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37

Well, I've figured it out. Sort of. I habitually put my phone down on top of my wallet, which contains my NFC-chipped credit card. It turns out the phone actually makes that noise when it finds an NFC chip. If I push my credit card against the back of the phone the same thing happens. I'm still not sure what it really means, though.


23

The NFC feature does not sit in the battery, only the antenna does. NFC consists of: an integrated chip (soldered onto the logic board) an NFC Antenna that needs free view to the phone's back side (antenna signals from the sticker on the back of the battery only need to pass the back cover) If you look at the antenna you'll notice how big it is. It's ...


19

Even though Android Beam and S Beam serve similar purposes, they actually work very differently and are not compatible with one another. Android Beam uses NFC to pair your devices over Bluetooth, then transfers files over the Bluetooth connection. I believe it can also transfer very small pieces of data (contacts, links, etc) directly over NFC, as the Ice ...


16

No, you can't. To oversimplify - wireless payments (NFC, RFID chips on cards, etc) aren't a simple 'what's your card number' transaction (because that would be insecure beyond belief), they are more of a 'here, encrypt this block of data with your secret numbers and return it' type of thing. The block of data to be encrypted changes for each transaction, ...


12

Can my phone write NFC tags? Your phone can read and write NFC tags, but only if the tags are writable. Many are read-only, or are write-once. Is my phone an NFC chip itself? Yes, your has an NFC chip, in a sense. It is merely a much more advanced one, as it uses the phones processor to do logic and respond. All unpowered NFC tags have a tiny chip that ...


11

See the edits for recent updates to this although the answer is still a general 'no' In short, no, not easily anyway. You can get all of the information off it by using an app such as NFC TagInfo however currently stock Android phones don't support emulating NFC cards even though their hardware allows for it. If you were willing to install a custom ROM ...


10

Use Z-Device Test app. check the GPS signal, camera, compass, accelerometer, microphone, speakers, WiFi signals, Bluetooth, GSM / UMTS, FM Radio, Display, Battery, CPU, Memory, Vibration, USB, Audio / Video , operating system, light sensor, proximity sensor, temperature sensor, flash sensor, NFC near field comunication, Barometer, the detection of ...


10

According to the answer by Michael Roland on same problem on SO, Play Store opening up after scanning a tag is a clear indication that the tags contain an Android Application Record (AAR). A tag containing an AAR will only start the app referenced in the AAR or will open that app's Play Store page. In order to re-use the tags, you should first format ...


8

The Verizon GNex has NFC, it just doesn't have Google Wallet pre-installed. It's pretty trivial to sideload it, though, and it's worked just fine the 2 times I used it. Another thing to note here is that the NFC antenna is actually on the battery, not in the device itself. This means that if you get an extended battery you need to make sure it has an NFC ...


7

The NFC circuitry itself is in the phone, but the antenna is in the battery. This is due to the layout of the phone. Since the range of NFC is very small, the antenna is placed on the outer side of the battery to increase the range as much as possible. Yes, the downside of this is that replacement batteries need to be NFC-enabled, but it's a small price to ...


7

All that host-based card emulation (HCE) does is it enables app authors to support more hardware: that is, devices that don't have the necessary secure element hardware. Developers of apps that previously made contactless transactions using the secure element will now be able to make their apps work on devices that don't have that hardware. However, using ...


6

In this specific case your friend is correct, but it can probably vary somewhat. We'll take the Galaxy Nexus as an example since it's a reasonably accurate internal representation of the other Samsung devices. The iFixit teardown helpfully identifies all of the major components of the device and their function. In step 5 they remove the wrapping from the ...


6

The NFC hardware in the Nexus S and the Galaxy Nexus is technically capable of emulating an NFC tag such as a contactless credit card. This is exactly how Google Wallet works. However, cloning an existing card is not possible, due to how the authentication process between card and payment terminal works (based on secret cryptographic keys). So the simplest ...


6

That's not how NFC works. The N stands for "near", and it really means that: the tag has to be touching the back of the phone for it to be read. Sometimes even putting a case on the phone stops it reading NFC tags. If you want something like this, you could buy a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 or later. These phones have a special feature using the phone's stylus (S ...


6

Can you read RFID without NFC? No you cannot. Can you read QR-Code without a camera? You need the right hardware to read codes. For reading QR-code you need an image of the QR-Code therefore a camera. Without a camera you cannot read QR-Code. To read RFID you need hardware to read the code. The hardware needed is NFC, so without NFC you cannot read RFID.


5

As far as I know, you can't transfer files over Android beam, just URLs/locations etc. This is because Android Beam doesn't use Bluetooth or WiFi Direct in addition to the NFC transfer, which means that an average photo would take 30+ seconds to beam. In Android 4.1+ (Jelly Bean) you can transfer files with NFC+BT, and S Beam uses NFC+WiFi Direct.


5

I don't know whether Tasker can meanwhile handle that itself, but it's at least doable with the right plugin. There's e.g. Locale NFC Plugin which could fill this gap. Alternatives exist as well, like a modified version of AnyTag, which is used e.g. in this tutorial. For more examples, tutorials, and possibilities, I recommend a GoogleFu, ahem, search for "...


5

With the backing of dotVezz, summing up from the comments: Considering the specifications, this is quite unlikely: range of the NFC signal is limited to a max of 10 cm on "clear view" (see Wikipedia) material with a greater density will reduce this even more: air ~ 0.001 g/cm3 versus Lithium ~ 0.53 g/cm3 makes rawly a 500-times-density difference, so a ...


5

Looking at a teardown of the new Nexus 7, it looks to be near the center again (here you can see in the photo the NFC is under the inductive charging). iFixit did a pretty good teardown of it here which may give you more detail.


5

From Google Support: If you're using a Nexus 7 and touching its back to another device, make sure the other device is near the "u" in "nexus" to successfully beam content. "Beam" in this quote is referring to Android Beam, Android's name for NFC content transfer.


5

There are 3 NFC modes. Taken directly from official Android Developer - Near Field Communication, Android-powered devices with NFC simultaneously support three main modes of operation: Reader/writer mode, allowing the NFC device to read and/or write passive NFC tags and stickers. P2P mode, allowing the NFC device to exchange data with other NFC ...


4

The RAZR does have an NFC chip in it. Currently the device does not have the drivers so the OS can make use of the chip. Motorola has been quoted to say that the RAZR is getting NFC support when the device gets the ICS update. Basically, the device could support NFC now, but Motorola, for one reason or another, did not include the components that would be ...


4

While the other two answers are basically correct (you cannot create full clones of current contactless credit cards), there are attack scenarios that permit creating limited clones of EMV-based contactless credit cards. This paper, for instance, describes a method to clone MasterCard PayPass cards by abusing a vulnerability caused by the backwards-...


4

Trigger can, among other things, run Tasker tasks. In any case, it's probably worth while to check out this app if you plan on experimenting with NFC tags.


4

From trying it on two devices: Galaxy S4 Google Play Edition: Lollipop 5.0, with multiple browsers. Once tagged the prompt to choose my browser comes up, and then once chosen opens the URL in the selected browser. The device was factory reset that morning. HTC M7: Stock 4.4 up to date, no reset done, one browser. Opened straight in the browser.


4

Sorry to say this, but it seems to be a long way off before truly turning a NON NFC into NFC phone (as pointed out by Izzy in comments, there have been some efforts but no progress) NFC SD and SIM Cards claims that Both SIM and SD cards can be equipped with NFC chips can be used to enable. Toshiba has come up with NFC SD card last year, but the catch is ...


3

Essentially the individual apps don't need to have any understanding of NFC at all, they just respond to one of their standard intents that's been pushed to them by Android's central NFC Service. By default, that NFC Service handles reading the NFC tag and triggering the relevant intent to pass info on to another app on the device, like the Dialler. One ...


3

Background To understand the issue, you will need a little background on how this works: For almost everything, Android broadcasts "events" -- such as e.g. boot_completed, SMS received, SD card inserted/removed, battery low... NFC signal received. Apps can register so-called "Listeners" with the system, which are bound to specified events. In your case, ...


3

I've been looking at llama. You can set actions based on conditions, and one of the selectable conditions is NFC tag detected. I haven't tried this myself yet, but the program is pretty well thought out. Highly recommended!


3

The image transfer from S3 uses S Beam, which is a proprietary technology used by Samsung. It doesn't use NFC for the actual data transfer, but instead creates a WiFi Direct (ad-hoc) network between the devices and sends the image over WiFi. NFC is just used for "pairing" the devices. Since Nexus 4 is a vanilla Android, it doesn't have the necessary ...


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