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So im trying to flash my phone to Android N.

Im going to be manually flashing each img file, however when I use the fastboot flash bootloader (location).img. It gives me this error:

target reported max download size of 134217728 bytes sending 'bootloader' (1434 KB)... OKAY [ 0.047s] writing 'bootloader'... FAILED (remote: size too large) finished. total time: 0.062s

I can clearly understand that the pre-allocated space for that partition on my phone is less than the one it requires.

So how do I re-partition them, so that I can go ahead and install Android N. I have no problem if this reduces my usable memory, but I can't figure out how to re-partition.

  • What phone is this for? Are your Android SDK Platform-Tools updated? – DukeSilversJazz Jul 15 '16 at 13:04
  • Which device you're using ? and post the full log and the order in which you're flashing the images. Make sure you have adb and fastboot drivers set up correctly. – rajatpunkstaa Jul 15 '16 at 13:54
  • @rajatpunkstaa Im using Micromax canvas A1 with android one. Yes SDK tools are up to date. Will post full logs in 24hours – user3621843 Jul 15 '16 at 16:34
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The Android N Developer Preview images are designed specifically for devices listed on the download page. Currently Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, Nexus 6, Nexus 9/9G, Nexus Player, Pixel C, General Mobile 4G, and Sony Xperia Z3 are the only devices that have official N Preview builds. You cannot flash these images onto other phones. At best your phone simply won't boot, and you'll have to reflash it to stock firmware. At worst - you can render your device completely inoperable by flashing an incompatible bootloader, and you won't be able to revert it to factory defaults.

If you want to try Android N on a different phone, your options are:

  • Wait for the manufacturer of your device to release an official version for your specific device
  • Wait until 3rd-party ROMs such as CyanogenMod can be built either from the source code (provided by Google in AOSP Project after the final version is released,) or cobbled together from compiled binaries retrieved from supported devices.

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