Hot answers tagged

22

Whether or not you can use a phone on a specific carrier depends on a variety of factors, but it is generally possible to figure it out provided that you can find enough information on the device and carrier you are interested in. The main points to focus on will be the cellular standard the carrier uses, the frequency bands it uses, and the associated bands/...


5

Simple answer: No. 3G (also called UMTS) is a different techology than 4G (also called LTE). Both technologies don't share any common base technology (starting with the frequencies and going over to the encoding technologies). So your carrier has two different nets, one with 3G and another with 4G. If you are lucky being near a 4G base station you have an ...


5

Yes, it has HSPA+ which is what T-Mobile's "4G" actually stands for. This article on AndroidAuthority should help you understanding why it doesn't have LTE.


5

It seems that this answer (by Void) worked well for OP. You can setup your device to connect to "4G LTE" only by using the following steps: In dialer, press *#*#4636#*#* Go to Phone Information Scroll down to Set preferred network type: and tap the entry below it. Choose LTE only. Optionally: Tap Turn off radio → Turn on radio Or, If you cannot ...


4

Is that true? Yes, this is true. The USA is currently using the 700, 800 (Sprint only, I think), 1700 and 1900 MHz bands for LTE service, whereas European providers are using 800, 900, 1800, and 2600 MHz (Wikipedia). If it's true, can the US variant be persuaded to work in the UK, 4G-wise? I'm not shy of flashing custom ROMs and so forth. No. The ...


4

You could make your phone to act as a VPN Gateway Requirements: root vpn server (can obtain any free openVPN from playstore) Using a VPN gateway will make tethered traffic to go through the VPN. Steps Turn on portable hotspot Open terminal as root and enter the following codes (you can paste them) iptables -t filter -F FORWARD iptables -t nat -F ...


3

Often times, one of the main differences between Android phone models is the supported frequency bands. This can be because they simply use different antennas for different bands, or because they support completely different network standards (e.g. CDMA and GSM versions). It is not uncommon for devices to be released with completely different names on ...


3

If you get a device working on a specific carrier or not depends on the following factors: cellular standards and frequency bands artificial locks on the device and sometimes willingness of the carrier First, check what your future carrier and phone have. For carrier networks and frequencies Wikipedia is the most complete source I know: http://en....


3

An "LTE band", or any other type of "band" that you read about with relation to a phone, is referring to the radio frequencies that the phone picks up. Each cellular provider builds their network on a specific set of radio frequencies which are divided up into chunks that are assigned band numbers. So, using your T-Mobile example, band 4 is specifically ...


3

LTE bands are the bands of radio spectrum that the cellular networks run on. There are 44 defined bands and different carriers in different areas use different bands to provide service. Wikipedia has a fairly extensive list of who uses what bands. Yes, T-Mobile operates on band 4 (aka AWS), so any other band capability on the device would go unused. If you ...


3

Phones based on Qualcomm Snapdragon, like the padfone X, have their band settings stored in NVRAM, in a field called rf_bc_config. This will be set in the factory to match the band choices embedded into the hardware (radio components in the RF front-end on the device). The value can be readout using Qualcomm service tools like QPST or QXDM, but it is not a ...


3

Call the Service Menu : with *#0011# and then hit (menu) Back and then (menu) Key Input and enter Q0000 and wait. Select UMTS -> Debug Screen -> Phone Control -> Network Control -> Band Selection -> Automatic Done. May be restart the phone.


3

I got this working today. I bought an Asus RT-AC68P router. It works out of the box. I just connected my phone to the router's USB 3.0 port using a normal phone usb cable (same one used for charging, etc.). All Asus routers have the same firmware, so this should work "out of the box" with any new-ish Asus router. I am not impressed with the Asus setup ...


3

your phone doesn't support 4G it supports 3G++ which almost 4g and supports high speed downloads , the short unswer to your question is you can't use the 4g plan proposed by your carrier due to your phone's hardware limitation. the bright side is HSPA+ is not so bad you will not notice the difference.


3

On Android 4.4, there is an option "Avoid poor connections" under Settings->Wi-Fi->Advanced(perhaps under the menu). You want to set this option on. This option is not present in Android 6. I'm not sure whether it's present in Android 5.1.


3

I figured them out thanks to here and here. GSM is 2G (on GSM networks) WCDMA is 3G (HSPA) CDMA is 2G (on CDMA networks) EvDo is 3G (on CDMA networks) TD-SCDMA is 3G (UMTS) LTE is 4G (LTE) This PDF (page 16) explains the evolution of the different technologies. Warning: A lot of this terminology is conflated (e.g. "CDMA" can refer to both the channel ...


3

What you are looking for is something like DSDV i.e. Dual SIM Dual VoLTE. Unfortunately, your smartphone does not support it and it will not be possible for Samsung to push an OTA update to enable it. The chipset itself is not capable of connecting both SIM cards to 4G networks at the same time. One has to fall-back to 3G/2G.


2

When connected to LTE, the phone is also separately connected to the GSM network for voice. Voice does not go over LTE so switching your data to WCDMA (HSPA) won't make any difference in the quality of voice calls, unless you are using VOIP calling. There isn't much you can do to boost the signal other than not using a case or if you do, stick to a thin ...


2

The issue is most likely caused by a wrong APN configuration. Though customer care told you their card is "self configurable", this may well be relative: many ROMs (especially custom ROMs like cyanogenmod) come with a built-in list of APNs, which are matched against the provider as specified by the SIM card, and used correspondingly. While those matches ...


2

I don't know of a user interface in Android to enumerate the radio frequencies that the device handles. However, to give you the direct answer you were looking for, the Padfone X lacks UMTS 1700/2100, which is different from the LTE 1700/2100 that it supports.


2

You need both pieces. The LTE radio was disabled, in software, by the 2.0.1700.48 radio firmware update. In order to enable LTE, you'll need to downgrade to an older radio image (2.0.1700.33 or earlier), then use the *#*#4636#*#* dialer code menu to enable LTE. If you try to use the dialer code on the .48 or higher radios, it will not work. If you're ...


2

You can use the code *#*#4636*#*# in caller app, you will find a menu called 'Testing', enter in phone information and then in 'set preferred network type' select 'WCDMA only' or 'GSM only'


2

Here's what I did in my dual sim J1, trial and error...I entered Q and numbers and it didn't bring up DEBUG MODE so I went in Menu > Select> I entered row number 1 and it brought up the Debug mode. So I followed it up to Debug Screen -> Phone Control -> Network Control -> Band Selection. It had for sim slot 1 and 2, I selected sim 1 and it had LTE 1 and 2. ...


2

No, simultaneous voice and LTE data is only available when using VoLTE (aka "Advanced Calling") on the Samsung Galaxy S6. See the Tech Specs on Verizon's store page for the S6 under the ADVANCED CALLING 1.0 heading: Activate Advanced Calling 1.0 to experience Simultaneous Voice & Data Verizon also accounts for this with a note in their Advanced ...


2

I currently have the Alcatel OneTouch Idol 3, and yes it does support band 12. In fact, my phone is currently using band 12 over band 4 which is what my OnePlus One was using, since it doesn't support band 12. One way to check is to download the LTE Discovery app. Or, open your phone's dialer and type *#*#4636#*#* -- this will open up Testing mode. Go to ...


2

Is your phone called the Micromax a350 Canvas Knight? If so, I'm sorry, but your phone DOESN'T support 4G, according to the specs sheet found on gsmarena. Don't be excited to see the LTE in the *#*#4636#*#* options, because that menu lists all the possible bands there is, although your phone might not support all or some of them. The maximum you can ...


2

As far as phone calls are concerned, when you use SIM1 for a phone call, SIM 2 will be unavailable to receive calls or messages. Anybody that tries to call, the call will not go through. As far as Data connection is concerned, when you use SIM1 for Data, and you get a call on SIM2, data connection is automatically put on hold, and will continue when the ...


2

If you keep your mobile data off, it rather depends on coverage: Good 2G coverage? Use that. Your battery will last much longer. Shaky 2G but stable 3G? Use 3G. Same reason: shaky coverage makes the phone permanently switch cell towers, which eats your battery. 2g & 3G shaky, but stable LTE? Well, you guess it. For a more detailed answer backed by "...


2

The "Smart Network Switching" is available since Android 5.0. You can see it in the official changelog here (in "see all features", "connectivity" : «Improved network selection logic so that your device connects only if there is a verified internet connection on Wi-Fi»).


2

Some countries/carriers, e.g. AT&T and T-Mobile call (DC-)HSPA+ "4G" (while HSPA+ is commonly referred to as "3.5G"), while they call real 4G "4G LTE" or simply "LTE". Using phones or such carrier origin with a HSPA+-capable SIM will display "4G".


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible