The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

63

There are a few methods how you can mount your /system directory RW or RO. However, it will require root. Method 1: Connect your phone to the computer. (Make sure USB debugging is enabled on your phone) Open CMD/Terminal on your PC. Windows: CTRL + R, then type cmd. Ubuntu: CTRL + ALT + T. Mac: Navigate to /Applications/Utilities/ and double-click on ...


19

Don't think about Android as a heavily modified Linux distribution. Because it's not. The nearly only thing that Android shares with a Linux distribution is the kernel. And even this component is modified. Also other core components, like the libc, differ. Android has no /etc/fstab You don't need /etc/fstab to mount an partition. But there is IIRC no mount ...


19

and the answer is pretty simple, use cp instead of mv)


14

The syntax of mount command usually requires you specify the target: mount -o remount,rw /system /system This output could be useful for us to better understand your problem: cat /proc/mounts As a last resort, as you have root you can try saving raw image of system, mount it on your box and push the app there, then flash it back on your device. To save ...


10

I can confirm with 100% certainty that the numbers are indeed 1-9 for the pattern unlock. My Nexus 4 met the same unfortunate end (except on concrete) and after some Googling, I found this post and was able to follow personne3000's answer in order to mount my pattern-encrypted userdata partition. I'm running Ubuntu 15.04 x64 and had to apt-get install ...


9

You have to be rooted and you have to have the kernel module for cifs support. if you have froyo, you also will need slow-work.ko kernel module as well. Once you have those, you can use (shameless plug) Mount Manager, it can handle loading the modules for you automatically and lots of features available for auto mounting when connecting to wifi, and other ...


9

It seems that, according to here, It's been supported since KitKat (whether using apps or not) But (as always) it's down to The OEM's discretion if a device can Run it. Chances are, If a device supports SD cards bigger than 32Gb, It supports SDXC, which has a exFAT filesystem (First Graph here)


8

The only reason you need to root phones in the first place is that the manufacturer has tried to prevent software choice on the phone platform. The PC design is pretty unique in that it has had a choice of software platform for so long that it's an ingrained feature, although with Secure Boot on Windows 8 devices this is likely on the way out.


7

The fstab file is in /. It's called /fstab.$systemname.rc where $systemname is based on the handset's fingerprint property, either identified as category of chipset or handset itself.


7

Rename the system.ext4.win file to system.ext4.tarand extract it. If your TWRP backup is not in compression method, you will directly get to the /system folder or if your TWRP backup is in compression method, you will get a file named system.ext4 which you'll have to just rename it to system.ext4.tar and extract it to /system folder


6

As existing answers already show, there seems to be no "unique way" to achieve that. So I started combining ideas from allover, joining them into a script (or rather a "script library") to have them checked sequentially (until a good hit was made), and integrated that into my "Device Documentation Tool" named Adebar. Those interested can find it in the lib/...


6

That is how Android File Transfer works for Mac, since Apple doesn't support MTP mode by default. The only way for this is to mount your device in USB Mass Storage Mode (because by default, Mac supports FAT32 and vFAT file systems). This mode was available in Android till Jelly Bean. Since KitKat (4.4+), USB Mass Storage (UMS) mode is removed. To enable ...


6

Apparently there is no tool on PC to decrypt Android's encryption at the moment, but the TWRP recovery can be used on the device to decrypt everything... Even with a broken touchscreen, as long as your device is supported by TWRP recovery: Download the TWRP image (2.8.7 worked for me) Boot into fastboot (power + vol. down on Nexus 4) Start the recovery, ...


6

Solution is simple. To remount a mounted system you need to have root privileges. Do an su. You will enter root mode. Then run the below command. It will work, I did it many a times. So here are the steps: adb shell su mount -o rw,remount -t ext4 /system Edit: Found a better solution From host machine(Linux or windows PC), execute the following ...


5

You can't mount them because there has to be some software to communicate between the phone and your computer. With the Phone the full software stack needs to be involved as it needs to take into account what happens when you mount the device when it's running. Also there are often multiple partitions on the phones, a raw mount would show up all the raw ...


5

First, make sure adbd is running as root: adb root If you get an error that says something like "unable to run as root on production builds" it means that you must always issue su command in the adb shell to gain superuser privileges. You will need to enter the shell before any mount commands will work. You will need to push the file to the SD Card, then ...


5

I'm seeing conflicting information. One resource says it's hardcoded, so not something you can change user-side: Android-specific init programs are found in device/system/init. Add LOG messages to help you debug potential problems with the LOG macro defined in device/system/init/init.c. The init program directly mounts all filesystems and devices ...


5

You can remount your external storage to be executable by running mount -o remount, rw /mnt/sdcard this will remove the noexec, nosuid and nodev flags, but it will still be vfat fs. You can make links to this fs but not from within. The remount does not survive a reboot, because the vold.fstab file will be read and they will be remounted at reboot with ...


5

/system is almost always read-only by default. Just remount it as R/W: # mount -t ext3 -o rw,remount /dev/block/mmcblk0p25 /system There's also at least one app that will attempt to do this for you, but it may not work on all devices. Another option is to use adb root (if your ROM will allow it) to restart adbd as root, then simply issue adb remount. On ...


5

Connect your device and at the command prompt: Type adb devices & press enter (Your device should now be listed)... Type adb shell & press enter (Wait for the "#" to appear).... Type mount sdcard next to the "#" sign & press enter... You will need to know the mount point also if you intend to mount the external card. As an example: su ...


5

Summing up from the comments above... As eldarerathis wrote: "connected as a media device" suggests it's using MTP, which would require special software to be installed (there are MTP packages available for different Linux flavours). Try getting UMS working You might also want to check your "notification area" when the device is connected: I don't know ...


5

ls -l /dev/block/platform/dw_mmc/by-name/ to find the path to user data partition. Then mount -t ext4 /dev/block/mmcblk0p10 /data Check the correct file system type as well as mmcblkXpXX from first command. If successful, /data should be mounted correctly


5

Open a terminal in ubuntu(ctrl+alt+t) and type this commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:langdalepl/gvfs-mtp sudo apt-get update Then, launch Software Updater (previously known as Update Manager) and install the available updates. Afther you pdate everything restart pc. if you want to revert back before making any changes: sudo ppa-purge ppa:langdalepl/...


5

I discovered that it was not necessary to mount it. It was sufficient to extract it with tar -xf archive_name but this particular app doesn't install.


5

Can I mount directly from TWRP's mount screen? Yes. Under the category Mount you would see a range of partitions available to be mounted. Selecting an entry (check-mark) would automatically mount the corresponding partition and deselecting the entry would unmount that partition. You can mount/unmount multiple partitions. You can verify the said method by ...


5

To access second partition on SD card if it's not deleted, you may adopt multiple approaches listed below. For deleted partitons or deleted files, you may use tools like testdisk and extundelete which doesn't seem to be the case here. LINUX / WINDOWS As mentioned by @iBug, you can remove SD card from phone and insert in a PC with Linux OS like Ubuntu. You ...


4

You can verify by checking /proc/config.gz and search through it looking for the configure option - CONFIG_BLK_DEV_LOOP=y. To do that you need to do it this way: cp /proc/config.gz /sdcard/kernel_config.gz and adb pull /sdcard/kernel_config.gz Unzip the kernel_config.gz and open it up in a notepad or text editor and search it. If its either # ...


4

Ok, so I had a look at this thread and, as it suggests, I took the microSD out and put it back in again. Now it works as before. Smells like a bug to me?


4

You cannot issue adb remount unless your handset is rooted, which is why it failed in your case a la "remount failed: Operation not permitted". There is an answer to how to root the Galaxy S2.


4

This is the way to have /data on the SD Card directory: Copy all /data to the SD card directory: /mnt/sdcard/data Delete /data Create a symlink that points to the SD: ln -s /mnt/sdcard/data /data The main problem is that /data could be EXT2/3/4 partition, while the SD Card is FAT32. The best thing to achieve what you want is to create an extra partition on ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible