27

over a simple password screen lock: nobody can take the internal memory of my phone out of the phone itself. So what is the advantage of 1. over a simple screen lock with password + SIM code lock? Understand that encryption is used to protect the data from unauthorized access (device misplaced or lost or alike situations). If you are sure that the device ...


26

nobody can take the internal memory of my phone out of the phone itself While taking out your phone's internal storage out is harder than the SD card, it's definitely not impossible. Rework stations used to extract chips from circuit boards may be expensive, but not outrageously so (around $1000), and can be rented in many electronic repair shops for tens ...


14

There are three ways to identify which encryption type is used: Identification by device behavior As a user you should be able to identify what encryption scheme is used by the behavior of your device when it boots (e.g. because you restarted it). If the classic Full Disk Encryption is active your device will boot for some time and then present a special ...


13

The answer for me involved a number of things, but I think one is really the key. Use the "recovery" Command, bro This uses CyanogenMod's/AOSP's recovery program to wipe the user data and disable encryption. (found in this answer on Stack Overflow) Boot into your recovery, and then from your computer run adb shell recovery --wipe_data --...


13

Marshmallow has two ways to treat the external SD card : Portable Storage : In this the entire memory of the ext.SD card is available for use, if it is not encrypted (natively) and you can mount it on your PC to read/ transfer contents Adoptable-storage: In this the ext. SD is treated as a part of the phone and when you encrypt the phone, the ext. SD card ...


11

Your encryption password is the same as the pattern/PIN/password you use to lock your screen. So simply go to Settings > Security > Screen lock and change it. Note that when you do this Android will ask you whether to also enter the pattern/PIN/password when you start the device in order to make your encrypted device's data unreadable without it. In Android ...


11

I can confirm with 100% certainty that the numbers are indeed 1-9 for the pattern unlock. My Nexus 4 met the same unfortunate end (except on concrete) and after some Googling, I found this post and was able to follow personne3000's answer in order to mount my pattern-encrypted userdata partition. I'm running Ubuntu 15.04 x64 and had to apt-get install ...


10

On Oreo 8.0.0 Settings → Security & Location → Encryption & Credentials & it shows phone encrypted Better method Using adb command adb shell getprop ro.crypto.state ( works on unrooted devices also) returns encrypted or unencrypted Output examples Oreo ( Unrooted, encrypted) Vostro1510 ~ $ adb shell getprop ro.crypto.state encrypted ...


10

On my Moto G 3rd Gen (osprey), neither calling recovery nor wiping LUKS header (at start and end of partition) worked - I still needed to enter the encryption password during Cyanogen Mod bootup, then was stuck with an "encryption error" message. I finally found that my TWRP 3.0.1 recovery has a "Format Data" option in the "Wipe" section. This does a ...


10

Google has no idea what the encryption key for your device is. The entire process takes place on your device and the key is never transmitted anywhere. The key itself is also not stored in plaintext on your device: Storing the encrypted key The encrypted key is stored in the crypto metadata. Hardware backing is implemented by using Trusted Execution ...


10

Interesting question, let's just try it out in a practical test. I connected to my device (running Android 5.1.1 Lollipop) through ADB over Wi-Fi using adb connect 10.0.0.10 and ran some tests. What you are seeing is the output of the packets that I captured using Wireshark. Starting a shell in ADB by sending adb shell: 2290 127.822126 192.168.0.41 ...


9

Even it does not fully answer the question, here's a guide to decrypt the external storage formatted as internal. You do need to be root on your phone, however. The gist is that we search for strings including the keyword expand and ending with .key within vold using: $ strings vold|grep -i expand --change-name=0:android_expand %s/expand_%s.key /mnt/expand/...


8

Yes, 3G traffic will go through your VPN if it's set up correctly. Whether or not your service provider supports that is another matter; some block VPN traffic (such as Verizon - see this thread).


8

Same place where you start the encryption: In (I am on 4.3) Settings -> Options -> Security, the first entry will report the status and offer decrypt (if encrypted) or encrypt (if not).


8

Apparently there is no tool on PC to decrypt Android's encryption at the moment, but the TWRP recovery can be used on the device to decrypt everything... Even with a broken touchscreen, as long as your device is supported by TWRP recovery: Download the TWRP image (2.8.7 worked for me) Boot into fastboot (power + vol. down on Nexus 4) Start the recovery, ...


7

Master reset with hardware keys Turn Off the Device Press and Hold the Volume Up, Home, and Power Button When the phone vibrates release the Power Button, but continue to hold the other two When you see the system recovery screen release the other two buttons Using the Volume down, select "Wipe data / Factory reset" Press Power Button to select it When the ...


7

Thanks to Samsung non standard implementation, OP couldn't factory-reset and encrypt before selling. They couldn't : Check if the device was encrypted Locate the option for encryption Steps advised : Install minimal adb on your laptop (Is there a minimal installation of ADB?) and check device encryption status (Is there a way for a user to tell if their ...


6

The FAQ of Titanium Backup about crypthography states that you just need the passphrase to recover any backup. That must mean that the private key file is stored along with all of your backups, because it could never work in any other ways. The big problem with that FAQ is that it should states this explicitly IMHO so to make things clearer for us users. I ...


6

I have the same problem when sending encrypted mails from my Apple Mail client with GPGMail2 plug-in. Apparently K9-Mail supports only PGP/Inline and not PGP/MIME which seems to be the standard formatting PGP-Emails today. If you like to test it on your own, configure GPGMail to use inline mode through your Terminal: defaults write org.gpgtools.gpgmail ...


6

There are low(er)-level commands that can be used in a shell to encrypt your user data partition. Disclaimer/Warning: the following instructions will wipe your data, ensure that you make a backup if needed. Following these steps, you should be able to wipe your data partition and have it encrypted afterwards (similar to a factory reset): Boot your phone ...


6

There's some interesting pointer found in Decrypting Android M adopted storage (emphasis mine): Android M allows for adoptable storage, which is implemented similarly to internal storage FDE -- using dm-crypt with a per-volume, static 128-bit AES key, stored in /data/misc/vold/. Once the key is extracted from the device, adopted storage can be mounted and ...


5

I have found a working solution on GitHub: https://github.com/phyber/TiBUdecrypter 1. Install/upgrade dependencies (on Ubuntu) apt-get install python2.7 pip install --upgrade docopt pip install --upgrade six pip install --upgrade PyCrypto 2. Get script from GitHub Download: https://github.com/phyber/TiBUdecrypter/archive/master.zip Extract the ZIP 3. ...


5

Factory-resetting twice is pointless. The first factory reset will already wipe all user data: the second won't delete anything that wasn't already deleted by the first. Encrypting the device is also a waste of time, because you've already factory-reset the device. It might make some sense if you were the seller of the phone, and you wanted to overwrite the ...


5

Apparently on the "Accounts" screen, one has to long press the account. Menu will pop up. Click on "Account settings". Another menu will pop up. Click on the "Cryptography" item at the bottom. The Cryptography menu will open. Click on "OpenPGP Provider". By default, "None" is selected. Click on the "OpenKeychain" and you're set! Hope this helps!


5

Provided that you're using TWRP or similar. reboot to TWRP (enter password), and make a backup of Data partition to external SD or OTG Drive reboot to TWRP (cancel password), and format Data partition to f2fs restore backup made in step one to newly created Data partition reboot system enjoy Android with all your data saved, and encryption removed


5

The only way to remove encryption on a previously encrypted Android device is to perform a full factory reset. This means wiping out everything, including contents of the /sdcard partition and losing all your media, so make sure to perform a back up first. Keep in mind that some Android 5.1 devices enforce full device encryption by default. On these ...


5

Head to Settings > Security > Screen Lock and tap your current screen lock. If “require PIN to start device” is an option, you’re running full-disk encryption. If you’d like to convert to file-based encryption, you can do so by enabling Developer Options, then heading into Developer Options and tapping the “Covert to file encryption” option. Keep in mind ...


5

After a while I figured out what the problem was, with a freshly flashed phone. Here I'll be answering my own question. Does the twrp decrypt command output something else when decryption succeeds? Yes, it outputs something like: Attempting to decrypt data partition via command line. Data successfully decrypted Updating partition details... ...done ...


4

As @Dakatine hints, the master key is pre-pended on the file, which is then concatenated by encrypted content. I didn't bother researching the TB_ARMOR_V1 file format, because someone already has made a python command line tool https://github.com/phyber/TiBUdecrypter


4

ce4's answer did not work for me on my Galaxy Nexus GSM (Maguro) using CWM 6.0.1.1. I kept getting errors from CWM telling me it couldn't mount /sdcard even after I mounted a tmpfs there and used adb to push the update.zip there. After reading a thread at XDA I found out that unlike CWM, TWRP is capable of mounting an encrypted sdcard partition. So I ...


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