36

Gmail's official app doesn't store password in your device. Your password is 100% safe if you use this app. This is how it works: The password is used by Google's authentication servers for the first time ONLY. After first successful authentication, an Auth Token is downloaded to device which is stored in accounts.db file as plain text. For all subsequent ...


12

Android passwords used with the built-in Email application are stored in plain text inside a SQLite Database. This is in contrast to the Gmail application, which uses Auth Tokens as described in Sachin Sekhar's answer. For Jelly Bean, the database location is: /data/system/users/0/accounts.db The above location varies with the Android version This ...


4

Did u set 2 step verification to your Gmail account? If yes then you need to set Application Specific Password to your account. Login to your Gmail from Desktop. Goto Settings page. Find Authorizing Application & sites page. Goto Application Specific Password section Set your app name and device and Password, then click Ok. Now you can login to ...


4

Your phone doesn't store the password, it has some kind of session key. I would have expected it to be invalidated when you changed the password, but apparently Google doesn't do that. You'd have to ask them why.


3

Not a perfect solution but you can change your password by opening you Google account/Gmail on your phone browser.


3

Hook up an external keyboard with a Micro USB OTG adapter. Monoprice has one here http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=108&cp_id=10833&cs_id=1083314&p_id=9724&seq=1&format=2


2

Use a application token: If familiar with Two Factor Auth. /Multi. Factor Auth. on Github or Bitbucket and use a ssh token essentially the exact same thing. May I recommend using google authenticator ---which by default creates 10 OTPs (one time passwords) that can be used if the FIDO is not pre registered.


2

As a workaround for not seeing the password, you could type your login name and password into an app that uses plain text, like a notebook or even an email. Then copy each, one at a time, and paste them into the name and password field for the login. It seems like I've seen an option to show passwords somewhere, but I enabled that, and I still don't see ...


2

If a device you no longer use is listed (or if you don't recognize the device), you can remove it from your account. To remove devices from your account: Use your phone's browser to go to myaccount.google.com. In the "Sign-in & security" section, touch Device activity & notification. In the "Recently used devices" section, touch Review devices....


1

In that case, you'd better keep your passwords on plain paper in a heavy metal safe only – and never ever use a desktop OS to maintain/enter them. All desktop OSes known to me have "root access": it's called "root" with Linux/Unix, "Administrator" with Windows, and so on. And like on all those: you should make sure what has access to "root powers" – and ...


1

On older Android devices, if you lock your phone using Google's find my device you'll be able to choose a new password, and you'll then be able to access your phone. Go to android.com/devicemanager enter your email address and password. Now, press on lock. You will now see an option to put in a password to lock your phone with. After filling it out and ...


1

The most likely source of your multiple two-factor confirmation messages is something making multiple attempts to log into Google or Google+. This might be malfunctioning apps on your device, or someone else (accidentally or intentionally) using your Google ID from another device. You should contact Google, who will be able to confirm the device that was ...


1

I had a similar problem with another Android tablet. 2 step verification was turned on, but after typing correct password and code, I got a similar screen to the original post. Google help was unhelpful but I managed to solve it by attempting to apply an app password. [Note that in this fix, for me, I did not in fact need to set an app password]. At one ...


1

Go to Security in Settings and check Make passwords visible so that you can see what you are typing actually.


1

Maybe you can take your laptop/desktop computer and see your history browser from Google Chrome and/or Firefox to remember what was the name of your email accounts. Otherwise, if you often use a friend's computer, you could request him/her if his/her laptop recorded your email accounts


1

My mom was having the same problem you have to log off from gmail and sign in again which means going to settings manage accounts and tap remove account then you log in again and you should be good


1

Just waiting may fix it if there is some sort of slow sync between Google services. A simple reboot might fix it. I would try deleting your cache and data for the play store app as well. If that doesn't work try deleting and re-adding your Google account under settings > Accounts > Google.


1

visit https://www.google.com/accounts/recovery/ to recover password. you can do this from any browser. to create your own android "app password" you need to go to google.com/accounts/security and set an "app password" however, if you need to recover anything ever again from your phone, you can enable the 2-step verification and verify your phone number so ...


1

To log into GMail after attaching any sort of 2 Factor Auth, one has to create an Application specific password for use with your Google Account. For that, you have to to the Authorization Page in your Google Account, enter a custom name and google will create a secure password that one can use with any device. This password is only visible once after ...


1

I don't think there is an easy way to know which email address you used, afaik. But if you have an idea on which email address it could be. You could try to retrieve your password using the options below. Once you have the right password, you can try this to unlock your phone. You can open Google on your pc and try to log in there. Try the password recovery ...


1

It's not possible at this time. Should it be? I think so but like a lot of features that I think Google should implement, they don't necessarily agree.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible