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For each version of iOS Apple publishes a list of the embedded root certificates:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205205

I am unable to find something similar for Android, I am wondering if these could differ by device vendor or if they all share a common set as part of Android proper?

My goal is to have a list of public CAs which are common in both Android and iOS (some minimum version of each)

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    this talks of Google’s list of root certificates, search leads to this - This site contains information on the Google Internet Authority G2, Google’s intermediate CA which issues digital certificates for Google web sites and properties. You can download the Certificate Practices Statement (CPS) which details Google’s practices on issuing digital certificates, as well as the intermediate certificates and the Certificate Revocation List (CRL) – beeshyams Sep 6 '16 at 15:03
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For anyone who is curious, I believe I found the answer:

Linux: There is no central root certificate program as part of Linux. When running on Linux, Google Chrome uses the Mozilla Network Security Services (NSS) library to perform certificate verification. When packaged or built from source, NSS includes certificates vetted according to the Mozilla Root Certificate Program. For most Linux users, it is sufficient that once included in the Mozilla Root Program, users of Google Chrome should see your root CA as trusted. However, please be aware that Linux distributions which package NSS may further alter this list with additions or removals based on local, distribution-specific root certificate programs, if any.

Android: Please file a bug at http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/entry .

Note that, similar to Linux, the certificates included within the Android sources may be further altered by device manufacturers or carriers, pursuant to their local programs.

Link:

https://www.chromium.org/Home/chromium-security/root-ca-policy#TOC-Root-Certificate-Programs

Mozilla bundle:

https://wiki.mozilla.org/CA:IncludedCAs

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