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65

First Things First You may have some misconceptions about how Android works and what's really happening when a service is running or an app is in the background. See also: Do I really need to install a task manager? Most apps (e.g., ones you launch manually) have their current Activity put into the background when you switch to another app or the ...


51

Found the solution! You have to edit menu.lst file. Here is how: boot in debug mode (usually the second option in boot menu) when booting stops (for me it just hangs there with flashing cursor and without any prompt) enter mount -o remount,rw /mnt enter cd /mnt/grub enter vi menu.lst press Shift+a right under the first boot entry find the line starting ...


23

You will find a good explanation including graphics to visualize what's going on in the article The Android boot process from power on. Basically, the steps are as follows: Execute Boot ROM code. This is stored in a hardware-specific area and keeps information on where to find the first stage of the boot loader, which is then loaded into RAM. You can ...


22

Please clarify what is the intended goal and why? Android phones have their own boot-loaders and cannot be overridden by other means. It is not like a PC's BIOS where you can switch the ordering of boot to boot from certain devices such as Network PXE, USB, Primary/Secondary H.D.D... Edit: After the comments below, and in relation to the OP's question ...


22

To make the system recognize the Android device, in their several modes, one needs to set permissions for his user in udev. You need to repeat this process of loading Android udev IDs, for every mode the phone has (operating system, bootloader or recovery) because they have different USB IDs # reboot into fastboot mode adb reboot bootloader # grab you ...


18

I'm not sure about the configuration setting, but I believe this is not only limited to home screen managers since you can achieve this by using 3rd-party apps. Some related keywords: Startup manager: Google Play Store Autostart: Google Play Store Autorun: Google Play Store Otherwise, you can use automation apps like Tasker: Create a Profile: Event - ...


17

Personally I had to run fastboot as root/sudo for fastboot to detect the device. I tried this on Linux as I don't own a Mac, but it's *NIX anyway ;)


13

I think you have caught yourself out, in short, nothing you can do! Have a look at this source that explains why, specifically in this section: System Partition and Safe Mode The system partition contains Android's kernel as well as the operating system libraries, application runtime, application framework, and applications. This partition is set to ...


13

In this situation you have two options, which I'd try in the given order: Safe Mode Boot into Safe Mode (details for what Safe Mode is and how to boot your device into Safe Mode can be found in the article How to Boot Android 4.1+ into Safe Mode: Method 1: hold down Power button until the power-menu pops up press and hold the "restart" option in the ...


13

For future reference, this was my related case (involving a Nexus 4): I tried to bring my phone back to the original state (bootloader locked + stock rom). Now fastboot devices did not show the device where adb device did, until I put the phone in fastboot mode (this makes sense, but took me a while to figure out...) To put the Nexus 4 in fastboot mode: ...


13

The Application Bootloader ABOOT boots the Android kernel/Recovery kernel. It is the mechanism to download images onto the device from a host machine (like Windows/Linux PC). On Samsung devices it runs the ODIN protocol on the device. The Primary Bootloader boot part is a computer program that loads the main operating system or runtime environment for ...


11

Single user boot is a feature of the init daemon (initd, like sysVinit) and not the Linux kernel. Since Android only shares the kernel with Linux and not the init process, a genuine single user boot can not be achieved. Android has something that is called "Recovery Mode", but it's not exactly the same as a single user boot on an Unix system. The approach ...


11

OK. I found the correct combination. It seems that the recovery distributed with Cyanogenmod 10 M2 for galaxysmtd is really picky about the hardware buttons. Here's how you can boot to recovery: Start with Galaxy S powered off Press and hold Volume up + Home Press and hold Power button Wait for (factory default) Galaxy S GT-I9000 boot display to show up ...


10

What needs to be done is to bundle the boot.img and construct a new zip file suitable for flashing via ClockworkMod or TWRP. Pre-requisites: a Linux environment that has the usual development packages, such as Java installed. (It can also apply to other platforms, just be careful that the instructions here indicating the path used below, uses a forward ...


10

Few years back, I worked on Android boot time optimization, as a Android developer. Obviously, as part of this work, we first needed to analyse where Android spends time during booting. Below is the brief findings: Hardware used : OMAP3430 Board which is like development board on which Stock Android is flashed. On actual commercial/production device, ...


8

Boot process of embedded system is similar to PC from overview level, but slightly different from microscopic level. Here's the boot process of an Android device: PC-BIOS/BootMonitor, MBR and GRUB/LILO etc are all combined in one Boot Strap Firmware called Bootloader. Its init.S initializes stacks, zeros the BSS segment and calls _main() in main.c. The ...


8

If you have been waiting an excessive amount of time for your phone to boot (eg. leaving it overnight to boot) but it is still at the boot animation, you may be in bootloop. This is when the phone fails to boot due to some errors in the /system partition. As a preliminary measurement, you should perform a factory reset (or wipe /data) to see if that helps. ...


7

When your phone is not turned on it can't have a adb service running (Disregarding the possible technical difficulties it would also be a security issue.) Try the following instead: 1. Take out your battery and connect the phone to a charger 2. Your phone should now turn on. 3. Insert your battery. It worked on my current and on my previous phones (ZTE ...


7

Android runs the Linux Kernel for the core system and it can be (and is) optimized for various platforms (compiled for ARM, x86, x64, PPC, etc). Here is a fantastic graphic to demonstrate this for you: Source: Post on Unix.SE Android relies on Linux version 2.6 for core system services such as security, memory management, process management, network ...


7

I had the same problem with InFocus M512, recognized by adb but not by fastboot when in download mode. I've found that specifying vendor ID with -i works (0xID). fastboot -i 0x0489 worked for me.


7

Posting this not so much for the asker, since it was asked ten hours ago, but for others who find this question: Lollipop's first boot can take a long time. On my Nexus 4, after the OTA update from 4.4.4, it took about half an hour. At least 10 minutes of this was spent in the "flying colours" boot screen. I'd make sure it has power, and leave it for at ...


7

I'd like to extend and improve @Jay Smith answer based on personal experience. He is right in the core thing that the cause of the issue is VGA resolution used by Android, but he is wrong in his assumption it is disposable fix and should be typed at each boot. It can be made persistent, and should be! And I show you how:) First of all, install the Android ...


7

NO AFAIK Fundamental reason is usage and the design that evolved based on it- mobile phone as the name suggests are meant to be used whenever and wherever, with periodic charging, unlike laptops, which are designed to work with / without being plugged in to power. It seems technically possible, to work without a battery, if you build an electric circuit ...


6

Is a different version of the Recovery really needed for different OS versions? No. In case of updating custom ROMs you're completely right in that the recovery is mostly* independent of the ROM used. However, phone manufacturers sometimes push out updates that change some vital parts of the phone. For example, repartition the phone. This is why sometimes ...


6

Not the best answer but maybe the information will be some what useful. The only method I'm aware of that contains a log produced by the system after a reboot is /proc/last_kmsg. Whether or not the kernel keeps this log file after a reboot, depends on settings provided during kernel compilation. My experience has shown that some stock devices (HTC) have ...


6

It is possible in a sense, however. Given the limitations mentioned in @t0mm13b 's answer, it makes sense that the mentioned boot loader (lk) is incapable of doing this. So, we boot a custom kernel from fastboot (for testing), which boots, enables OTG functionality and once a valid kernel is found on the OTG device which is connected, chainloads that into ...


6

The bootloader is not generally on the /boot partition, it's on a separate one, although that's not really the crux of the issue. The problem occurs when the bootloader is cryptographically signed, which is intended to prevent you from replacing it with your own. The device will check the signature of the bootloader at startup and refuse to boot one with an ...


6

Real Reboot Works on Android 2.1 - 4.2.1 No Root 4.2.2 and up needs root. For a PC method you will be using Android Debug Bridge, commonly called ADB. Here is a link for a download. It's from the XDA Forums. Read the page while your there and get some good insight on ADB. After installed to the computer, open a command prompt (L shift + R mouse click) in ...


6

When you use fastboot boot FILE.img, the image is downloaded and written into the RAM and than the normal procedure to boot a boot.img is followed. No changes to any partition takes place. If the image is invalid or cannot be booted into, the boot process automatically falls back to the image in the boot partition. Once the temporary kernel is booted into, ...


5

Since Android 4.2.2, [USB debugging requires authentication], something that is not possible during boot. To disable this, set the following property in default.prop (inside initrd): ro.adb.secure=0 Alternatively, copy ~/.android/adbkey.pub into the initial ramdisk of the boot/recovery image at /adb_keys. This preserves the secure feature while granting ...


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