13

I have written some tools for exactly this purpose, due to similar frustrations: https://github.com/dlenski/tetherback These tools are written in Python and use adb to create either nandroid-style backups (raw partition images from dd if=/dev/block/mmcblk0pXX) or TWRP-style backups (mixture of raw partition images and tarballs for ext4 partitions). They ...


13

The two are actually quite different. Titanium backs up apps and settings only. Nandroid backs up everything including the OS. Titanium is useful when messing with apps and settings, since you have the option of restoring only what you want. Nandroid backups are largely for when you totally b0rk your phone and need to restore it to a more or less pristine ...


13

The answer can be found in the backup tag-wiki. In short: ADB Backup is the newer file based backup scheme introduced in Android 4.0. It creates a backup of the file system tree and files. Better explanation would be it's a logical backup, as files are mainly grouped by apps. Side-effect is that files not having a clear relation might be missing from such ...


11

The easiest way is to make the nandroid via a third party recovery (E.g. CWM, TWRP, PhilZ etc.) and copy that onto your PC of course. If this option isn't possible: From XDA Developers on Nandroid to PC This guide is intended to make a full backup of your android phone (the entire memory block with all partitions) or a single partition (including sdcards, ...


9

First, some disambiguation is in order. Amon_Ra is a developer who created one of the recovery consoles (named after himself.) Just like ClockworkMod (which was created by a different developer named Koushik Dutta, a.k.a. Koush) Amon_Ra's Recovery performs various low-level tasks on Android devices. Odin is a Windows application that can be used to flash ...


8

A thread on XDA developers describes How to make a nandroid backup directly to your computer without using sdcard. Of course it only works on rooted devices. Further requirements include either a Posix OS like Linux/MacOS (Windows users can emulate this with Cygwin), and ADB (so either the entire SDK, or at least a minimal install). Moreover, busybox must be ...


8

Clockworkmod stores its backups in /sdcard/clockworkmod/backup (replace /sdcard with the path for your external card if you're looking for backups to external memory). With versions prior to 6.0, you can move off (or delete) the entire directory to clear space. The entire backup is self-contained. If you're using a 6.0 or greater version of Clockworkmod, ...


7

The size of your NANDroid backups is directly related to the amount of apps you have installed on your phone, and amount of data these apps store on your phone's internal memory. Even though CWM excludes the /data/media folder (which is usually mounted as /sdcard on newer Android OS versions,) the contents of /system and /data partitions alone will take ...


7

According to: https://wiki.cyanogenmod.org/w/ClockWorkMod_Instructions#Making_a_backup ClockworkMod's backup/restore feature will generally only back up the /system, /data, /cache, /sd-ext, and /dalvik-cache areas. Other partitions such as /emmc, /sdcard, and /media won't be backed up. In fact, the backed up system will typically be saved to ...


6

That's got it all covered pretty good, but a couple of things should be pointed out One feature of ROM Manager--"Backup Current ROM"--is useful in that it integrates all of your apps (including paid ones), all of your data (such as contacts, text messages, saved photos, browser bookmarks), and your system state (your desktop arrangement, your preferences, ...


6

To add to other answer, your back up has ALL the information in your back up image as the phone has when you took back up /system refers to your ROM /data refers to your data created by apps both that came with phone and user installed apps (/data/data) /data/cache (the cache) refers to app data stored for quick access /data/dalvik-cache (the Dalvik cache) ...


5

In addition to the well-known Titanium Backup app (for which you must purchase the Pro key to unlock the CWM/TWRP nandroid backup support), there is another app now: Nandroid Manager, which according to its description can restore apps from nandroid backups even with the free version (there is a Pro key too, but it is required if you want to restore special ...


5

That is the way nandroid works. Its NOT some bug. Yes, it does include /data partition but your data is stored in /data/media/0 which it skips during backup as this would lead it to backup everything inside internal memory increasing backup size significantly. In other simple words, nandroid backup's /data option includes only apps and their data, not your ...


5

A nandroid backup is a full device backup – so you could ask the same question about a full backup of your PC: After restoring the backup, you'd be at exactly the state the device was in when you performed that backup – all changes done between making the backup and restoring it are lost. Reading between the lines of your question, you're rather asking how ...


4

If you are using a version newer than 6.0 I'd recommend you use the delete backup function in CWM. It's in backup and restore -> delete (and delete from external SD). Doing this will ensure that you don't delete a blob that is being used in another backup, as all backups now share the same blob directory. After deleting from either place use the ...


4

I tested this, and your concern is valid. I added a dummy file to /system and then did a nandroid restore. The dummy file survived. Repeated the same test on /data with same result. So I don't know why CWM doesn't wipe those partitions first. The CWM author probably made an assumption it doesn't matter or there may be a valid reason they don't get wiped....


4

Unlocking the bootloader performs a factory-reset on the phone, deleting all the user data. It doesn't wipe the ROM. If you're just trying to back up the stock ROM before flashing (a sensible precaution), then you can safely do that after unlocking the bootloader. If you want to back up your user data (i.e. installed apps and their data, contacts, etc.), ...


3

ClockworkMod needs to be updated to properly understand Android 4.2's new filesystem structure so it can see its previous backups. Technically, everything stored on the sdcard is actually stored under /data/media, however Android uses bind to essentially make a really fancy shortcut to various other places. This includes /storage/emulated/ and /sdcard. As ...


3

Titanium Backup is able to read from Nandroid backups, so you can use it to restore parts from them -- and then use Titanium Backup again to backup those restored parts. However, as there's no Titanium Backup for PC, this has to be done on an Android device. If your goal however is to separate some apps from a Nandroid backup, there are other ways to ...


3

You can make an automatic nandroid backup using ROM Manager (free / paid). open the app - go to settings and select Automatic Backup. You can select the time and frequency of the backups in the following screens.


3

The system images system.img are located in the android SDK install directory under system-images/android-<platform-version>/<platform-type>. Once you create the AVD, in the %USERPROFILE%/.android/avd/<AVD_NAME>.avd you will find the img files for /sdcard/ and /data/, but /system and such are loaded from the SDK path mentioned above. In ...


3

Generally speaking, no, ClockworkMod (and other custom recoveries) do not backup your bootloader. You can physically look at your backup directory to verify this, but I have never seen a custom recovery that included a bootloader in the backups. What you typically get is: Boot partition System partition Data partition (also /sdcard/.android_secure depending ...


3

If you had contact sync enabled and you added the account on this rom too your contacts should appear. If they don't, try Titanium Backup Pro. It's a terrific backup solution and it's pro version allows you to restore individual items from CWM backups. It costs more than your average app but it's super well worth it.


3

Titanium Backup Pro can do that. [✔] Restore individual apps+data from CWM backups! Similar question.


2

IIRC, one difference is that ODIN can change the filesystem to a different "format". for example, there are ROM for the Galaxy S devices that would change the filesystem from RFS to ext4. if you did a nandroid of the device, before you flashed the ROM, then decided to go back to the "Stock ROM", your filesystem would still be ext4. This could cause issues if ...


2

As I noted in a comment, one thing to be aware of is that (typically) the order of the partitions matters. Android basically only looks at the first partition in the table, so you need to make sure the FAT one is first on the disk and the ext2/3/4 one is second. Otherwise Android will see the ext partition and won't know what to do with it.


2

You can use unyaffs to decompress a backup image, and then access the data directly. Here's a guide on how to do so.


2

Technically, CWM 6 isn't doing incremental or full backups. What it is doing is storing "blobs" that are shared between backups if the data hasn't changed between the two. When you run a new backup, it reuses what it can. If you delete a backup set, you don't actually delete the data, and the next time you run a backup, CWM deletes any blobs no longer in use....


2

Recovery images are hard coded to use the first partition of an SD card are the main FAT partition. As such, you need to ensure that the first partition on the card is the FAT partition, or recovery will try to mount the ext partition as the fat partition. You can use any partition tool to modify the card. You also said that fastboot wouldn't work - this ...


2

Show Developer Options (Settings > Developer> tap build 7 times) Enable USB Debugging (Settings > Developer > USB Debugging) use recovery to avoid OS root limitations ./adb reboot recovery do the pull ./adb pull /dev/block/mmcblk0 mmcblk0.img


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