66

Found the solution! You have to edit menu.lst file. Here is how: boot in debug mode (usually the second option in boot menu) when booting stops (for me it just hangs there with flashing cursor and without any prompt) enter mount -o remount,rw /mnt enter cd /mnt/grub enter vi menu.lst press Shift+a right under the first boot entry find the line starting ...


23

Please clarify what is the intended goal and why? Android phones have their own boot-loaders and cannot be overridden by other means. It is not like a PC's BIOS where you can switch the ordering of boot to boot from certain devices such as Network PXE, USB, Primary/Secondary H.D.D... Edit: After the comments below, and in relation to the OP's question Is ...


22

To make the system recognize the Android device, in their several modes, one needs to set permissions for his user in udev. You need to repeat this process of loading Android udev IDs, for every mode the phone has (operating system, bootloader or recovery) because they have different USB IDs # reboot into fastboot mode adb reboot bootloader # grab you ...


16

Personally I had to run fastboot as root/sudo for fastboot to detect the device. I tried this on Linux as I don't own a Mac, but it's *NIX anyway ;)


15

The Application Bootloader ABOOT boots the Android kernel/Recovery kernel. It is the mechanism to download images onto the device from a host machine (like Windows/Linux PC). On Samsung devices it runs the ODIN protocol on the device. The Primary Bootloader boot part is a computer program that loads the main operating system or runtime environment for ...


14

For future reference, this was my related case (involving a Nexus 4): I tried to bring my phone back to the original state (bootloader locked + stock rom). Now fastboot devices did not show the device where adb device did, until I put the phone in fastboot mode (this makes sense, but took me a while to figure out...) To put the Nexus 4 in fastboot mode: ...


13

The instructions don't make mention of the setting in the device's developer options. Make sure to enable the "OEM unlocking" setting there:


12

The boot-loader code is stored within the /boot partition. Majority of Android handsets uses the Qualcomm's Boot Loader, called LK (Little Kernel), barring Samsung, which uses their own form of boot-code. LK has the following: Variety of nand devices for bootup USB driver to enable upgrading images over usb during development Keypad driver to enable ...


10

SHORT ANSWER: Android phones are more brickable than PCs because they can hardly communicate with us if the bootloader is erased. And bootloader(s) live on Flash memory (eMMC) partitions which are prone to deletion quite easily (even during an update process). If you unluckily damage these partitions or they are worn out, there is a great chance you won't ...


9

I'd like to extend and improve @Jay Smith answer based on personal experience. He is right in the core thing that the cause of the issue is VGA resolution used by Android, but he is wrong in his assumption it is disposable fix and should be typed at each boot. It can be made persistent, and should be! And I show you how:) First of all, install the Android ...


8

Yes. Locking the bootloader is possible after you have installed a custom firmware. A locked bootloader will not allow you to ad-hoc boot custom binaries (using fastboot boot boot.img and will not allow you to directly write to the flash chips. An unlocked bootloader however does offer you this and newly available commands are: fastboot flash partition ...


8

If you have been waiting an excessive amount of time for your phone to boot (eg. leaving it overnight to boot) but it is still at the boot animation, you may be in bootloop. This is when the phone fails to boot due to some errors in the /system partition. As a preliminary measurement, you should perform a factory reset (or wipe /data) to see if that helps. ...


7

I had the same problem with InFocus M512, recognized by adb but not by fastboot when in download mode. I've found that specifying vendor ID with -i works (0xID). fastboot -i 0x0489 worked for me.


7

Posting this not so much for the asker, since it was asked ten hours ago, but for others who find this question: Lollipop's first boot can take a long time. On my Nexus 4, after the OTA update from 4.4.4, it took about half an hour. At least 10 minutes of this was spent in the "flying colours" boot screen. I'd make sure it has power, and leave it for at ...


7

Bootloader The low level implementation of a system which can be used to flash software onto your phone's partitions. Often used to flash root privileges or Stock Roms. Recovery The recovery is another system used to manage/wipe/reformat your partitions. TWRP refers to a custom Recovery which allows you to install custom roms in a zip format. The ...


7

This can be marked a duplicate of questions like this, but it's a device-specific question. It cannot be answered in a generic way, should be “How to root XYZ Android device without unlocking bootloader?” Simple answer is: It should not be possible to root Android devices without unlocking bootloader, but is possible for some devices due to security ...


6

It is possible in a sense, however. Given the limitations mentioned in @t0mm13b 's answer, it makes sense that the mentioned boot loader (lk) is incapable of doing this. So, we boot a custom kernel from fastboot (for testing), which boots, enables OTG functionality and once a valid kernel is found on the OTG device which is connected, chainloads that into ...


6

Encrypt your filesystem. You'll need to enter a password or PIN on every boot to decrypt it, so as soon as the device is rebooted none of your personal data will be readable. TWRP even supports encrypted filesystems (it prompts you for your password when it starts as well, I think). If your device is at least 4.2.2 then you can even leave ADB on; they'd need ...


6

The bootloader is not generally on the /boot partition, it's on a separate one, although that's not really the crux of the issue. The problem occurs when the bootloader is cryptographically signed, which is intended to prevent you from replacing it with your own. The device will check the signature of the bootloader at startup and refuse to boot one with an ...


6

Assuming your device adheres to some Android standards, you'd want to run fastboot oem device-info. Often you can also run fastboot reboot-bootloader to get into the bootloader which often says right there on screen whether it's locked or not. Different devices can display the lock state differently. fastboot is located in %ANDROID_SDK_DIR%\platform-tools,...


6

No, it is not possible to remove the app from bootloader. ADB daemon is not running in the device in that tiny environment when the device is in fastboot mode and stock recovery doesn't offer shell access. Your best bet is to flash a custom recovery, such as TWRP, CWM or Philz Touch from fastboot/download mode or from a tool using PC (if at all possible ...


6

Just reboot the device; at this point there's no harm that can be done since the data was being wiped anyways.


5

The clue lies with the comment above But I just tried 'adb reboot bootloader', and it worked. which shows that adb is indeed recognizing the USB connection, but not in fast-boot mode which is where this answer comes in... Sounds like the udev rule for the fast-boot is absent! Do this: lsusb with the cable plugged in while the handset is in fast-boot mode. ...


5

What can I do to determine the cause? The user just accidentally accessed the Factory Mode on Lenovo tablet. It can be accessed by: Turn off the device Hold "Volume Down", then connect the USB (Image courtesy of XDA) As a proof, there is a text containing "GPS" like you mentioned. For the translation of each menu, you can refer to the post on XDA forum ...


5

Root access: Administrative access to the entire file system including the ability to change system files such as installing system-wide ad-blocker by modifying the host file on your device, or uninstalling system apps, such as bloatware that comes pre-installed on your device. Unlocked bootloader: Even though it is possible in some cases to obtain root ...


5

i'm no expert, but if you go to the bootloader, by (on my nexus 4) holding volume down then power up, then it says


5

Factory-resetting twice is pointless. The first factory reset will already wipe all user data: the second won't delete anything that wasn't already deleted by the first. Encrypting the device is also a waste of time, because you've already factory-reset the device. It might make some sense if you were the seller of the phone, and you wanted to overwrite the ...


5

It looks like you've got the wrong factory image. You're trying to flash the bootloader for flounder (which I believe is for the Nexus 9). You need to download a Nexus 5 factory image which should contain a bootloader called bootloader-hammerhead-hhz12d.img (or similar)


5

Ahh, since you have no knowledge regarding rooting and all I'll just explain in the simplest form. Imagine that you have bought a laptop from HP which Congress preloaded with a windows installation and some pre-stuff, I assume that a normal person would't be bothered by it and the extra useless stuff they install on your laptop. They prevent you from ...


5

Install the Google USB Driver while in phone is booted to bootloader. Those are in your SDK folder location - extras - google - usb_driver. When my N6 is booted to bootloader, Windows 10 shows me the following:


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