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22

I ended up with this conclusion after searching a lot. Useful info in Unity Stats. ARMv7: 98.1% Intel x86: 1.7% However I was not satisfied so I verified it from many resources. According to Android Documentation. armeabi was deprecated in r16. Removed in r17. No hard float. and Historically the NDK supported 32-bit and 64-bit MIPS, but support ...


15

Since ultimately you're deciding whether x86 is still worthy of spending effort to support, I'm listing several facts about x86 for Android devices here: Intel had decided to discontinue the Atom line for phones/tablets. The last generation of handheld Atom - x3, x5 and x7 series - were at best equipped on lower-end Chinese Android tablets. Some come with ...


3

From Google Play Console (supporting a minimum of Android 4.1 and landscape screen): x86: 287 devices arm64-v8a: 3136 devices armeabi-v7a: 11716 devices


2

The "Show CPU usage" feature shows an overlay on the screen, listing the processes using CPU, sorted by usage. Turn it on through "Settings" > "Developer options" > "Monitoring": "Show CPU usage". Turn it off when you don't need it, because it takes up a lot of screen space.


2

Enable Developer Options on your phone (usually done by tapping the Build Number in Settings → About phone 7 times) and look for an option named "Running Services" in it. It shows a list of all applications which are running, for how long, and the amount of RAM they are using. If you tap on the app it will also list those services of the app which are ...


2

From Android - Handset built in Developer Tools - “Show Cpu Usage” option meaning? Leszek's answer Numbers in the first row shows average CPU usage in time intervals 1 minute/5 minutes/15 minutes. Color bars shows how much time CPU spends in userspace(green), kernel(red), i/o(blue). Also see the accepted answer for a developer explanation


2

I think you are mistaking the "Kryo" brand from Qualcomm from being different than just a customized version of ARM big.LITTLE. As stated in the Qualcomm Snapdragon 660/630 announcement article from Anandtech: Snapdragon 660’s Kryo 260 CPU uses four semi-custom Cortex-A73 cores in the “performance” cluster and four semi-custom Cortex-A53 cores in the “...


1

A couple of things: Applications that show running processes are only able to show the user processes (meaning no kernel processes) Android gives more priority to the application in the foreground (the one you are currently seeing). When you open the the task manager, the other processes are being capped. The measuring you are trying to do influences the ...


1

Even though you think you're only running a single app at a time, that doesn't mean only a single thread is running. Getting the UI from that app onto the screen is actually done by a second process, called Surface Flinger. Even within that one app you're using, there are probably multiple threads: one drawing the UI and responding to your input, another ...


1

You can force your cpu to work at full speed by changing the governor to Performance. If you are not sure what a governor is, you need to have ROOT ACCESS then you can use an app named Kernel Adiutor(https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.grarak.kerneladiutor&hl=en) to change the cpu governor. Also, overclocking would require a custom kernel ...


1

The reason of battery drain is mostly app. Either because of poor developing skills of developer or because app is doing something it shouldn't. Well if you overcharged it for 2 hours after full charge you don't have to worry no battery is that bad to die like that I mostly left phone on charger over night and I don't have any problems, yet :). This picture ...


1

Yep, same here thought which brought me here but then noticed also if you fire few apps and then switch between these and back to CPU-z it will shortly show activity on all cores.


1

Is there any way of activating all cores? You can't. The hardware is not designed to have all 8 cores active. The reason for this is that this Octacore CPU is actually based on big.LITTLE technology, where there are two sets of four cores: a powerful big cores used for heavy processing (e.g. gaming) and energy efficient LITTLE cores used for low load ...


1

If you switch to other apps and then back to CPU-Z, you would briefly see all the cores working.


1

Actually the core usage depends on the usage of particular apps. Like, if you use high graphics game you'll usually find that the number of core in use are more whereas if you use simple applications like WhatsApp Messenger the number of core in use will be 3-4 maximum. Hope it helped you.


1

It all depends on how the apps that are running are written and if they can actually make use of multiple cores. Even if you are running a heavy application, if it cant make use of all the cores, the other cores might still be appearing as off. Most system apps these days can use all the cores that the hardware has to offer. Bottom Line: You do not at all ...


1

That is perfectly fine. Why would 8 cores be active if you are in cpu-z app. Four cores are let's say active all time, and other four are jumping in if needed, cpu-z don't need 8 cores trust me. Try runing some heavy process like video convertor or unziping huge file, and in time of converting/unziping open cpu-z and see.


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