10

A factory reset reformats the phone's user-data partition, but it's not a "secure" wipe; it doesn't overwrite everything with zeroes. If you want to be sure everything is erased, you can encrypt the phone first (which overwrites all the data with encrypted versions of itself), then do a factory reset (which sets up a new unencrypted filesystem). (Update: ...


7

Android supports fstrim but it only works if the phone is idle for a long time while charging It's not so. On newer versions, Android runs fstrim with a daily schedule, provided that the conditions meet. Or it should run on a reboot if not run for 3+ days. See this answer for details and how you can run fstrim manually. FRAGMENTATION ON FLASH MEMORY: I ...


6

Try doing what it suggests... run e2fsck -b 8193 /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/userdata. If that doesn't work, try running mke2fs /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/userdata. You can also boot into fastboot mode and run fastboot erase userdata. If none of these work, please elaborate on this "long story". How did you mess up your data ...


6

It seems like manufacturers are removing the "Format as Internal" feature on newer phones. Perhaps because it's in their interest to force us to upgrade our devices after running into memory frustrations. So after a long and frustrating process, this eventually method worked for me. I had to make two alterations: I used the MTK ADB driver instead of the ...


6

Apps like Disk Info also provide the format (enable "show file system" in settings).


5

No, you MUST NOT reformat it before copying! Formatting a storage device means to prepare it to hold files, and it will delete everything on it (see the tag wiki of the formatting tag for details). So yes, formatting woul imply losing all contents on the formatted device (in this case, from your SDCard). New cards usually come pre-formatted, so there's no ...


5

It will format the external micro SD card to FAT32.


4

Related question: How to detect filesystem type of un-mounted partition? Just to complete some missing pieces: Usually we use mount command to see mounted filesystems, it works without root e.g. from a terminal emulator app or adb shell: ~$ mount ... /dev/block/sda1 on /mnt/media_rw/C8BA-D0E2 type sdfat ... /dev/block/sda2 on /mnt/media_rw/C78E-434F type ...


4

The Nokia 6.1 has a reported issue with using SD card as internal storage, detailed on the XDA Forum. To summarise: The ability to use an sdcard as internal storage is avaiable with build 00WW_3_206_SP01 However, users have found files put on to the sdcard get corrupted at random 4096-byte boundaries. In terms of options open to you, Google Play does ...


3

Honestly speaking, It depends on the manufacturer. As far as I am aware, the company has to get some license from Microsoft to include NTFS support. Speaking from experience, most (high-end) Samsung and HTC phones do while custom roms typically do not. The only sure-shot method to confirm is by trying it out with an extra sd card...


3

TL;DR: Every Android uses FAT32. The Cluster size depends on the release. Existing partitions will be preserved. It will always use quick format. Long Answer: After some more research here is the process as it was coded in the Android source code: The Setting App displays a few confirmations then uses the Intent: Intent(ExternalStorageFormatter.FORMAT_ONLY)...


3

The reason is, at least with Samsung devices and cards larger than 32GB, Samsung or Android formats the card with the exFAT file system, but incorrectly identifies the partition type as "FAT32 (LBA)", or partition type "c" or "0c" in the card's partition table. If you format the card with exFAT using Windows or the Android partitioning app Aparted, it will ...


3

That very much depends on the type of backup you are talking about. As the photo was deleted, none of the usual backup approaches would cover it: a backup only takes what is there, not was was deleted. How to recover that photo (if possible) depends not at last on where it was stored: external SDCard: safely remove it from the device, and use a card reader ...


3

NO. Unless you perform a backup before, you lose all app data during a Factory Reset. Factory reset A factory reset or master reset is a full restore of an electronic device to its factory settings. Such electronic devices include handheld computers such as PDAs and mobile phones. It entails deleting all information stored in the device. This is essentially ...


3

Android has built-in formatting capabilities that are usually available via Settings -> Storage -> Format SD card (or something similar depending on the device you use).


3

Easy solution for anybody with a card-reader in their pc. (Relaid from: forum.xda-developers.com/) Place the card in your PC's card reader and determine the drive designation (i.e., G:\, H:\, etc.) Download the fat32format utility in GUI version from here: http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/guiformat.exe. Click on the picture to retrieve the file. Launch the ...


3

No. Internally formatted external sd card is not included in mmcblk0. dd dumps files, in your case the block device file mmcblk0 which includes all partitions, GUID partition table (GPT) and any free space in between partitions. External SD card is a separate flash memory chip, so exposed by a different block device available at path something like /dev/...


3

A few points on four partitions: Dedicated first partition exFAT or NTFS or FAT32 (whichever Android permits and gives optimum performance) to store apps, photos and media. For apps consider Application Class but that's expensive. Others will exert performance penalty more or less. On filesystem selection, the biggest downside with FAT32 is its 4GB ...


3

If it's just the APK files, you could use the getapk script provided in the tools/ directory of my little helper Adebar, calling it e.g. with getapk user to retrieve all user-installed apps. You won't be interested in system apps, but for completeness: $ getapk getapk Extracting APK files from a connected device. getapk lets you extract a single app's APK, ...


2

As well as being in the right format, there are two types of SDXC cards. For devices that say that cards above 32gb may not be supported, they only support the V2 Sd card, and devices that say they support above 32gb, the take both v2 and v3. V1 is now redundant.


2

The Solution: Thanks to the guys on This Thread I figured it out. I also used the same tool they described, Minitool Partition Wizard, though I'm sure you could use any partition tool. In windows on an SDXC card you can only format in ExFAT and NTFS. With a third party tool, you can make the card a FAT partition. Once you do this, the card is recognized in ...


2

I had the same problem...new 32gig sd card works just fine with Windows, but in my Samsung S2,S3, and EVO it says damaged, or unsupported, etc. I then read on another droid forum about this issue, and here is the easy fix: Put your sd card into a usb reader for mem cards etc. You will notice that your card reader has a drive number like G:, or H:, etc. Make ...


2

This limitation is not due to the FAT filesystem : Since 4.4, Android only lets a special user group write on the card. Your card could be in NTFS, or EXT or whatever more, you'll have the same problem. The only way to bypass this limitation is to root your device, and install some 3rd party apps/patchs, or manuallay edit some files.


2

"Erase SD card" formats it. Back up data before formatting, because all of the files are deleted. You can format from the PC aswell, by mounting as Mass Storage, and formatting it like an regular USB.


2

Firstly, some background Anti Virus. Android devices are not susceptible to viruses as Windows machines are. To understand more see this Is an antivirus really needed for Android?. So, installing anti virus is not helping any, unless it scans for malware also Malware. Malware in Android devices works by losing itself into /system ,i.e., behaving as if it is ...


2

Things you can do: Downgrade to your stock ROM and install a good antivirus and run a complete device scan because some of them are powerful enough to remove viruses from system files in priveledged user mode. Install Ubuntu Touch instead of android as shown in this guide. The guide is actually primarily for nexus devices but you can make it work for Galaxy ...


2

I've already found an similar issue: SD card supported by Android 4.2.2 Here you would find this answer: I have looked into this issue before, and as it stands at the moment, native android does not support exFAT or NTFS. Support for additional formatting types are included in some ROMs because they have been specifically coded to do so such as ...


2

Plug it into PC and format it to FAT32. That should done the trick. Or maybe you can format it trought phone take a look for that option in storage settings.


2

Physically breaking them is the only way to be relatively certain the data isn't compromised by someone else somehow.


2

CWM is long dead, let it stay that way. You are advised to use the latest TWRP recovery, which has an interactive graphic interface, has a more powerful and thorough wipe function, and has an inbuilt file explorer so that you could just look inside /system to see if the wipe indeed worked (don't forget to mount /system before looking in, though). After ...


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