We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
19

No. I'll even go to the extent of saying using an Antivirus is of no use if you only install apps from Google Play. But if you install apps from third party sources (i.e APKs, etc.), using an antivirus might actually make sense. But using 2 AVs doesn't make sense in any scenario imho.


16

It is a Spam and it has nothing to do with your Mobile phone. There are many websites out there that use these tactics to persuade users to click on malicious link. Please do not click on "Remove risks now" Avoid visiting such links as much as possible Also, install Adblock plus As of the website, Scamadviser (it reports on the safety of web sites by ...


14

It is possible to have malware on Android, although these usually 'infect' a device through downloading and installing apps from un-reputable and/or warez sites. When installing any app you should review the permissions and not blindly download/install an app simply because it looks ok. It is possible that the message you received is from a malicious app or ...


11

A known issue with running 2 AVs is that they'll consider each other as a potential virus. This has to do with the behaviour of these programs. They scan directories, perform root-operations (if you have installed the AV on a rooted device), and so on. This is true on any system, not only mobile devices. You can in most cases run an AV together with an anti-...


10

I say no, and I have two reasons for that: Always read the required permissions before installing any application, and ensure that this application needs these permissions for its function and not just asks to do some crap on your phone. Do not allow any application to take permission to tamper with your phone information. Installing an anti-virus app will ...


10

In addition to the possibility that bmdixon raised of malware, I'd like to add that it's entirely possible that it's not even necessarily malware, but rather instead social engineering type adware trying to get you to install malware or buy something useless. You often see those types of pop up messages on websites for Windows users, and this sounds very ...


9

You need to go into Settings > Security > Device administrators and uncheck the box next to the AVG app. You will then be able to uninstall the application normally.


7

This has some reasons, let's try to sum them up: Android has an open app market model (there's the more or less curated Play store but you can install apps from other locations (3rd party markets or self built/downloaded)) Android may also not need AntiVirus apps (most problems come from pirated rogue apps with added value piggybacked) iOS has a strictly ...


7

In short: Nothing to worry about, unless you have downloaded an app suggested by the pop-up. In More detail: It's an old issue. You visit a normal website, and suddenly you see pop-ups telling you that your phone has a virus. It's called scareware. It's basically "ads" which scare you into downloading their "anti-virus" apps. Many times, the apps you ...


6

All antivirus applications on all platforms will impact the performance of the device. This is because they intercept your actions and check them for unwanted effects. You say you have installed anti-viruses - plural. If you install more than one such application on any device they will start to check upon each other. This will have a significant ...


6

I doubt that something like an SMS/MMS Virus exists or is "in the wild". If this MMS was really originating from your phone, than this could only be caused by an malicious App. Now, there are two ways how any App can send/receive SMS/MMS: By having the appropriate permissions You can easily find out which App has requested, and since you installed it, ...


5

The entire philosophy of the two competing "App markets" are different. The Android Market, known as Google Play, allows any submitted application. Apps aren't really checked or pre-screened, they're simply submitted, and anyone can download them. Any kind of app can be submitted to the Play store, even one that hooks into the core operating system. This ...


5

It is phishing site, I've just had the same on my Samsung S7, All I did was cleared my chrome browser history and closed all opened pages! Doubled check with a free Avast antivirus run a scan and nothing on my phone at all!


5

Don't worry. These are fake virus scanners. They try to scare you by making you think your device is infected. If you can't exit out of them simply close the browser tab you opened them in. And if you rooted your phone you can download AdAway to remove the ads.


5

Congrats! You won 10 bottles of snake oil if you're lucky. Honestly: this has two very clear indicators of being scam: There are no viruses on Android. And even if there were, how should that website know? Asking you to download an app via their specific link to fix {whatever}. If you do so, then you are in trouble. Ignore that message (close the tab of ...


4

Not usefully. You need different software to run on your Android device to what you run on your Windows desktop because they use completely different formats for programs. An Android program is a different sort of beast to a Windows program. A virus-scanner for Windows understands the format of Windows programs, and has a list of known viruses for Windows. ...


4

Given that McAfee himself (who has had nothing to do with the software for years after selling it to Intel) describes the product as "the worst software on the planet", I'd take the refund and be grateful at dodging that bullet. I won't recommend a particular one, but you could buy six copies of a competing Android security product for what a year's ...


4

On request by OP, some details from chat: Good question, but hard to answer: there are a few more things to consider. it's not just "app based versus USB" – and even your "Difficulty in unrooting" is not necessarily the fault of "app based" in general, but rather that of a specific app causing that difficulty. From a security point of view: if there's an ...


4

There are a few advantages to rooting using the official process. It's officially supported on many phones. This means you can use a process that's documented by the manufacturer, and tools from an official source, or a trustworthy third party (CWM or TWRP), instead of having to run a tool that you got from some dodgy website. Because it's officially ...


4

I went through this same problem. Here is the solution: First boot to safe mode: Press the power button. A Power Off popup will show. Long press the Power Off popup. It will ask if you if you want to boot in safe mode. Press yes. After starting in safe mode, goto Settings > Apps and scroll down to the bottom to find Yellow Booster App. On clicking, you ...


4

Visit a different site (and avoid this one in the future). That's a fake warning wanting to trick you into some download. Definitely do NOT hit that button labeled "Remove virus now" – if you do that, you'll have your device infected with some malware for sure. Don't get irritated by the Google logo, this is not a message from Google (they have other ways ...


4

HTML Viewer is not a virus and you shouldn't be alarmed. Actually it is a core application in most android versions (It's also present on my device running android 4) HTML viewer (as the name suggests) basically lets you read HTML files stored on your device and it occasionally handles some .txt or related extensions of files present on your device and ...


4

tl:dr Yes, you need such apps and more a wholistic approach Breaking down the possible threats (simplistically) : 1.Viruses: They don't exist on Android. See Is an antivirus really needed for Android?. malware : Yes a very real threat that is usually piggy backed on apps or users being lured to click spammy links and download payload. Since you ...


3

Your guess is wrong. Anti-virus applications on Android are completely unrelated. There are two ways that Google finds and removes dodgy apps and malware from Google Play. Reports by users Every Play Store page has a "report" button. Google investigates apps that are reported, whether that's for copyright or trademark issues, violating their policy about ...


3

Uninstalled, then reinstalled Avast. Scans now all clear. Looks like a definite Avast issue.


3

Lots of users reporting about these Trojan warnings. It may be Avast Virus Defenition Update issue. Post From Avast Moderator Update the VPS to 14010901 Source Forum From Google+ found this image. I think its a similar issue.


3

If that is a malware, it will take care to leave no tracks (i.e. deleting the sent message). Two things you should do ASAP: Contact your provider and check what messages where sent. Especially expensive "Premium" messages. It could be something sends "just spam", but it also could be some "money generator". Check with a permission checker what apps have ...


3

If you don't want to root your device, you should be able to see AVG under the 'All' tab in your list of apps. If this is the case, open it and there will be one or both of these options available: 'Uninstall Updates' which will reduce the app size and save you space. 'Disable' which will prevent the app from running and will hide it from the app drawer. ...


3

Thanks to AndrewT who posted a link on chat, having this research paper as a refernce in one of the answers. This answer is entirely based on the this paper (May 2015) and highlights common user understandable aspects ( it has a lot of security related material for those interested) What are the pros and cons apart from above? If a device has both ...


3

DSMLawmo is a Samsung system app that is preinstalled, it is not malware but it does have many of the characteristics of malware likely leading to a false positive detection, the description is: "DSM states for "Dedicated Security Management " Which allows this app to get a full control over the phone using voice channel only... Dsmlawmo is to get ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible