9

Android Wear - Developed by Google Inc., an official adaptation of the pre-existing Android ecosystem for wearable devices. Pros : Developed by the same company that owns and contributes to Android, therefore underlying compatibility and the promise of future updates. More apps, due to the Google Play app store. Deeper linkage with the Android ...


9

If you have adb set up, it's a one-liner at the shell prompt: $ adb shell "getprop ro.product.cpu.abi" arm64-v8a In this example, the device asked answered that it has a 64bit ARM V8a CPU (second line). Note: You can also run the quoted command in a terminal emulator running on the device / emulator. In there, it's just getprop ro.product.cpu.abi.


8

In general, NO. Some apps: run on specific devices only (i.e. not compatible with S4) run on specific Android versions available only in specific countries available only on specific carriers requires root access. (i.e. if phone is not rooted, it won't work)


7

Some years ago the protocol used by Google Play Store internally to query and download app was so nice to present you the exact reason why you can not download an app (e.g. the responses on network level contained the data what feature, library or what so ever your device misses). Unfortunately some years ago (I think it was about 2016) Google changed the ...


6

It could mean that your phone does not meet either software or hardware requirements, or both. You could probably spoof the identity of your phone (so that it could be recognized as Samsung Galaxy S4 for example, instead of HTC Salsa), but you can't expect the app to work properly in this case. So, I would suggest to get an updated / higher-end phone ...


6

Sometimes an app has the ability to run on an old device, but there is also something in an app's apk file, indicating the oldest version that can install this app. For example, maybe an app CAN be run on android 4.4 but the author of the app set the minimum supported version to android 5.0. So it is possible to change it. Afterwards the app might be able to ...


5

CPU -Z is a versatile app that gives you SoC information apart from some other apps From app description on play store


5

It sounds like the application is only compatible with ARM CPUs, but not with x86. Genymotion doesn't have an ARM translation libraries installed due to intellectual property reasons where Bluestacks have them installed by default. Here is the response which I've received from Genymotion support team explaining this in details: We do not offer 32-bits AMI ...


4

According to "Diana FromGameloft" on the Gameloft forums: You and your friends have to play the same version of the game on the same platform/device in order to see each other. Also "Gameloft_Ryan" posted on Windows Phone Central forums to say: You can only play cross-platform multiplayer with W8 and WP8 users. There isn't cross-platform for ...


4

Google Play lets app developers restrict which devices their apps can be installed on. Developers target specific device characteristics (screen size, keyboard configuration, software version, hardware specs, geographic location, carrier, etc) by specifying them in the app's manifest. Google Play then filters which users can install the app given their ...


4

Like Izzy said, the security of the app store is very important. In addition, make sure not to download the same app, or an app with the same package name on two different markets, it might create a conflict and produce a few errors, possibly a signature mismatch but it may vary by market. If the creators of the market are smart, they would prevent the error ...


4

Depends on the store you're using, and how safe it is. See e.g. our alternative-markets tag-wiki, questions using that tag, and especially How safe is it to use Aptoide? I've made pretty good experiences with F-Droid, and also with Aptoide (sticking to their main repository named "Apps", which is curated manually and well maintained – see the link in ...


3

It's mostly games that might be incompatible with x86. Typically, apps have no reason to use the NDK unless they has special performance or graphics requirements, and their libraries might only be built for ARM. I don't believe that apps using root are typically incompatible, it's rooting apps — since they often rely on platform-specific binaries/...


3

This appears to be because you can schedule backups within Titanium Backup, and when backing up the 'Sleep As Android' app Titanium Backup may/will kill the application in order to perform the backup. By doing this the app will no longer track you sleep or wake you up at the required time. I don't think that simply having Titanium Backup installed will break ...


3

Application developers can set their own requirements in the play store for what must be present before a game or application will be available. For example, it is possible to require a device has a camera, or has a screen larger than a given size, or has support for a particular version of OpenGL. The HTC Salsa is equipped with an ARMv6 CPU (MSM7227), ...


3

No there are not all compatible. When you watching an application on Google play ( from your device ) if you cannot find the button for installing that app, that means that your device is not supported by that application. Also if you visit that application page on Google play desktop site, and your device is listed in your account than a message will appear ...


3

Look up on APKPure. They list this data at the bottom of the screen. No need to download tools. As a consumer, I needed to know the version because I wanted to know if my older Kindle tablet could run some software or not.


3

You can compare that to other OS's versions as well: A program designed for e.g. Windows 8 does not necessarily run on Windows 95. Development goes on, and that includes the APIs they provide. With each new version, new interfaces are available to the programmers, saving them from "re-inventing the wheel": Why code an entire library yourself, when it's much ...


3

You can try Market Helper; requires ROOT. Market Helper is a tool for Android that helps users to be able to change/fake their rooted devices to any other devices. For example, it can turn your Nexus 7 into Samsung Galaxy S3 in a few seconds. No reboot is required.


3

You won't have any problems if you insert only one SIM into dual SIM phone, i have dual sim phone myself with only one SIM in it and it work without any problem. Phone will work even you don't have any SIM in it.


3

You can install it from apkmirror choose your android version and it's done. If after installation app misbehave try to install a lower version of the app. Remember: You may be asked to enable 'Unknown Sources' (to install apps that are downloaded outside of playstore). To enable: • Open Settings • Security Settings Under 'Security Settings' you will see ...


2

That's not a Play Store compatibility error that you're getting on your device, that's an install error which says that it's having problems installing the app on your device. The Play Store only checks some basic specs of your device (like OS versions, screen size, RAM size, whether or not there's a camera, etc) it can't tell remotely whether or not there's ...


2

Let him try installing it via Playstore. If it's "incompatible by design" (e.g. requires Android 4.x while he has only 2.3), Playstore would refuse to install it and give the hint "not compatible with your device". Apart from that (and if the app description doesn't give a clue): check the comments for hints (take care for their date, compared with the "...


2

It's weird that your ringtones are still incompatible after conversion to the Ogg Vorbis format, because it (as you probably already know) is what Android's native ringtones come in. Since you mentioned that you put your files in /system/media/audio/ringtones, it is worth a try to check and set the permissions of your files. It's as easy as chmod 0644 /...


2

See Filters on Google Playstore and on How filters work? Filtering in Google Play is based on several types of app metadata and configuration settings, including manifest declarations, required libraries,architecture dependencies, and distribution controls set in the Google Play Developer Console, such as geographic targeting, pricing, and more. ...


2

My guess would be that one of the plugs on the headphone cable is slightly off-spec and isn't making good electrical contact in the socket. Swapping it around means the dodgy connector is in the other socket, and maybe that connection is slightly more forgiving. (Of course, it could just as easily be one of the sockets that's slightly off-spec. The symptoms ...


2

I did buy it. So far, all apps * (root or not) and six out of eight Xposed modules I have tried have worked. This is a somewhat small sample, because I haven't tested any apps I don't use myself. These are just the apps I personally use: * = Update: Pokémon Go does not work on x86 at the moment. Some working root apps Adaway BusyBox installer by Meefik ...


2

there is no way to run to run apps with higher from your android version try old versions of the app and the last option is rooting and it have so so many risk of bricking your phone so using old versions is the best choice


1

Luckily, Cyanogenmod is in fact compatible with play services. I am not sure about the stock apps that samsung has, as I didn't even bother trying to install them. The adb backup I made before going to CM restored properly. Google Apps are copyrighted, that's why they are not there initially. You can flash the Open GApps package as I found that to work for ...


1

There might be some explicit restrictions (such as availability in certain countries only, and/or a subset of Android versions), and indirect ones. A developer hardly can test an app on all devices that exist, so they usually setup parameters: Android version, device features. An app might e.g. require a minimum screen resolution – which would rule out all ...


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