62

As you've already noted, the big.LITTLE combination strategy (technically, HMP, Heterogeneous Multi-Processing clusters) is the primary reason for so many (and sometimes overwhelmingly many) cores. A mobile device often runs into multiple scenarios, both heavy load and light load ones included. An extreme consumer-class example is MediaTek's Helio X20, ...


41

I ended up with this conclusion after searching a lot. Useful info in Unity Stats. ARMv7: 98.1% Intel x86: 1.7% However I was not satisfied so I verified it from many resources. According to Android Documentation. armeabi was deprecated in r16. Removed in r17. No hard float. and Historically the NDK supported 32-bit and 64-bit MIPS, but support was ...


24

Since ultimately you're deciding whether x86 is still worthy of spending effort to support, I'm listing several facts about x86 for Android devices here: Intel had decided to discontinue the Atom line for phones/tablets. The last generation of handheld Atom - x3, x5 and x7 series - were at best equipped on lower-end Chinese Android tablets. Some come with ...


15

The Nexus 5 runs a Snapdragon 800, which is not a 64-bit supported processor. That means you should be going for the arm version of Xposed, and not the arm64 version. NOTE: You are getting confused with the meaning of x86. In this context, x86 refers to mobile processors made by Intel (the Nexus 5 has an "arm" chip). The difference between "arm" and "arm64" ...


15

The reason is as simple as much as complicate. The short answer is "because the mobile phone market has never been and is not driven by Intel". The long answer is way too long to resume here, but the basic concept is that Intel has dominated the PC market for years with all means possible, to the point of paying and corrupting (and being fined for this) to ...


9

There are two factors going on, one very practical and the other historical. The practical reason is the use of mixed architectures in phones. Power consumption is critical for phones and phones spend a lot of time in modes where they require very little performance. It makes sense to have some cores optimized for minimal power consumption when little ...


8

As suspected by OP, the hardware is 64 bit but it is running in 32 bit mode as mentioned in this reddit which in turn refers to geek bench for proof. Apps like AIDA 64 can reveal this Source Also Antutu, if you have it installed, as it is removed from Play Store As general info, see How to find ARM processor version on android device?


7

Here are my incomplete summarized notes on the subject, but enough to answer your question. INSTRUCTION SET: Processors are made of semiconductor dies, usually electronic-grade mono-crystalline silicon. They don't know English or any other human language, they understand only 0 and 1. So the designer of processor tells us in what sequence of zero's and one'...


7

From Google Play Console (supporting a minimum of Android 4.1 and landscape screen): x86: 287 devices arm64-v8a: 3136 devices armeabi-v7a: 11716 devices


6

Rather than wasting time checking your SoC architecture, why not check your ROM's build architecture instead? The following methods are available for you. The existence of /system/bin/linker64 indicates that your ROM is built for ARM64 (or more formally, AArch64), as well as these things File: /system/bin/linker64 /system/bin/app_process64 Directory: ...


5

It's crucial for a phone to be able to provide computational power in short bursts (we need certain apps to be fast) but to also avoid overheating (heat dissipation is much more difficult for phones than for laptops or PCs). In order to accomplish this, architects design phones to use a single core when the workload is light and provide extra cores to boost ...


3

In addition to noexec mount option, /sdcard is emulated filesystem with fixed file permissions. So files can't be set executable. But some file explorers like MiXplorer support executing binaries/scripts from /sdcard through /system/bin/sh. /data/local has permissions 0751, owner root.root 1, so normal apps can't access it. However from adb shell use /data/...


3

Genymotion with ARM translation You can use genymotion (the personal use version is free) with an Oreo ROM + ARM_Translation_Oreo.zip (google the filename to download it). Once you download the zip simply drag-and-drop it into the emulator window, accept the prompt and then reboot the emulator. It's not a lightweight solution since genymotion uses ...


3

This library is part of Intel's Houdini project where ARM native code runs on Intel x86 using an emulation feature named Houdini (see libhoudini Archives). This library basically maps ARM to x86 CPU instructions and its source code is closed (it was pulled from a working Lenovo laptop)source. It reads ARM instructions on the fly and converts them to ...


3

Yes, applications (APKs) are independent of the architecture. Android is made up of 4 major levels. The apps you write is compiled into Dalvik EXecutable (DEX) code, which is finally converted into assembly code (according to the required architecture) by the kernel to send to the processor. So, the kernel is the final one that's responsible to act ...


2

The Google Play Store automatically filters your application to devices with compatible CPU architecture. E.g. if you have a library which is only compiled for ARMv5, your app will only show up for devices with ARMv5 and ARMv7 processors. Your device should show you only apps that are compatible to your device. Source: Android Developers - Filters on Google ...


2

Houdini is a library provided by Intel to convert ARM NEON intrinsics to the corresponding SSE instructions at run-time. It appears that cocos (or your game) is still using NEON even though you're compiling for x86 now. It may be as simple as doing a full rebuild to make sure all object files are recompiled respecting your change to the ABI: ndk-build -B &...


2

The LG Nexus 5X is the first device with Android 6.0(.1) so it's running SDK23. X86 is only for x86 processors, which except for the ASUS Zenfone, no one is using. ARM is for usual 32-bit ARM processors (and 32-bit ROMs). This was the standard about 1/2 to 1 year ago. ARM64 is the newest generation of 64-bit ARM processors and ROMs supporting this ...


2

First, Java virtual machine can historically benefit from multi-core more than typical desktop software. Even if you write a single-threaded app in Java, it will run faster on a multicore because most of the garbage collector code will run alongside with your app. Second, a lot of things are going on in the background on your phone: automatic updates, ad ...


2

No, it's not possible. You need to find a version of the app that was compiled for x86, or without any architecture-specific parts (i.e. Java only).


2

I did some poking around in some custom ROMs for x86 devices, and along with the info provided by @Izzy I think I've figured it out. Example ARM64 device ro.product.cpu.abilist32 armeabi-v7a,armeabi ro.product.cpu.abilist64 arm64-v8a Example ARM device ro.product.cpu.abilist32 armeabi-v7a,armeabi ro.product.cpu.abilist64 Example x86 device ro....


2

To get Google Play Services, devices must follow Android Compatibility Definition Document and since Android 6.0 - Native API Compatibility has required Advanced SIMD (a.k.a. NEON): MUST include support for the Advanced SIMD (a.k.a. NEON) Android 6.0 was released in October 2015. So if the device originally sold with Google Play and included Android 6.0 ...


2

I think you are mistaking the "Kryo" brand from Qualcomm from being different than just a customized version of ARM big.LITTLE. As stated in the Qualcomm Snapdragon 660/630 announcement article from Anandtech: Snapdragon 660’s Kryo 260 CPU uses four semi-custom Cortex-A73 cores in the “performance” cluster and four semi-custom Cortex-A53 cores in the “...


1

Even though Google states that this works for the Android 9 and 10 images as well from my experience it works only for the Android 11 preview images. I have tested this on Windows using the latest default x86 Google enabled images shown in the emulator manager for Android 10 and 11. As test app I used an Telegram armv7 only apk file from 2019: Android-R - (...


1

The number of hardware devices that use x86 was never very high. Some years ago Intel had some x86 processors (Intel Atom) that were used in some Android tablets (e.g. Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.3). However those tablets never reached a high volume on the market. And I am not sure if there is any x86 Smartphone or tablet on the market that still uses an x86 CPU....


1

There is a universal architecture (armeabi-v7a + x86) available at APKmirror repository (Mobdro Version: 2.1.4 (21412604)). This variant is larger in size (33.22 MB) than the arm counterpart. For interest sake, I downloaded it and installed it, it is working fine on my x86 virtual device (API level 22): This was uploaded on May 10, 2018, I guess you ...


1

-ARMv7.apk The version needed with -ARMv7.apk. After downloading that, you have to install it. This may be more difficult than need be because VLC currently has the content-type on the response set wrong, you can read more about that here: Can not install apks from File Manager or browser? You may open the file downloaded from the Download Manager nor ...


1

The answers so far explain some facets of the problem leading to this overwhelmingly many number of CPU cores on Android phones. Read that again; Android phones. The iPhone has managed to stuck to just a couple of cores for ages and still performs much smoother than any Android flagship. The designers of Android made a huge gamble when deciding to chose the ...


1

Some more testing reveals the following. I've done this procedure hundreds of times, so I know the results are an ominous sign. I'm guessing it is a Cortex-A53/ARM-v8a processor, but its configured in 32-bit mode. $ aarch64-linux-android-readelf -h ./cryptest.exe | grep -i 'class\|machine' Class: ELF64 Machine: ...


1

Andrew, if su binary in xbin is proper, then run, adb shell /system/xbin/su -c mv /system/bin/su /system/bin/su-dead then reboot and open terminal emulator and run su. Did this device come pre-rooted? If not then what prevents you from repeating the process you used to root?


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