18

You'll need to use fastboot, which is provided in the CF-Auto-Root zip file, and also available standalone and packaged with lots of other software. It's part of the Android SDK Tools / Platform Tools, which can be installed on Windows, OSX, or Linux. Note: If you've installed a custom ROM or kernel on top of rooting, you'll want to flash the necessary ...


11

This can be marked a duplicate of questions like this, but it's a device-specific question. It cannot be answered in a generic way, should be “How to root XYZ Android device without unlocking bootloader?” Simple answer is: It should not be possible to root Android devices without unlocking bootloader, but is possible for some devices due to security ...


7

Qualcomm 9008 mode is for emergency repairs as a last resort - without it your phone could remain bricked under certain situations. However, in case of Xiaomi phones, even if you flashed the phone under this mode, the account lock (if there is any) will still be persistent and you won't be able to use any services related to it (i.e. Cloud). The original ...


4

For Sony's specific case, it's because Sony has proprietary technology (X-Reality color management, BIONZ image processor, active noise cancelling techniques) for its stock camera that uses DRM security keys. When the bootloader is unlocked, the keys that reside on TA partition are removed, thus disabling the features. The use of proprietary technology also ...


4

Android devices always delete all user data when unlocking the bootloader. This is a requirement by Google which has to be implemented by each and every device. In the past there were a few devices that did not perform a full wipe or had other bugs, but as far as I remember Google Nexus/Pixel devices were never affected by such problems. Therefore I would ...


4

They aren't related at all Unlocked phones refer to phones that aren't bound to any carrier. It looks like you are mixing this up with bootloader-lock, whose tag wiki says Some bootloaders are locked by the manufactures to prevent the phones from booting unofficial firmware images. (Read the wiki and linked questions for more information) These two are ...


4

Rooting is the process to modify core OS components so that apps/processes can be run with high privileges (UID 0). See details in How Magisk works? and How to manually root a phone? Rooting is not itself locked or unlocked. But Unlocking Bootloader is usually a prerequisite. Bootloaders are the initial components which load on device boot. OEMs lock them so ...


3

I found this link after hours of searching and trying to unbrick my phone. Just type here https://imei24.com/ your IMEI number and it will show you all the info, hope it helps :) BR!


3

I cannot speak for other devices but Motorola Nexus 6 will show you a warning that userdata would be destroyed. The warning is shown both on the shell and on the device's screen. See screenshots: It is to be noted that the warning would show up only when OEM unlock setting is enabled under Developer options. If it is disabled and you attempt to re-lock the ...


3

As Firelord asked me to sum things up, here we go: First, you cannot do a backup using fastboot. Fastboot is like a one-way road: you can only use it to write partitions (either by flashing a corresponding image, or by wiping it) – but you cannot "pull" a partition. Which leaves ADB. Yes, it's possible via ADB – but it will require root. As Firelord ...


3

Just relocking won't work, you need to restore the TA partition (which contains DRM keys for Bravia Engine) that you must have backed up before unlocking your bootloader.


3

On a rooted device, you can use BootUnlocker to re-lock the bootloader without using fastboot. You can also use it to unlock the bootloader again without wiping data. I use it to keep my bootloader locked most of the time, but unlock it prior to installing a system update or doing anything else that might require re-rooting via fastboot flash.


3

Toggling the setting in Developer Options does nothing but allow the bootloader to be unlocked, however actually unlocking the bootloader will wipe all data, just toggling the setting in Developer Options will not. It would be more proper to call the setting "OEM Unlocking is Allowed". Otherwise here might be a good place to start looking for more ...


3

As far as I am aware of, the Nokia Android phones by HMD Global does not allow unlocking bootloader. I have also stated the same in another answer. So you're out of luck, at least for the time being. Reference: XDA Developers


3

On recent Android devices, when you have Factory Reset Protection, which is enabled automatically when you setup a Google account, custom binaries (the files that are not signed by the OEM) are blocked (custom recoveries, boot, etc) for security reasons as one can bypass that lock and gain access to your data. So disabling OEM lock in the Developer ...


3

Most device will prompt an Yes/No UI, and the user can press Volume Up/Down to choose an option, and press power to comfirm. "fastboot oem unlock-go" will skip the prompt. But no all device support this command.


3

Since OEM unlocking is not enabled in Developer options, and the bootloader is not unlocked, your options a limited. The first (although not preferred option in most cases) is to contact Google support for an RMA on your device to get a replacement. This is usually a simple thing and they usually handle it quite well. You can find information on this to ...


2

The bootloader being locked has nothing to do with whether it's SIM-locked to a particular network. It just means you can't flash a custom ROM to the device (without unlocking the bootloader). You don't need to unlock the bootloader to change SIM to a different network, but if it's SIM-locked to a particular network, you need to unlock it from that network. ...


2

You can flash a stock Sony rom on to your device by using flash tool just Google it, then you find a stock ftf rom and you can flash it without unlocking the bootloader.


2

Linux is absolutely the best way to do this sort of things. This is a thread on xda about how to set the development environment on Linux Ubuntu in particular http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2302780 Follow these steps and you'll have fastboot command set up to do the unlocking process. Plus you won't need any driver to let the system ...


2

A factory reset will not change the status of the phone with regards to "device lock" (Can I connect to other networks?) or to "bootloader lock" (Can I use custom ROMs?).


2

ADB devices was detecting the phone, but fastboot devices wasn't. I had to do the following to get it to work on Win 7 64bit: Reboot Win7 and Press F8 on boot screen and select: Disable Driver Signing Boot phone into bootloader Device Manager you should see an Unknown Device popup Manually install the driver by selecting: android > android adb (screenshot) ...


2

On Nexus 6P the bootloader relocking method is contains the Factory Reset, there is nothing to do. If you are trying to relock your device you should see a screen like this: image. If you want to keep your files and data you should make a backup and when your device bootloader agian locked you restore it. This is a normal behaviour but for example on OP2 ...


2

In my search, I came across an interesting thread that was related, but in order to install their script, you need to have a custom recovery tool installed or to be able to boot into it (e.g. fastboot boot recovery.img). I had the stock Cyanogen Recovery tool and I couldn't boot into TWRP because of my actual problem (cannot unlock bootloader anymore), so I ...


2

According to the CyanogenMod Wiki, you should be able to flash each partition separately – if you've got an image for it. Quoting: Common fastboot commands fastboot flash recovery recovery.img fastboot flash boot boot.img fastboot flash cache cache.img fastboot flash userdata userdata.img fastboot flash system system.img Following this list ...


2

It is still kind of unclear what you exactly mean. In general: a factory resets formats the whole userdata(data) partition. The data partitions contains your installed apps, databases where your customized settings for the android system are stored(for example if you changed your homescreen; added some shortcuts/widgets etc.). Also the cache of the virtual ...


2

You need to get the "cid" of the device by doing ./adb reboot bootloader sudo ./fastboot getvar all In my case it gives (bootloader) cid: 0x0001 and as you can see at the official website, Lenovo/Motorola says "Your device is NOT eligible for bootloader unlock". You buy their phone and they still control it. Wait, what?


2

It doesn't wipe the OS (the system partition), only the user data. It's a precaution so that an attacker can't install a new OS to get around Android's security protections on your data. See Why does unlocking the bootloader wipe phone? for more details on why. When you first boot the device after unlocking the bootloader, if you don't flash a new OS right ...


2

First, I want to tell you that relocking the bootloader will NOT get rid of that message... On the Moto G3, once the bootloader has been unlocked that message will always appear, forever. That being said, you can flash a custom boot logo to cover the warning. I will explain how to relock the bootloader and fix the logo though. To successfully relock the ...


2

I am sick of seeing this on boot screen. How do I disable it? I too was annoyed by the hysterical warning. As other users answered already, while relocking wouldn't get rid of or skip it, the screen image can be easily reflashed back to stock. I want to expand on this and show how this screen can be given a custom boot screen, way less alarming and fitting ...


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