43

Samsung (and some other manufacturers') devices don't support Adoptable Storage by default. However, there are some workarounds how you can enable it. Some devices will require root, and others don't. If you have a Galaxy A5, J5, J7, On5, choose method 2 (root required). Before proceeding, make sure you have a backup as this will format your SD card. ...


36

If you use this feature, your external SD card is replacing your internal storage. In the process, it will be encrypted. You no longer can "simply unmount" the card to read it in any other device (including a card reader attached to your PC), as in that case the file system would be unreadable in the latter (due to encryption – which is done "for security", ...


26

How to decrypt adopted storage. Your device must be rooted. Using a file browser like ES Explorer, browse to /data/misc/vold. The .key file there is the encryption key of your adopted storage. Open that file with a hex editor to view the 16-byte key. On any GNU/Linux distro you can do this first mount your SD card, in my case SD card was mounted at /dev/...


21

You don't need to root your device but the device i done this with is rooted You need to enabled Developer Options. Enable the USB Debugging option. Make sure your SD card is formatted as portable, then get the adb executable (see our adb tag-wiki for details). Connect your device to your PC and run the adb devices command. If your device is connected ...


18

Having a similar issue, I read through the comments to your question and ended up doing the following based on a hint suggested by Barleyman: Go to Settings > Storage & USB › Internal Storage, click on "Migrate data" to move your data back to internal In case you do not have enough space left on internal to move everything back (which was my case), ...


12

Marshmallow internal storage can be better used with a mixed-format SD card as I also explain in my blog here: http://blog.sam.liddicott.com/2016/02/android-6-semi-adopted-storage.html First, you need adb working. Have SD card inserted and formatted as portable. Eject your SD card from the Storage & USB menu Use "adb shell" to list your adoptable ...


9

Even it does not fully answer the question, here's a guide to decrypt the external storage formatted as internal. You do need to be root on your phone, however. The gist is that we search for strings including the keyword expand and ending with .key within vold using: $ strings vold|grep -i expand --change-name=0:android_expand %s/expand_%s.key /mnt/expand/...


7

This is how I achieved this on a Samsung Galaxy J5 with Marshmallow 6.0.1. It requires a computer running Windows vista/7/8/10: Install the official Samsung drivers on your computer - some other driver variants can cause this process not to work: http://developer.samsung.com/galaxy/others/android-usb-driver-for-windows Install Odin on your computer: https://...


6

There's some interesting pointer found in Decrypting Android M adopted storage (emphasis mine): Android M allows for adoptable storage, which is implemented similarly to internal storage FDE -- using dm-crypt with a per-volume, static 128-bit AES key, stored in /data/misc/vold/. Once the key is extracted from the device, adopted storage can be mounted and ...


5

I have the same phone & same SD card setup. David Coleman has good advice, but here are some additional points. Many apps will not even show the word "Change." That means they cannot be moved to the SD card. Keep looking for ones that do have that word showing. At least on my phone, every time I tapped on "Change" it came back with an error message. ...


5

tl:dr; Go in for SDXC UHS class 1 or A1 cards if you are looking to run apps from Ext SD SD card speeds have two aspects that would impact your proposed use as adoptable-storage ( though your question wrongly assumed that adoptable-storage is available on Lollipop, while it is introduced only from Marshmallow ) Sequential speeds - which are applicable ...


4

I found a solution of this problem. Each time I connect my phone to my computer I have to go to Settings -> Developer options -> Select USB Configuration and select MTP(Media Transfer Protocol). Then I can access the SD card from my computer. It turns out that whenever its needed to connect the phone and the computer this procedure is to be followed.


4

poqdavid's answer is correct. In addition though, you might get the error that your SD card on your device storage is corrupted. If so follow these steps. After you have partitioned the disk and while your SD card is corruped enter In the terminal the following: $> adb shell sm list-volumes all Which will list your volumes, for example: private mounted ...


4

The internal storage doesn't increase itself, but external storage start behaving like internal (you can move apps to it and so), so you can say you have more internal which is used for apps mostly With titanium backup you shouldn't have any problem as with other apps, for TWRP I can't say anything because I didn't have that experience, but since adopting is ...


4

You don't... if the SD card was encrypted adopted storage, and you removed it and factory reset the phone then you have lost all possibility of accessing any information on the SD card. You are better off just to reformat the card and start over. The encryption "key" was stored on the device, but when you factory reset it the encryption key was deleted, it ...


4

For using SD cars as internal storage bare minimum would be Class 10 SD card, but still that is 4-5 times slower (if I remeber corectly) than internal storage at least in my case I presume that on better and flagship phones would be even greater difference. I used some r/w benchmark app from store to test. Also there is UHS 1 and UHS 3 micro SD cards that ...


4

It seems like manufacturers are removing the "Format as Internal" feature on newer phones. Perhaps because it's in their interest to force us to upgrade our devices after running into memory frustrations. So after a long and frustrating process, this eventually method worked for me. I had to make two alterations: I used the MTK ADB driver instead of the ...


4

See App Install Location for what could be the reason When your application is installed on the external storage: The .apk file is saved on the external storage, but all private user data, databases, optimized .dex files, and extracted native code are saved on the internal device memory. (Emphasis Supplied)


3

OK, I think I found out the best setup. Format your SD card as internal memory. Go to Settings > Storage > Internal and open each app. Some apps have a "change" button. Press it to move the app into the SD card. Finally go to Settings > Storage > Internal and on the right corner press Migrate data. At this point, you did all you could.


3

A second answer to have some points more easily accessible. Yes the internal storage is still accessible, to android at least. After you've done "migrate data" to external storage, everything moveable goes to sdcard but some things still remain on internal. On galaxy S5 you can find these in /data/app/ You can reverse the process by opening "internal ...


3

I had the same problem because, although adopted storage is supposed to merge the internal storage with the SD card there is still a distinction between the two and Google Play still seems to want to install apps into the internal storage. When this becomes full we get an "insufficient storage" message. However, it is still possible to move some apps from ...


3

1) will rooting delete the encryption key so that the card can't be accessed? No, actually "rooting" will not delete anything. Rooting is just adding an application for superuser or root-level access. That being said, in order to root your device you must have an unlocked bootloader. Unlocking the bootloader will wipe the entire device, including the ...


3

Though you did not (yet) confirm both devices are rooted, this solution might be of interest for those where they are: Following up to our adoptable-storage tag-wiki, you will find a link to How to decrypt adopted storage? Based on that, the following approach seems feasible: From the original device, extract the encryption key file located in /data/misc/...


3

This question appears to be a duplicate of How to decrypt Adopted Storage? in many regards, but if I understand it correctly, the following things happened and one step makes it unique: You adopted the microSD card as internal storage You removed it from the device (reason isn't relevant) While the microSD card was removed, you factory reset (formatted) ...


3

TL;DR: Yes. Details: By adopting your SD card as internal storage, it was encrypted. The encryption key was stored on the device itself – and thus deleted when you performed the factory-reset. For that reason, the device can no longer decrypt it and read the data stored there. So unfortunately, there is no way to recover the data you had stored on the card,...


3

Your device is very old, which most likely means that it does not have exfat support. Compatibility should not be a problem, as every card and reader are usually compatible with each other, as long as SDXC cards are supported by your device. And for adoptable storage the bulk transfer speed is not that important (as long as you don't record videos or ...


2

You are correct. Android Marshmallow has done away with apps being on the SD card when it's setup as portable storage. The only way to use it in that way is with root and apps like LINK2SD.


2

This is intentional by the Android system. When you format a microSD card to be used as internal storage, 2 things basically happen: The microSD card becomes locked-in to the device (as it is specifically encrypted for the device) The real internal storage (eMMC) becomes invisible to non-root and non-system privileged users. You could still technically ...


2

There is an excellent post on reddit Let's clear up the confusion regarding storage in Android once and for all, including adoptable storage in Marshmallow. But as far as I understand the sticking point is still that developers still control whether their app is movable to SD, in this case the extended internal storage. So you can still run into the ...


2

The card can only be used as internal storage. If you try to eject the card and read it on a computer, it won’t work. All data on the card will also be erased, so you have to take back up anything important first. So there is no way to revert back.


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