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8

What is a LogCat? A "LogCat" is for debugging applications / Android system. When applications / Android crash the output the "explanation" for the crash, the Exception Stacktrace, to a Log. This log can be saved and help developers to fix the crash. What is it supposed to do? It will help to solve your questions, if your asked for a LogCat it is always ...


8

LogCat messages are not stored in files, but rather in circular memory buffers. You may clear these buffers using the following command: adb logcat -c Source: Using LogCat


8

The historical record is stored in memory, and is not directly available in the service API (as far as I'm aware). The Settings activity accesses it through the NotificationService.getHistoricalNotifications() method, but this method is not exposed in the NotificationManager API (only getActiveNotifications() is). You might be able to do it through ...


7

Logcat won't be much help here, as it only lasts back a limited time (it uses a ring buffer with a fixed size, so older entries get overwritten with new ones). Instead, better focus on the package manager: adb shell "pm list packages -u -3" gives you a list of all apps you have installed (the -3 restricts it to apps that didn't come pre-installed – ...


7

Using apps: Current Activity and some similar apps will display the info in the form of floating texts above the screen content. Using adb (from your PC): dumpsys window windows | grep -E 'mCurrentFocus', or dumpsys activity top (for full info meant for developers)


6

On a Samsung *#9900#, this will take you to SysDump. Select 2nd option(Delete Dumpstate/Logcat).


6

I googled the file name and found this post on XDA: i'm still having the storage is running out error from 3.8. I found out it was caused by the signal lost issue because inside the log folder located in data folder, it will generate many dumpstate ril reset by........xxx..once my signal is lost. so, i'm wondering what's the best worldwide modem ...


6

Go to settings and turn on bluetooth. Click menu button and you will see the option Show received files. Alternatively every files sent via bluetooth will be stored in a folder named bluetooth in storage (if the files are not moved).


6

You can use > after any command followed by file name or file path where you want to save the file. It would look like this: adb devices -l > FILE_NAME


6

Back in 2012, /proc/last_kmsg (1) used to be a dump of kernel console messages, exported after reboots by Android's ram_console functionality (CONFIG_ANDROID_RAM_CONSOLE), which used persistent_ram (CONFIG_ANDROID_PERSISTENT_RAM) to handle a block of RAM that wasn't erased across reboots (2). persistent_ram was based on Linux upstream RAMOOPS code which ...


6

Here is some ADB commands that can help: Dump each app and it data usage for package in $(pm list packages | cut -f2 -d":"); do echo $package; pm dump $package | grep "Mobile network"; done; Monitor Application for package in $(dumpsys package | grep "Package \[" | cut -d "\[" -f2 | cut -d "\]" -f1); do ...


5

If nothing can be retrieved from logcat you are probably running into a kernel panic. You could check via adb the output of: dmesg Some devices also have a kernel feature where, on critical errors, the last received kernel message can be read from /proc/last_kmsg Maybe this will give you some hints whats going wrong. If not you could stream the full ...


5

REASON 1: Apart from traditional Discretionary Access Control (DAC), - that makes use of *NIX owner/group/mode of processes/files to allow/deny access - Android implements several other access control mechanisms of Linux kernel to make itself more secure, such as Seccomp Filter was implemented in Oreo. REASON 2: While DAC is allowed by-default, SELinux (a ...


5

Unfortunately Android does not main any persistent long-term log files. There are some log buffers available that can be read via adb logcat. However the logs logcat can display to you are written to a fixed size log buffer (usually between 64k and 256k). If the buffer is full the first entries are overwritten. Depending on the log traffic per minute this ...


4

For developers (or other interested parties) who need to parse this raw file, here are some resources: logcat (the program that can output binary logs), it calls android_logger_list_read() to gather log entries: https://android.googlesource.com/platform/system/core/+/master/logcat/logcat.cpp Information about Android Logging in general: http://elinux.org/...


4

A method without root, that works even with new Android versions: Prerequisites: Linux, Windows or Mac USB cable for your device Android Device Instructions: Install your device driver for using adb. Everything you need will you find here Download adb executable for your OS. It is part of the Android SDK, but you might be able to find the adb executable ...


4

The files (if they are considered as such) to which logs are written by the device are not in /system but in /dev/log. These "files" are reset at every boot, so unless the device you have has a boot-time script that automatically saves logs to a file in, say, /sdcard, there is sadly no way to retrieve the logs you want while in recovery.


4

Without root or a PC: you can't. As you noted, the behavior you're seeing is entirely intentional, and cannot be changed. If you could find a custom ROM that did not enforce these restrictions then you could feasibly install that, but if you do not want to root then I would assume this is also not an option (and I would imagine such a ROM may not exist). The ...


4

After some searching around, it turns out ConnectivityExt is a proprietary Qualcomm file (source - you can see that it is included in the proprietary-files.txt in LineageOS), related to the Qualcomm package com.qualcomm.qti.tetherstatsextension.tetherstatsreporting. I found some code for this here, line 107 onwards. As it seems to be about ...


3

If you as a user experience such crashes, and want to help the developer to get them fixed, you can use tools such as aLogcat (free) - logcat or Bug Reporter to catch a log of what happened: While aLogCat allows you to restrict the log closer to the crash event (by letting you define what to capture), Bug Reporter enables you to send other useful ...


3

If you're looking to change the default size for a log buffer, to persist between reboots, you can recompile the kernel with updated buffer sizes. The file containing log buffer definitions is: <kernel>/drivers/staging/android/logger.c The versions I'm looking at use a macro to define log buffers in that file: DEFINE_LOGGER_DEVICE(variable, name, ...


3

As already answered, what you find in this folder are logs for events or crashes of the Android system. You could open those with a text editor and try to figure things out. All can be safely deleted, but the directory will get populated again as time goes by. settings put global dropbox_max_files 9 If you are rooted (or via adb shell - thanks @Irfan Latif)...


3

For information about seeing log messages, look at the answers to How can I view and examine the Android log? Note that the behaviour is different between 4.1-jelly-bean and prior versions. Android users don't work like users on a normal GNU/Linux system, so unlocking the lock screen is not a "login" in the same way that logging into a terminal session, ...


3

This site describes how to get access to the serial console on the Nexus S, which is really the only way of debugging boot problems. It's not for the faint-hearted, though: you need a UART-to-USB module, with resistors connected across certain pins, all connected to your phone. If you screw it up you will blow up the phone. The same information's also ...


3

You can use filtering to include only the selected app's messages by the tag(s) used. Use the syntax adb logcat YourTag:I *:S to show logcat output only from YourTag and hide all others. You can have multiple tags also, just separate them with space and have the *:S entry as last. If you need to get all messages from multiple tags in the same app, you have ...


3

Just solved this issue. Open Favorites in your phone - your Favorites list should appear. Open menu (bottom left of Home button) - 4 options should appear. Add to favorites Remove from favorites Grid view Settings Select Remove from favorites - boxes should then appear next to names. Select the names you wish to remove. Select Done in top right.


3

This is mostly speculation, but mediaserver is probably what is used to play all and any sound on android. Some app was probably using mediaserver inappropriately, causing it to show as using excessive battery. logcat2 is probably the process used for logging output, and is where many debug and error messages are sent to. Outright deleting them probably ...


3

If you have USB debugging turned on, you can see the DHCP activity in the logcat. Unfortunately, without a working DHCP server, you're not going to see anything. And the logcat doesn't stick around long enough for you to see the previous day's successful negotiation. You can also see the currently-assigned IP address in Wi-Fi settings under the advanced ...


3

adb logcat on your phone launches an ADB server on your phone (which is also running on your PC) and connects to itself. Then you try to write everything to /logcat.txt (/ is the the root of your filesystem; you can't write there). Try routing your output to something like /sdcard/logcat.txt or run it directly on your PC, where it gets saved in the ...


3

Android does not store the output of logcat in flash memory. Instead logcat uses a ring buffer in RAM of usually 64KB up to 4MB (depends on what is configured). RAM is much faster than flash memory and also flash may fail earlier if constantly logmessages are written onto it. A ringbuffer means that if the buffer is full the oldest entry will be overwritten ...


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