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I want to pull some podcast downloads off my phone, and put them on my computer.

I have plugged my phone into my computer's USB port. What folder can I find my Google Podcast downloads in? My computer is showing a lot of folders with cryptic names :-(.

I am looking in my computer's file manager, "Nokia 6.1" -> "Internal shared storage". I do not have an SD card in my phone.


My computer runs GNOME. I have connected to the phone using USB (MTP) before, and it worked great. That was for some different files though :-).

Phone version:

  • Device name: Nokia 6.1
  • Model & Hardware: TA-1050
  • Android version: 9
  • Security patch level: 1 October 2019
  • Kernel version: 4.4.153-perf+
  • Build number: 00WW_3_54H_SP03

I bought the phone as new, and I have not rooted it.

  • @Firelord I'm not asking where apps store data. I'm asking where this specific app stores a specific type of data. – sourcejedi Nov 11 at 22:30
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    I get it what you are trying to say, but I see no point in keeping X amount of questions lying around when the dupe target already answers them. All the user has to do is to take a step and see in which location (among the ones suggested by answers there) their target data might be lying. In a way, this as well answers where FB stores downloads, where a slides app stores slides, etc. Feel free to argue. If you feel the question should still remain open, you can also argue on meta site. :) – Firelord Nov 12 at 1:23
  • @Firelord Apart from how I am expected to associate com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox with Google Podcasts, the duplicate can't possibly answer my question. It doesn't mention /data/0/ anywhere, and that's the only path to accessing these files over USB. – sourcejedi Nov 12 at 12:38
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    @sourcejedi Mapping an app label to its package name is a separate question. Why Google Podcasts (com.google.android.apps.podcasts) is saving its data to Google app's (com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox) directory is a separate question (how and why Google's apps rely on each other and how apps share data with each other by sharing UID or using other methods). Accessing /data (/data/0?) over MTP is an impossible case. So in my humble opinion your question doesn't contribute anything new to community which isn't already answered. – Irfan Latif Nov 12 at 13:29
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data/user/0/com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox/filesvelour/feature_data/wernicke_player/downloaded_episodes


Found using the Disk Space Analyzer on my GNOME computer :-).

This is the only folder that appears in data/user/0/.

Apparently, there are a lot of other folders that might look similar, but would not be accessible by other non-system Android apps, and would not be expected to be accessible through USB either. But my Android is quite happy for me to access this specific folder through USB.

I have enabled "Developer options", but I have not used it to change anything AFAIR. If I disabling "Developer options", I can still plug my phone in and access the above folder using USB.

  • Unless I'm mistaken /data/user/0 corresponds to /data/data/ which can be accessed by a user only through root. – Firelord Nov 11 at 11:20
  • @Firelord ? I completed my task successfully. I don't run the GNOME file browser on my laptop as root, that's a terrible idea and is/was absolutely not necessary :-). – sourcejedi Nov 11 at 22:31
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    As @Firelord said /data/user/0 is actually /data/data. Any directory inside that is either accessible to root (UID 0) or system (UID 1000; can see directory only) or the app itself. SELinux restrictions are in addition to this. Which Android version are you on? – Irfan Latif Nov 11 at 23:24
  • @IrfanLatif If someone tells me they've tested this, accessing their own phone's internal filesystem over a USB cable, I'll dig up my exact software version. (Seems to me like the USB MTP host is running with all necessary privileges). – sourcejedi Nov 12 at 8:34
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    Android/data is /storage/emulated/0/Android/data which is obviously accessible to apps as well as MTP (which is also in fact an app). The point is that /data or any of it's subdirectories (except app's own private directory) are not and should not be accessible to apps, adb, MTP or any other possible access method. Such open access breaks Android's security model and must be considered a high priority security vulnerability. – Irfan Latif Nov 12 at 13:16

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