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I have failed to install CyanogenMod a few times in my Samsung Galaxy 4 (GT-I9605, Android 5.0.1 lollipop) in unrooted device. I still want to get CyanogenMod in my device so I am thinking to root my device and start the installation process 3rd time.

Is CyanogenMod easier to install in rooted device than unrooted?

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    You have failed to install CM maybe because you're trying to flash it using stock recovery. You can install ROMs using custom recovery only. (Like TWRP or CWM) – Gokul NC Jan 5 '16 at 8:58
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    @GokulNC I mentioned that in my answer. Also, the OP might be using download mode instead of recovery, which would be unreliable, and you would have to flash the images one-by-one – TheBro21 Jan 5 '16 at 20:42
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Both yes and no. You need custom recovery to flash CyanogenMod. If you have root with the non-recovery method, you can install the ROM manager from the Play Store, which makes the installation of a custom recovery rather simple.

From there, you just download the CM zip and flash it. Note that the ROM manager does have install ROM as a feature, so you can install from zip and it should automatically reboot to recovery and flash (but I think it works with CWM only, as I have TWRP and it just reboot).

  • Thank you for your answer! My mistake was wrong recovery system. I installed TWRP and everything went fine with CyanogenMod installation. – Léo Léopold Hertz 준영 Jan 5 '16 at 12:48
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    Despite download mode saying stuff about Custom OS, it is harder because you can only flash 1 image. That is why the harder method uses it to install recovery as it is 1 image. You would have to extract CM zip, and flash images on respective partitions, but it is quite tedious and perhaps dangerous – TheBro21 Jan 5 '16 at 12:52
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Well, AFAIK you need a custom recovery, so that you can flash the ROM from the .zip file. You can maybe flash a custom recovery using PC software, but there are tools that rely on root access to do such things on-the-fly without requiring a PC.

I usually install CM using .zip files through recovery, and I need root to be able to flash custom recovery on my phone.

  • You can flash a ROM from a .zip file in a stock recovery too. What matters here is what ROM is it that you're trying to flash in stock recovery. Consider clearly explaining your point. – Firelord Jan 5 '16 at 13:37
  • I don't think so, the stock recovery has signature checks which prevent any unsigned zips to install, while custom recoveries install any valid zip installation package. At least all my tries installing custom ROMs using stock recoveries failed with that error. And since we are talking here about CyanogenMod, I presumed there is no need to mention stock recoveries. – Chapz Jan 6 '16 at 8:51
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You usually cannot install a new or custom ROM without a rooted device that I am aware of. The nature of the process to install a new ROM pretty much means you have to have root for the installation to perform the required actions involved.

This is especially true for mainstream commercial devices such as the Samsungs, LGs, HTCs etc as they root protect their devices for security and to prevent people messing with their own customisations to the Android OS.

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    Well, actually you just need custom recovery. The app allowing root is optional, and makes it only slightly easier. By installing custom recovery, you already have root access from the recovery console, not from system (until supersu is installed), however rooting is the full process: Bootloader, Recovery, Supersu – TheBro21 Jan 5 '16 at 8:14
  • @TheBro21 - good point! I guess as I have always done the whole process that didn't occur to me :) – Matt_Roberts Jan 5 '16 at 10:15
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    I actually prefer the first root, then recovery as I kind of noticed the computer flashing being problematic sometimes. You can just install recovery with the click of a button with root first – TheBro21 Jan 5 '16 at 11:17

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