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I am thinking about rooting my Moto Droid but I don't know much about the subject, I've been doing some reading, but I'd like to know:

  • If I were to root and then wanted to unroot later on for some reason would my phone return to the state that it was before I rooted?

  • Also, if I were to "brick" my Droid is there any means of bringing it back to life?

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Check out Are there any risks to rooting a device?

and Unroot a device without wiping

and How easy is it to return to stock after rooting with unrevoked

Also, if i were to "brick" my droid is there any means of bringing it back to life?

It depends. There's bricking, and then there's really bricking.

If i were to root and then wanted to unroot later on for some reason would my phone return to the state that it was before i rooted?

Not completely -- but you can unroot it -- that is, revoke root permissions. If you used root to uninstall OEM apps -- those are still gone. If you installed apps that require root, those will not function w/o root permissions.

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Basically you would take a NANDROID backup (which is a image of your device as it is) immediately after you root your phone. Then at any point in time you can revert back to this backup, and unroot your phone. Also: Clockwork Recovery will actually let you push an unrooted stock image of Android back onto your Droid phone.

As to bricking: you should be able to get yourself out of any tricky situation you might get yourself into. But if you follow all instructions, etc. you shouldn't have any problems. If you do have problems, try googling or referring to the XDA forums (the people there really focus on mods, hacking, etc. for Android phones and might be able to help you out). There are only a few ways to really brick your phone (installing the wrong cell radio for the phone would be one, for example).

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Root access is not permanent, so if you install apps that demand root access, you should know that they are working because the root access is still available. Once you remove root, those apps will fail because they won't find the same access the used earlier, except for removed system apps. It can't come back because root access isn't a recovery or restore point.

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