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What is the explanation offered by manufacturers and vendors for why this is the case?

Have there been legal challenges to this practice?


For instance, I can't remove the apps 'Facebook' (not OS-related), 'Analytics' and some non-essential apps by the phone's manufacturer.

Using the network protocol feature of the NetGuard firewall I can see that very frequently data is (attempted to) being sent via these apps. I have not investigated the content of the data being sent but maybe somebody else will do so for common system-apps and phone models until new Android alternatives exist.

Furthermore, is there a way to disable such apps in a way that has similar results on phone performance, security and privacy as uninstalling them (like sandboxing the app) without rooting the device and using default Android OS on the hardware?

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    System apps reside on the system partition which is by default on Android read-only. With root permissions you can remount the partition to read-write and thus delete the file(s) that belong to a system app. For how to disable system apps without root see here: android.stackexchange.com/q/182118/2241
    – Robert
    Jun 9 at 16:08
  • What is the explanation offered by manufacturers and vendors for why this is the case? Have there been legal challenges to this practice? -- first question is too broad. There are way too many vendors from which to search the web and get an explanation from. It would also invite opinionated answers too. Second question is off-topic (legal issues).
    – Firelord
    Jun 10 at 10:59
  • Android apps are sandboxed already. See this and this answer for more information.
    – Firelord
    Jun 10 at 11:00
  • For the sandboxing I meant sandboxing in a way that makes sure the app can not access any data, any smartphone functionality and connect to the Internet in any way ever. I was asking about official explanations. The legal issues part is related imo.
    – mYnDstrEAm
    Jun 10 at 11:24

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