5

As of version 1.2.5, tethering has been included in AFWall+, you should only need to enable (Tethering) - DHCP+DNS services


4

Might be worth a shot to try this: $IPTABLES -A "afwall-reject" -m mac --mac-source 00:00:00:00:00:00 -j DROP the switches in iptables are case-sensitive. Replace 00:00:00:00:00:00 that with the MAC address of the BSSID that is transmitting wifi beacon packets, and password protect it to prevent mitigation attempts in trying to override it.


4

I had the same problem with wifi tethering after I installed Droidwall. Though the wifi connection was successful but I got no internet access. I got it working simply by adding the DNS in my laptop. Hope, it works for you or anyone facing the same problem. Change/Add DNS 4.2.2.2 and 8.8.8.8 in your PC/Laptop. That's it.


4

It's possible, but far from easy to achieve. There are multiple approaches we can use to block (or at least try to block) incoming traffic. But blocking one way traffic doesn't make sense in most cases. An app sending TCP packets but not receiving back responses will consider itself disconnected from internet. However, you may try for your particular case ...


4

The link you have provided is not setting up SOCKS but a transparent proxy i.e. it takes TCP/UDP traffic and SOCKSify it before sending through shadowsocks tunnel. But you need to make your traffic SOCKS-aware before directing towards SOCKS proxy. Either configure individual apps (which have built-in support for SOCKS) or enforce proxy system-wide ...


3

You can use adguard for this purpose which has the capability of both a firewall and an adblocker. It sets up a local vpn for non rooted phones. It also has a proxy mode. ( inorder to use with other vpns).


3

You likely blocked the downloads by not whitelisting com.android.providers.downloads From Question 58 of app FAQ What do I need to do to get Google Play Store to work? You need to whitelist the following: com.google.android.gms (Google Play Services for authorization) + com.android.providers.downloads (For Downloads) + com.android.vending (this is the Play ...


3

Quoting the NetGuard FAQ on that topic: Can I use another VPN application while using NetGuard? If the VPN application is using the VPN service, then no, because NetGuard needs to use this service. Android allows only one application at a time to use this service. NetGuard is a firewall application, so there is no intention to add VPN support. ...


2

On my stock Android 4.2.1, I don't need to allow (Tethering) - DNS+DHCP service, let alone (root) - Applications running as root for DHCP/DNS over Wifi hostpot in AFwall+. My system can get the IP easily but would not connect to internet unless I change my system's DNS setting to some public DNS like 8.8.8.8. It is a fix that I once saw on a forum. That ...


2

I don't know how Android Firewall app worked, but it's simple to achieve with iptables; thanks to Linux kernel. Since Android uses default policy ACCEPT, drop any unwanted packets: ~# iptables -I INPUT ! -i lo -m conntrack ! --ctstate ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j DROP ~# iptables -I FORWARD -j DROP This will also block incoming connections from tethered devices ...


2

I had the same problem. To find which app you need to allow you can turn on firewall logs in AFWall+. The log gives a log when traffic is blocked and shows which app was blocked. Enable AFWall+ (if you had it disabled temporarily) Settings->Preferences->Log->Enable logs Menu->Firewall logs->Menu->Clear log Disable and then enable WiFi to trigger the log ...


2

I finally solved this problem in the case of very strange and share my experience here; maybe useful for someone with same or similar problem: After a few days struggling with this, Using AFWall+ enabled on my restored official stock android, I‌ tried to change Wifi settings (got to wifi->advanced->[disabled most of Samsung/Google features being there] plus ...


2

With respect to MediaTek's "Common Data Service" I worry about it. Reviewing what rights it has in... [Menu button -> Manage Applications -> Common Data Service] shows that it has all rights, basically. And I've just setup the ADB (Android Debug Bridge), connected my phone to my computer and ran the following command from a prompt: adb shell am start -a ...


2

I don't think it's possible to change this without recompiling the ROM. You can't change the UID of apps after they're installed because they won't be able to access their files any more, and because it will confuse the app permissions system. Maybe there's some other way around the problem with Xposed, but I don't know about that. It might be possible for ...


2

The solution that Dan Hulme has provided is right and I'd like to make it clearer: You have to re-compile the ROM but wait! Open the source for EngineerMode and look for something in AndroidManifest.xml like sharedUserId="android.uid.system" and change it to something else. That's the fundament of a shared user ID. You must modify the app so that it doesn't ...


2

Is the problem caused because GlassWire reports false positives? You are correct. This question appears to me related to understanding of OSI Model. NetGuard is based on VPN which makes use of TUN interface at OSI layer 3, while GlassWire collects data from NetworkStatsManagr which is something within Android's Java runtime e.g. the creation of sockets ...


2

Guess you didn't read this explanation by developer regarding system apps. You need to consciously blacklist them if you want, by default they are white listed. Google Partner Setup No one seems to know what this does and what data it transmits/receives Rec: Block Market Feedback agent If blocked, cannot use Google to submit feedback to app ...


2

If you mean by network connection the applications that has "android.permission.INTERNET" permission, then run this shell script: for package in $(pm list packages -3 | cut -f2 -d":"); do dumpsys package $package | grep "android.permission.INTERNET: granted=true" > /dev/null && echo $package done; If you want to ...


2

Use it in "Allow selected" mode.


2

The solution was to disable wireless (WLAN) in AFwall+ and activate LAN. This does not make sense for me, but it works... It still works if I activate wireless as well, but it is not necessary. Even if I disable wireless access within AFwall+ I still need to be connected to a WLAN within Android (what makes at least some sense).


1

I came across your question because I had the same problem, and I just figured it out (although it might be a different cause in your case). Details of my case (to see if it applies): I'm also on 7.1.2 (LineageOS 14.1), and I'm using a VPN with AFWall+ v2.9.8. AFWall+ is supposed to only allow connections through the VPN. It's actually been working fine for ...


1

The incompatibility of wi-fi and wi-fi tethering is due to the way most "no root firewalls" work. Sometimes this depends on the Android version in question because some Android versions have a bug preventing tethering and the VPN service working together. Some devices hibernate Wi-Fi, preventing tethering from working when the screen is off and this ...


1

You can use Xprivacy for that. In case you don't know, this is an XPosed module (available from the XPosed repo) dealing with privacy related permissions; details can be found in its XDA Thread). Instead of simply blocking access to the internet, Xprivacy fakes its inavailablity. To be on the safe side, you additionally can block internet access for that app ...


1

Your wording is not very clear, so I'll answer base on my understanding. Nearly every root management app (or custom ROMs with root) allows you to deny root access to certain apps and grant for others. Of all those, SuperSU is the most functionally complete, however changing the management app requires the underlying binaries and stuff to be changed to ...


1

fwmark stands for Firewall Mark, which can be better described as a "netfilter mark", according to a quote in this article (also my reference). Simplifying stuff a lot: fwmark is a "stamp" on TCP/IP packets put there by the kernel. mark refers to the command line entity (whatever that is, refer the linked article for details). These are used by Linux ...


1

As you can see, Allow Wi-Fi when screen is on and Allow mobile when screen is on are greyed out for some reason[.] I don't know whether it is normal or not. They are greyed out because you choose them to be so. Under Settings, you would be having the following highlighted entries enabled which acts as global default for every app. (Click image to enlarge) ...


1

It's simple to achieve with iptables; thanks to Linux kernel. Since Android uses default policy ACCEPT, drop any unwanted packets. For instance you want to allow port 22 and block all others: ~# iptables -N MYCHAIN ~# iptables -I INPUT -j MYCHAIN ~# iptables -A MYCHAIN -i lo -j RETURN ~# iptables -A MYCHAIN -p tcp ! --dport 22 -m conntrack ! --ctstate ...


1

If you don't mind with the solution not being an app, then you can use iptables. They are included in the AOSP kernel. You can access them by downloading a terminal app off of the app store. You might however need root for this. The usage of iptables on android should be same as the ones on desktop Linux, so you can look up some GNU manual for it.


1

You can check if UDP traffic is blocked with this app: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=be.ac.ulg.mobiletracebox It's free and it works on not rooted devices. Just select UDP category and run the test. To check if UDP traffic is blocked only on certain ports you can use "Advanced" to set Destination Port (along with other fields of the ...


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