22

Here is what I use that do not need an internet connection: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.androidintercom https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.remaller.android.wifitalkie_lite


14

As the author of NetGuard I have first hand experience in this field. A disadvantage of a firewall based on a local VPN is that not all traffic types can be handled, because the (Android) Linux kernel does not allow forwarding all traffic types over a socket based connection. An example is IPsec, which is being used for IP calling by some manufacturers. A ...


10

No. You don't need a data connection plan to use OnePlus One or any android phone for that matter. Calling and texting will work irrespective of internet connection. However, having a data connection will be useful if you want to use some apps on the go.


10

To my knowledge, it's the approach: Root based firewalls use IPFilter / iptables to control the flow. This automatically applies to all apps, whether there's a network connection available at all or not, whether the routing is working completely or not at all, or whether you're in a "closed environment" (Intranet) without access to the "outer world" (...


9

You are (not) in trouble. Or at least you cannot tell anymore by simply taking a look at the notification bar. With Android 4.4 (KitKat) came a few design changes; one of them was to turn those notification icons permanently gray, officially to be "less distracting". So how can you tell if there are issues with your connection to the Google servers? ...


8

The previously mentioned serval project now has an android app available - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.servalproject


8

I already posted this in another answer. As it where different details that time (more a general "what consumes most"), here some details from a reference Motorola Droid. Data taken from a German article named Energiesparplan (Heise is a very famous technology publisher in Germany; Google Translate Version here): ┌────────────┬──────────┬────────────┬───────...


8

Of course not. Your WiFi will go through your WiFi chip to AP and to some other ISP. There is no connection with 3G just like you can use WiFi even without SIM. But your carrier can(though highly unlikely) use some tracking program to track you and find what you are doing. Even if they do, the WiFi usage won't be counted as 3G. One advice I'd like to give ...


8

You can give a try to an app developed by a XDA Developers Forum user gyagapen that essentialy the app intelligently manages switching between both your WiFi and 3G data connections as you move about: CleverConnectivity CleverConnectivity is an application that helps you to manage your data and wifi connection in order to save battery. How does ...


7

Short answer: yes. It depends on the currently enabled Wi-Fi sleep mode. By default, Android disables Wi-Fi when your device goes into a sleep. In this case, 3G is the remaining mode of network communication, and it gets used by Gmail/Gtalk push notifications, etc. Obviously, this network communication takes its toll on your battery time. If you disable 3G ...


7

From Android 5 onwards, there's a setting in the Developer options called Aggressive WiFi to mobile handover. Enabling this setting makes your phone switch to mobile connection when the WiFi signal is too weak. You can also take a look at a tutorial with screenshots.


7

This has been happening throughout the world and is caused by a technical feature of 4G LTE. Most people don't even notice it because of the small amount of data that's used off their data plan. This is what happens: every time your phone receives or makes a voice call, it automatically switches from 4G to 3G mode due to the fact that LTE is a data-only ...


6

If you have Android ICS, you can set the "Restrict background data" setting for each app. Go to Settings > Data usage, select the Mobile tab, then scroll down and select the app that you want to restrict. You can set the option at the bottom of the page that appears. If an app is built properly, setting this option will disallow the widgets and ...


6

Not sure if this question is on-topic on Android Enthusiasts. But I work with XMPP and Android, so here is my answer: As Lie Ryan already stated, a handover from one mobile cell to another is almost always transparent to the TCP stack on Android devices. But there are situations where the IP of your Android device will change. This are typically GSM/UMTS &...


6

In short: GPS works without an active connection, it's completely passive. GPS has however an addon feature called A-GPS (assisted GPS) which speeds up the startup (time to first fix) considerably. It basically warms up the receiver with GPS status data such as time, coarse location and most of all GPS satellite orbit location data (ephemeris data download)....


6

Basic Concepts You are confusing two different concepts: "GPS" and "Navigation", that are used for two distinct scenarios on your device. GPS is used to pin-point your location in the globe. Navigation is used to plan and track your movements from point A to point B. While Navigation may depend on 3G or Wi-Fi to access the internet and retrieve maps and ...


6

I know of no way to restrict an app to the 3G network (as opposed to 2G/4G), but there are several solutions to restrict apps to either WiFi or mobile networks (or keep/allow them from/to both). Examples include DroidWall - Android Firewall1 (which you already mentioned, but which is discontinued), its successor AFWall+2, its fork Android Firewall3 (gone), ...


6

If your device is running at least Android 4.0, you can use Androids native data management: Data Usage configuration on Android 4.0+ (source: Droid-Life.com, click image to enlarge) Here you can setup an overall data volume (a requirement for the second step -- but one can set that rather high, like 4 GB): tick the Set mobile data limit checkbox, and play ...


6

While a data connection might prove helpful for a faster fix (see: AGPS), it's not strictly necessary to have one. There a a lot of "Offline GPS Apps" available. I personally e.g. used Locus Maps successfully for that in the past, but there are plenty of similar apps available. Tracks can be stored on the device, of course, and do not need to be sent to a ...


5

You can always perform a speed test and check for packet loss( Speedtest.net, pingtest) Alternatively, you can try calling the skype Voice Testing Service which should be in your contacts from before, and if it isnt there the username is echo123 i belive.


5

Sometimes the culprit is much easier to solve: If accessing secured websites (https:) via the browser fails as well, make sure your date/time settings are correct -- otherwise certificates will fail. Best explained using an example: Say, today the date is May 28th 2013 -- but your device's date/time is set to January 1st 2010. Now you visit a secure website,...


5

here is a project on sourceforge , please refer whether it help your need or not.. just link here, http://android-ptt.sourceforge.net/


5

The generic perception is that networking via Wi-Fi cause less drain on your device's battery than connecting with 3G. During the data transfer, if you use both connections to perform the same download, you will find that Wi-Fi is more efficient since it transfers stuff faster than 3G, thus leading to less consumption of your battery. Rare exceptions may ...


5

GPS and navigation are separate concepts. GPS itself does not require Internet connectivity. However, many navigation apps (e.g. Google Maps or Waze) require an active connection in order to access map data on-the-fly, compute directions, look up traffic details, search for points of interest, etc. There are other (usually paid) apps that don't require ...


5

When Wifi is activated, all data is pulled down via the Wifi. It is a mutually exclusive/flip-flop mechanism. That is to say, if Wifi is off, 3G is used. And yes, regardless of whether one or the other is activated, battery is being used likewise :) No discernible difference in terms of battery consumption.


5

You can do so by having your WiFi switched off when its signal gets weak. There are several apps available on the Playstore which can watch the WiFi signal, one of them being Tasker (which is what I use). Here you can define a minimum level and tell Tasker: If WiFi signal falls below this, switch WiFi off. Of course you can make it even more detailed, and ...


5

While the setprop method to change DNS does not work, the getprop method to read those values should be still valid today: shell@A0001:/ $ getprop | grep dns [dhcp.wlan0.dns1]: [192.168.1.1] [dhcp.wlan0.dns2]: [] [dhcp.wlan0.dns3]: [] [dhcp.wlan0.dns4]: [] [net.change]: [net.rmnet0.dns2] [net.dns1]: [208.67.222.123] [net.dns2]: [208.67.220.123] [net.rmnet0....


4

Settings -> Wireless & Network -> Wi-fi settings. Press the [Menu/Options] button, and select Advanced Now choose in the Wi-fi sleep policy : Never Keep in mind that your battery is going to drain faster (because the wifi will never be turned off unless you manually do it), and is easy to forget that you changed the sleep policy.


4

While this might not be the complete answer to your issue, it appears that the Galaxy Nexus is connected to an HSDPA:9 radio (10.1mb/s theoretical speed) while the Milestone is connected to an HSPA radio (14mb/s theoretical speed, not HSPA+ which can have a theoretical speed of between 21 and 42 depending on the network). While the theoretical capacities of ...


4

On Android, Wi-Fi is always used in preference to mobile data when connected to a Wi-Fi network. This was quite clear in Gingerbread and older versions of Android, which removed the mobile data icon from the status bar when Wi-Fi was in use. From Honeycomb onward, the mobile data icon may remain on screen when Wi-Fi is active. If your carrier/handset ...


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