0

I was looking for a reliable list of available Android browsers for the purpose of comparing features, standards support, engines, and the like. At first I thought something like this would be pretty easy to find! (Spoiler: I was wrong)

A Google search for "List of Android web browsers" returned blogs, a few arbitrary "Top 10" lists, and outdated forum posts. (Along with a mix of unrelated results).

The highly informative Wikipedia article titled List of web browsers includes many mobile browsers. However, the article does not explicitly specify which platforms the browsers are available on.

That "Mobile" section of the article above contains a link to Wikipedia's Mobile Browser article, which has a section titled Popular Mobile Browsers which also does not specify platforms.

Compro01 Points out that there is a limited list immediately blelow the "Popular Mobile Browsers" list for "Microbrowsers", which includes platform availability. Unfortunately, it's a very limited list.

Searching for "Web browser" in the Play Store returns a lot of results which are not very well-suited to at-a-glance comparison.

Does anybody know if/where a curated list of Android browsers, perhaps with some information about features/etc, exists? (Please don't just respond with your personal browser of choice!)

  • A downvote already! Let me know how I can edit the question to fall more in line with the guidelines, or perhaps point me to a better place to ask. – dotVezz Oct 10 '13 at 17:36
  • Wikipedia's article on mobile browsers has a list including platform availability. No feature details though, just the engines. – Compro01 Oct 10 '13 at 17:57
  • Ah, interesting. I didn't give any regard to the Microbrowsers section. That's definitely something! Unfortunately, there are only 7 Android browsers listed there. It's more than nothing though. – dotVezz Oct 10 '13 at 18:03
  • What's the purpose of the comparison? – Lie Ryan Oct 10 '13 at 20:11
  • The end goal is to ensure wide compatibility of a mobile version of an ecommerce site, and I'm most concerned about adherence to HTML5 standards, Javascript engines, and rendering engines. Additionally, having an idea of the update cycle of various browsers would be a plus. An ideal list would have all this information. Barring that unrealistic case, since our team has some Android phones to test with, simply a large list of Android browsers (Outside of the obvious) to test on our devices would be the next-best thing. – dotVezz Oct 10 '13 at 20:34
1

Well, I've wound up using alternativeto.net to specify alternatives to a specific browser, and limiting the results to Android. It's not perfect, but it's actually very workable.

It gives me a list that is fairly comprehensive, gives me an idea of user base numbers, and also includes enough at-a-glance information to help me a bit.

0

Based on your comment, are you looking for these things?

You can either use real Android device or lookup existing Internet resources to examine the code.

P.S. Do not ever attempt to use Android emulator to perform testing. As it is not reliable at all.

HTML5 Compatibility Table List

Desktop and mobile browsers

http://caniuse.com/

Desktop, tablet, mobile, television and gaming browsers

http://html5test.com/compare/browser/index.html

Mobile browsers

http://mobilehtml5.org/

CoreMob (www.coremob.org): Mobile Web App Profile

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuIhlK0fCwP4dEFPR1pUWHk1QVczcV9xbFAtX19CMXc#gid=0

Test it yourself

Ringmark (Mobile Browser Test Suite by Facebook)

http://rng.io/

  • While this is certainly an interesting and useful set of resources, none are quite what I'm looking for. Ideally, there would be a very similar list, but as a comprehensive list of Android browsers (Chrome, Android Browser, Firefox, Dolphin, Skyfire, Opera Movile, Opera Mini, and the dozens of other android web browsers). In the end, I've just resorted to downloading every web browser I can find in the Play Store and testing - unfortunately, this doesn't easily give me all the information I want. However, individual wikipedia pages for each browser (that has one) are quite helpful. – dotVezz Oct 11 '13 at 12:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.