's SSID if you have access to it.


4

I've just checked on my Galaxy Nexus, and yes there's an option for WPA Enterpise (802.1x EAP) with EAP methods: PEAP TLS TTLS and Phase-2 authentication types: None PAP MSCHAP MSCHAPv2 GTC You can use an identity with a passphrase, or certificates While I am running a custom ROM, I'm almost 100% positive this is in stock, as I could do the same on ...


3

I had neither Android 4.0 nor uses WPA2 Enterprise, but according to this tutorial, it is possible to connect to WPA2 Enterprise, even though there is no indication about the support in the UI. The underlying wifi stack have always supported WPA2 Enterprise, as it uses the wpa supplicant, only that there is not yet any support in the configuration GUI. I ...


3

My solution was to change the front room wifi to WPA2 to match the backroom's wifi (WPA2) which I never had a problem with. Don't know why this works I cannot believe the SGS2 has less than optimum support for WPA. Maybe it was buggy software ... although I am fully updated and have been since I got the phone. (September 11) I should mention this was not a ...


3

The original SGS supports WPA2 with AES, so I would bet that the SGS2 does. There seems to be a glut of routers that don't play nicely with non-PC devices when using WPA, for whatever reason, so I would suspect that's your issue.


3

In supporting the answer, I shall refer to the checking on the Wi-Fi Alliance site. Look in: Filter by Company, select (Show All) from drop-down box. Filter Products by Primary Category, select Smartphone, multi-mode (Wi-Fi and other) from drop-down box. Filter Products by Secondary Category, select (Show All) from drop-down box. Put into the box, CID#, ...


3

I have a Galaxy Nexus with Android 4 (ICS) and my company uses WPA2 Enterprise. Use Phase 2 authentication "MSCHAPv2" plus your user name and password. That worked perfectly for me.


2

It's a problem with your router. After Android successfully connects to a Wi-Fi network, it tests to see if it can use this network to access the Internet. This is because it's commonplace for Wi-Fi networks to redirect all requests to some kind of login page, until you've logged in. The "Sign-in to Wi-Fi network" notification is nothing to do with ...


1

The MDM solution can require that you set a PIN. The Google Apps Device Policy app, for example, can require you to set a PIN. This is described in the Google Device Policy for Android if you want more details.


1

This is an official solution I found after weeks of testing and research. In the end, the driver is not loaded properly or by default, custom ROM created the havoc. I noticed that when running ADB GUI, there is this file missing from /system/data/misc/wifi called WCNSS_qcom_cfg.ini . I'm using ADB Helper Version 4.2.0.0, under build.prop Viewer tab, choose ...


1

ad-hoc mode used to be supported in the Cyanogen ROMS, it is not in the stock images AFAIK. Depending on your application, you might use Wifi Direct but I think it's a different API (rather than just behaving like an ethernet segment) and it does not cover all the uses cases that ad-hoc does.


1

Ad-hoc is not natively supported by Android. But starting with Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich), a new feature called WiFi Direct was introduced: Wi-Fi Direct, previously known as Wi-Fi P2P, is a standard that allows Wi-Fi devices to connect to each other without the need for a wireless access point. This allows Wi-Fi Direct devices to directly transfer ...


1

The problem, in my experience, is that the vanilla Android UI doesn't give enough access to all the WiFi capabilities that the device possesses. What I've done on my devices in the past, in situations where I needed to connect to an enterprise wifi is to remote into the device and change the wpa_supplicant.conf file manually. To do this though you'll need ...


1

I've read about that phenomenon of some Androids having trouble in mixed WPA/WPA2 mode a couple of times now. As you described, people solved it by using either WPA or WPA2 (or even WEP). So WPA2 only you tried (but got trouble with your Mac). Any chances to pin it to only WPA? WEP would be a last-ressort, as it offers only marginal protection. Remark: Not ...


1

EDIT: There's now a project that got monitor mode working on the Galaxy S2 and the Google Nexus One. See http://bcmon.blogspot.de/ As far as I know there's currently no WEP/WPA cracking app. The fact Android is open and Linux based would allow this basically, however most (all?) wifi chipset drivers don't allow the necessary monitor mode and solutions ...


1

Free app called "WiFi Connection" allowed connection to my corp's hidden network, 802.1x, PEAP, MSCHAPV2, no CA Cert. "LEAP WiFi Free" did not. Running Galaxy S3 (VZW), stock ICS. 4.04


1

Try this, for it happened to me and a Nexus 7. My wireless router had the option of having the network run in WPA/WPA2 Personal or just WPA2. In WPA/WPA2 the Nexus 7 was stuck in a loop connecting and disconnecting from the network. Switching this to WPA2 only solved the problem for my Nexus 7. It may help in your case too.


1

There are some incompatibilities between Android devices and wireless routers. I've seen the same behavior on a couple of WLANs and some even go to "Acquiring IP Address..." and then disconnect. I suspect that your phone works well in other WPA2 secured WLANs? I haven't so far seen a comprehensive list of non-functioning routers, but at least one Netgear ...



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