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27

Odin is an internal Samsung tool used for flashing firmware to their devices (via Download mode, bypassing recovery etc.). Importantly, it also has the ability to repartition the device storage based on a .pit file, which can save you from softbricking (when flashing goes wrong and recovery/the bootloader fail). It is not open source and to my knowledge ...


24

Before you flash the recovery, untick the Auto Reboot option in ODIN. Then flash the recovery. After flashing in done, reboot your device directly to recovery mode from download mode by pressing Vol up + Power + Home button together. Now you will see the TWRP recovery is booted in your device. Now you can reboot normally and your TWRP will be installed.


21

Looking at this Odin 3, don't forget, there are variant versions of Odin in respect to different Samsung devices. But this particular one is what's used to flash, from my experience, Samsung Galaxy 5 and Samsung Galaxy tablet P1010T. In short, for Odin to operate, there can be .bin, or .tar or even .tar.md5 files associated with a ROM for flashing. Odin ...


14

CSC (Consumer Software Customization): It is specific to geographical region and carriers. It contains the software packages specific to that region, carrier branding and APN setting. PIT (Partition Information Table): You only need it if you screw up your partition table or if the firmware specifically requires it because of a change in the partition table ...


9

Per this page, WARNING: Do not boot into Samsung's ROM without first applying our Root .zip. Samsung's OTA updates install /system/etc/install-recovery.sh and /system/recovery-from-boot.p, which cause Samsung's ROM to replace the recovery image you had just flashed with the stock recovery. Our Root .zip removes these files, thus preserving your custom ...


9

According to this XDA-Developers forum post and this Droidguiding article: BL stands for bootloader AP represents the system partition (possibly stands for Android partition); under previous Odin versions, this was called "PDA" CP represents your modem CSC stands for Consumer Software Customization, this specifies the features your Android device gets ...


7

Odin is Samsung-only, you're right. (And as far as I know it isn't for all Samsung phones either, though I could be wrong on that.) Since Heimdall is, as far as I know, just an unofficial port of Odin I would assume it's the same, but I've never used it. Odin3 has a "Dump" function that I had never used. It seems to be disabled in v1.8x and v1.7, but not ...


6

There is no alternative for Kies. Kies is the only offical way to update Samsung's Android devices. To unofficially flash/update Samsung devices Odin (for Windows) and Heimdall (for Linux) are the de facto standard. These two a very reliable.


6

CWM is the shortform of ClockWorkMod. ROMManager, CWM recovery, Tether etc are their products. CWM Recovery and ROMManager are tools which enables you to backup your current ROM, install custom ROMs etc. If you are interested in knowing more about CWM, see this page. For rooting you do not need CWM. In fact for installing CWM you need to be rooted. ...


6

Unlike the Nexus S, the Galaxy Nexus has the Odin download mode. It does have a fastboot mode as well though. So this is normal and you have nothing to worry about. My guess is that Samsung just prefers working with Odin and didn't like having to work without it for the Nexus S. Or perhaps they had it in the latter but disabled it, and didn't bother ...


6

No, Official or custom firmware are only to be used with the device specified in its name Using a different phone model may result in your hard bricking your phone Is there a reason why you want to use a different phone model firmware over your own?


6

There is a cross-platform version of Odin called JOdin. It can run in a web browser, or locally after downloading the JAR file. Either one requires Oracle Java 8 to be installed first. Web version: https://builds.casual-dev.com/jodin3/ Offline version: https://builds.casual-dev.com/index.php?dir=JOdin3%2F ' The offline version is started with $ java -jar /...


5

.zip files are generally flashable from recovery, Odin's .tars are indeed a completely different format. If flashing a kernel you can convert them relatively easily (thought I won't get into it here) but it won't work for a whole ROM. You'll need to find an Odin package. XDA is your best bet, but see also: Where can I find stock or custom ROMs for my ...


5

Is there any reason to update Android firmware via PC using software like Odin, rather than just doing an OTA update? Yes. Since Android Lollipop, Google has moved to block based OTA updates which means if the system partition is tampered with (often done when rooting the device) the OTA upgrade would and should fail. How would you update the OS then? In ...


5

In the case you weren't eager to look at the research, here's the solution. In the same folder of your Odin executable, you'll find a file called Odin3.ini. Being it a configuration file, it defines the behaviour Odin should meet at startup. What we're interested into, though, is to examine its content, so fire up your text editor of choice and open the ...


4

No, Odin is just for flashing. The Dump command doesn't seem to work, at least not as of Odin3 v1.85; see Can I make a full backup of my phone with Odin and without root?


4

It depends. It depends on how the full flashable tar/kdz was obtained. If it was obtained from an OTA capture, what difference does it make? Just doing the OTA would then be the most direct from the manufacturer. Capturing is a popular deal, because big companies don't do free hand outs. The more experienced (ex. Sammobile) actually build their own tar ...


4

There's no fastboot for Samsung devices - Download mode is the semi-equivalent, except that it's only accessible via Odin/Heimdall. You will need appropriate drivers to get the PC to recognize a device in Download mode. Most Samsung phones come with their BL unlocked or unlockable (notable exceptions are AT&T/Verizon devices). To root these devices, ...


4

PIT stands for Partition Information Table. A PIT file is basically a set of instructions defining the phone partition layout. You should use a it if you want to re-partition the phone with Odin. You only need this file when repartitioning the device and you don't need to repartition it unless you mess up the partition table to begin with, or when ...


3

If all you need is root access, try flashing the Siyah kernel via ODIN. Ensure you get the S2 version, as the dev has one for the S3 as well. Also, you will need the TAR version as you will flash it via ODIN (at least for the first time). Later instances, you can get the ZIP format and flash it via CWM (ClockworkMod recovery, which is built into the kernel). ...


3

I don't think so. Usually repartitioning solves this kind of issue, so it's strange that the reverse was true. I've seen recommendations that you should do a factory reset before and after flashing a new ROM, so you might want to try that.


3

My first instinct is to say the partitions are messed up. I would try using the "shipped ROM" from here and re-partitioning via Odin. I found the .pit file here.


3

Most often the phone simply recognizes that the flash needs to be completed, and refuses to enter most modes until it is. So, first check and see if Odin will see the phone regardless of what's on the screen. Otherwise: Remove the battery, then re-insert and try to get into Download Mode again. If that fails, then remove the battery and, while holding ...


3

This happens because when you flash custom recovery from Odin and allow it to reboot on its own, Samsung's Recovery checking script checks if a custom recovery is present and overrides it with system recovery<3e>. To bypass that check you need to take your battery out as soon as the recovery is flashed by Odin (and before the phone reboots). As soon ...


3

You can try this while the phones is on. (You MUST have USB debugging enabled and authorized) adb shell recovery --wipe_data


3

According to this guide it writes the bootloader of a working device onto the SD card. This guide is a bit more detailed and describes it as follows: T Flash option in odin is for Samsung boot recovery via sd card. This option is checked when we are going to make Samsung boot able sd card to fix or unbrick Samsung dead boot devices. In this case we must ...


3

Solution by @beeshyams that worked in my case: On Odin in the options tab; Uncheck the Auto Reboot option. When Odin finishes the flashing procedure; use the suitable key combination to boot into TWRP Recovery Mode. From the TWRP menu; boot into system. Tip : In some cases, if a problem occurs try to flash an older version of TWRP From TWRP Note many ...


2

You need Odin in order to install CWM without root (or conversely, you need root to install CWM without Odin). CWM does not root the phone. You don't need root for ClockworkMod Recovery, though you do need root for the ROM Manager app. Edit: You can't install unsigned packages with the "3E" recovery, which was part of some official update packages (most ...


2

You'll want to Odin a stock (or nearly stock) ROM after a softbrick. This guide on XDA looks pretty good and includes a pre-rooted but largely stock ROM that should work for you. If step 4 fails, disconnect and reconnect your phone to the PC; if it still fails, reboot the phone and try again.


2

This is the download firmware mode. It can be used to upgrade official firmware via Samsung's own Odin software (or the 3rd party heimdall (also here)). It's also used to install a custom aftermarket firmware like CyanogenMod. Actually it allows more but installing firmware is the most common use.


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