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My Galaxy s3 suffered from what seems to be the "sudden death syndrome". It had been turning off once in a while and wouldn't turn back on unless I removed and the battery and put it back in. But the last time it turned off it would not turn back on. When I connect my phone to the PC, the PC will make a sound recognizing the device has been connected but does not read it. When charging the phone to a wall socket, nothing happens. But if I remove the battery and connect it to either the outlet or the PC, the red led goes on. The battery isn't the problem though because I tried a different galaxy s3 battery and it did not work. I sent my phone to Samsung for repair under warranty but my question is whether they will be able to tell if the device is rooted despite the phone not turning on at all. Thanks a lot for the help!

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    Supposing they know and cause trouble, check the law where you are. In the EU for example, they can't use this as an excuse unless they can show that you caused the problem. For all they know you rooted your phone to try and solve the sudden death problem they admit exists. – user5506 Jun 18 '13 at 17:45
  • Thanks for answering. I'm not worried about any legal problems though, I'm worried about Samsung wanting to charge me for fixing it since rooting voids your warranty. I was wondering if, since the phone is dead and CANNOT connect to a PC, if they would just change the motherboard, instead of fixing it, and any trace of rooting would get lost with it (rooting is done in the motherboard right?). I'm rooted but running stock. Thanks again! Oh!..and I live in Canada. – joel Jun 19 '13 at 1:07
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    I wasn't talking about you being sued by Samsung! I was talking about them trying to get out of fixing their fault for free. They might suggest that you broke it by rooting it, and I'm suggesting that, depending on where you live, they aren't allowed to get out of their obligations to you as a consumer quite so easily. – user5506 Jun 19 '13 at 8:46
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If you can connect to the device from a PC then they will most likely be able to tell. It might not matter though because they might not look for that and unless they intentionally look to see if its rooted they will not know. Also like @Poldie said they might not legally be able to do anything about it depending on where you live.

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    Thanks for answering. I'm not worried about any legal problems though, I'm worried about Samsung wanting to charge me for fixing it since rooting voids your warranty. I was wondering if, since the phone is dead and CANNOT connect to a PC, if they would just change the motherboard, instead of fixing it, and any trace of rooting would get lost with it (rooting is done in the motherboard right?). I'm rooted but running stock. Thanks again! Oh!..and I live in Canada. – joel Jun 19 '13 at 1:08
  • "I'm worried about Samsung wanting to charge me for fixing it since rooting voids your warranty. " This isn't necessarily true, hence my comments earlier. – user5506 Jun 19 '13 at 8:47
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They will know probably after they fix it. If you rooted it and used a different firmware on the device they can recognize the changes from it's previous memory.

  • Thanks for answering.I'm worried about Samsung wanting to charge me for fixing it since rooting voids your warranty. I was wondering if, since the phone is dead and CANNOT connect to a PC, if they would just change the motherboard, instead of fixing it, and any trace of rooting would get lost with it (rooting is done in the motherboard right?). I'm rooted but running stock. Thanks again! – joel Jun 19 '13 at 1:09
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    Rooting is done by the internal memory of the device. The only thing you should hope for is that their procedure requires an internal memory wipe. You can respond here after you get your device back. – wtvsdfe Jun 19 '13 at 13:28
  • Ok, I'll let you know! – joel Jun 19 '13 at 16:03

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