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31

Just had the same issue. Go to Settings > Security > Install from storage. Locate your certificate file and install it. Edit: If instead of Install from storage preference you have Install from SD card (this is what being displayed when you use API-19 emulator for example), then one extra step required. Because in this case the activity shows only Recent ...


19

In Android Lollipop 5.0 Settings → Security → Trusted credentials → User tab → Select your certificate → Scroll down, Click on Remove button → Done.


19

I had the same problem getting Android to really install the certificate, until I found this site which describes a method that worked for me. It boils down to the following steps: Create a private key and public x509 certificate with v3_req extensions and enabled as a CA: sudo openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:4096 -keyout /etc/ssl/private/...


10

Another caveat: when installing a certificate via Settings > Security > Install from storage on my Nexus 7, Android 5.0.2 I had to navigate to the file via Internal Storage: Trying to select the file via the shortcut to Downloads did not work.


9

I was looking into the same issue, and it was answered on XDA http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2537794 In short - it is possible if your phone is rooted to move the certificate to the System section. Very annoying that it is not possible to exclude certificates from this warning - it only produces noise when I know that the cert is OK to ...


9

I've described how to do exacly this on my page, "Installing CAcert certificates on Android as 'system' credentials without lockscreen - instructions" at http://wiki.pcprobleemloos.nl/android/cacert I've also posted it on the cyanogenmod forum: http://forum.cyanogenmod.com/topic/82875-installing-cacert-certificates-on-android-as-system-credentials-without-...


6

Assuming you want to use the email address user@uni.org, Domain would be uni.org and Identity would be user@uni.org. Source: XDA developers and originally Virginia Tech Helpdesk


5

I've discovered a solution that works without additional software or manual file copying: Set your lock screen to "pattern". Enter a pattern and an unlock PIN. Remember the unlock PIN. Install your user certificate. Turn the screen off and on. Enter the pattern wrongly a few times, until the "Forgot pattern?" option appears. Click "Forgot pattern?", scroll ...


5

Yes, it is normal to have these security certificates. To trust a security certificate you encounter on the Internet, your device needs a way to verify a certificate is good. You can't just accept any certificate that is presented because any adversary able to become a man-in-the-middle (like a public WiFi access point) would be able to spoof any website. ...


4

As the name implies, the VPN type IKEv2/IPSec RSA [sic, it should actually be "IPsec" not "IPSec"] is for client authentication with an RSA certificate/key. The name was probably chosen for consistency with the existing IKEv1-based VPN types (e.g. "L2TP/IPSec RSA" or "IPSec Xauth RSA"), it might also work with ECDSA certificates/keys not only RSA, but I did ...


4

This page pointed me to the right direction. Android 11 can only install user-provided root CA certificates to contain the X.509v3 CA:true flag, which I suspect wasn't necessary before for some reason, and kept on working after the upgrade until I tried to install a new one because, presumably, the flag is not necessary to validate a TLS trust chain. The ...


3

My bet is that the CT log expired. See https://www.chromium.org/developers/androidwebview/webview-ct-bug and https://groups.google.com/a/chromium.org/forum/m/#!topic/net-dev/d3bHcocG-NM


3

Just faced with exactly the same problem. I googled for an answer but this is page the only case I found. Solution is simple for rooted device: Open and file explorer with root-access (I prefer ES file explorer) Go to /data/misc/keystore/usesr_0 and find there the cert and key files. Transfer it securely to your desktop. If you have a non-rooted device ...


2

I've written an article on creating & installing CAcert certificates as Android System Certificates (Android >=4.2), thus allowing you to use your device without lockscreen: http://wiki.pcprobleemloos.nl/android/cacert Main part of my article: cat root.crt > 5ed36f99.0 openssl x509 -inform PEM -text -in root.crt -out /dev/null >> 5ed36f99.0 ...


2

lock screen and security. other security settings. view security certificates. users. Then remove it. S7 Edge 2016-07-14


2

Go to Settings > Security > Credential storage > Install from SD card. If it's not there you may need a newer Android version or a workaround which I don't know about.


2

From StackOverflow: How to install trusted CA certificate on Android device? I spent a lot of time trying to find an answer to this (I need Android to see StartSSL certificates). Conclusion: Android 2.1 and 2.2 allow you to import certificates, but only for use with WiFi and VPN. There is no user interface for updating the list of trusted root certificates, ...


2

Guess you're using Kitkat (or newer) on that device? I'm afraid in that case you've got to live with that (you will always receive this warning as soon as you've installed a custom certificate – see official changelog regarding this1) – or root your device and install certificates as "trusted certificates" only. How to install a certificate as "trusted ...


2

Solution: Correct your date, or Set the clock to update automatically Reason: This security warning pops-up when the verification of certificate needs to be done but the requesting system is set to wrong date(usually to the past). The security certificate is seen as From Future. This is all related to certificate validation by the browser. Related Stack ...


2

Three cents!. . At this time this change in behavior is specific to Android 11 code, December 2020 update, Build number RQ1A/D depending on model. Important to note that this google change for Enterprise WiFi connection relates to both 1) Possible manual import of the root CA certificate, AND 2) the mandatory use specification of the "Domain" being ...


2

At this time, Firefox for Android does not support importing a PKCS #12 certificate. This is bug 868370. If you have root access to your device, you can import it manually using a Linux computer attached to the phone with adb. If your client certificate came from a <keygen> form, you can use the same form in Firefox for Android to generate and ...


2

I solved this problem at my university (not Eduroam) by installing a CA certificate in Android (8). It then becomes a choice in the CA Certificate menu and you can sign in. Hopefully, you can find out from the IT people where is the CA Certificate to download to your Android. I think choosing "Don't validate" is unwise, and that's actually what many ...


2

I had some issues with this after the Android 11 update. Android 11 no longer allows you to add certificates from any app other than the settings app, so you will have to generate and set the certificate yourself. Generate the certificate in linux. You can also do this on the device if you get an openssl app or terminal. I followed this tutorial, except I ...


2

Latest Udate 2020-12-21 Let's Encrypt has delayed the new root CA certificate for 3 years: We’re happy to announce that we have developed a way for older Android devices to retain their ability to visit sites that use Let’s Encrypt certificates after our cross-signed intermediates expire. We are no longer planning any changes in January that may cause ...


2

The problem with the root-CA certificate is not the only one you are facing: Devices with Android version 4.4 and before have problems accessing a lot of https sites because they do not support TLS 1.2. More and more web sites require that TLS version now as the older versions (SSLv3 TLS1.0 TLS1.1) have known security problems and there is a recommendation ...


1

Certificates sign apps as they are submitted to the Play Store, and are controlled by the app developer. If you are getting a warning, it should be specific to the app it reports against. Contact the app developer to seek a rebuilt app with an updated certificate. The following is from Google's development documentation, and is for the app developer (who ...


1

Android Nougat doesn't allow to install user specific CA certificates. From Google blog: By default, apps that target API level 24 will—by design—not honor such CAs unless the app explicitly opts in. This safe-by-default setting reduces application attack surface and encourages consistent handling of network and file-based application data.


1

A certificate authority signs digital certificates. Often times companies will pay an internationally trusted CA such as VeriSign or DigiCert to sign certificates on their own domain. In some cases it may make more sense to act as your own CA, rather than paying a CA like DigiCert. Your university is doing exactly that, ie using their own certificate ...


1

For anyone who is curious, I believe I found the answer: Linux: There is no central root certificate program as part of Linux. When running on Linux, Google Chrome uses the Mozilla Network Security Services (NSS) library to perform certificate verification. When packaged or built from source, NSS includes certificates vetted according to the ...


1

Step 1: Make the certs compatible (if they are not already) At the very beginning we need to figure the file name of our the cert file. The name of the cert file is a hash one can obtain from the certificate itself. For this, one needs the openssl tools. On Unix/Linux the steps are then as follows: # Obtain the hash – in my case that returned d6a2705a – so ...


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