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What can go wrong when flashing an unstable Android OS onto a phone? Is there an easy way to reset the phone if something goes wrong? Has anyone out there had experience flashing Android OS?

Why would I want to flash Gingerbread 2.3.3 aka Leaky onto my Samsung Epic 4G?

One benefit that I can see is that users of the Epic will be able to test their applications on > Froyo 2.2.1, which is currently the stable release for the phone.

EDIT: Also, what happens when the device wants to update again, say 2.3.4 is flashed onto the phone, and then Sprint finally releases a stable 2.3.4 in 2013. Assuming I still have this phone then, will it upgrade gracefully from the flashed ROM?

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    Questions that ask "in your opinion" are generally not the kind of questions we're looking for here. The kind of questions we like have (the potential for) a single, concrete answer.
    – ale
    Aug 4 '11 at 20:07
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    "Is it a good idea" is still asking for opinion.
    – ale
    Aug 4 '11 at 20:22
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Anything can go wrong, including issues that permanently brick the device.

That said, Galaxy S devices are compatible with a tool called Odin that can fix all but the worst problems. Example process.

I personally flash pretty much anything I feel like onto my Vibrant, and Odin has saved me many times. I wouldn't hesitate to flash something I wanted to try out, but you may wish to be more cautious.

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    Can't emphasize enough that for the phone the question is about (Epic) bricking is significantly low-risk. See instructions forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1052813 on XDA for details.
    – TREE
    Aug 5 '11 at 12:10
  • Also, 2.3.3 might not add much, but the more recent 2.3.4 leaks are supposed to allow for google video chat with the front camera. That's huge.
    – TREE
    Aug 5 '11 at 12:11

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