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24

You can't. Most smart phones are designed as a System-on-Chip; which means that the CPU, RAM, GPU, device controllers, etc are all in a single chip. Updating RAM in such system means replacing a whole lot of other stuffs. Not to mention that you probably would have a hard time finding a chip with different specification which fits perfectly into the hole ...


22

I doubt that there is a direct correlation between battery consumption and RAM usage. The hardware doesn't know which RAM cells contain 'used' data and which not. So there can be no difference in battery consumption on that level. But I think that one could say that unnecessarily killing Apps causes a few extra CPU cycles when those Apps have to be re-...


16

Think of RAM like a paper notebook. You can write data into the book (with a pencil), and you can erase those data and replace them with new data, but the book's always the same weight. The book doesn't get any heavier, whatever you write in it. The same way, with current RAM technology, the battery use of the RAM is fixed, regardless of what (if anything) ...


14

In the source code of Android M that you can find here, is this statement: /** * @hide Range of uids allocated for a user. */ public static final int PER_USER_RANGE = 100000; In this line of code, it states that a user can have one hundred thousand UIDs. However there is a conflicting information. You know that root UID is 0 and system UIDs start from ...


14

Enable Developer Mode (see here), and go to System > Developer options > Memory


12

There are several factors, which I'll address (pun intended) in no particular order. RAM is expensive Sure, memory chips may be cheap, but that's not the only (or even the main) cost. Alongside the RAM itself you need extra buses, power lines, bigger memory controllers, heatsinks, &c. The RAM also takes physical space on-chip. For oomph-per-dollar, at ...


12

Android doesn't use virtual memory (in the sense you mean) by default, because it has a higher-level mechanism. Transparently writing pages of memory to flash storage is bad for battery life (and for the life of your flash storage, which can only handle a certain number of writes) and performance, especially since the application has no control over which ...


10

Key aspect here light user who Doesn't play games Doesn't watch movies Doesn't use many apps Uses only for day to day to use If the usage pattern continues to be same for next few years. answer is no, it doesn't make a difference While the other answer has pointed out valid instances of certain apps occupying more RAM as as time rolls, IMO it is not very ...


9

I know this is an old questions but it comes up first in Google so I thought I would put a simple answer. Depending on the version of Android: Settings > Applications > Running services or Settings > Apps > Running services or Settings > More > Application Manager > Running (at the top) or Settings > System > Developer Options > Running services At the ...


9

According to Google Google Play services provides you with easy access to Google services and is tightly integrated with the Android OS. And from the description in the Play Store Google Play services is used to update Google apps and apps from Google Play. This component provides core functionality like authentication to your Google services, ...


9

Whilst you can uninstall it, it will automatically be re-installed on your device as it is an extension of the Google Play ecosystem and Google automatically updates Google Play services on all supported devices via the Google Play Store to ensure API consistency across devices and versions, and to deliver fixes and new features in a timely fashion. Some ...


8

The accepted answer turned out incorrect or outdated. The "App Settings" module for the Xposed app allows you to specify on a per app basis to keep apps from being killed or freed: http://repo.xposed.info/module/de.robv.android.xposed.installer http://repo.xposed.info/module/de.robv.android.xposed.mods.appsettings Responsible care should of course be ...


8

Tl;dr It's possible with root, you can tweak oom_adj values to prevent apps from being killed, alternatively force the target app to stay in memory by "locking" it or change some related settings responsible for killing apps in low memory condition. Background: Android RAM Management Android uses a different way of handling processes. Instead of killing ...


7

Lost RAM is TotalRAM - FreeRAM - UsedRAM. That means, it is the difference between the RAM usage that Android is able to compute and the actual available RAM. Sometimes it can even be negative, due to issues where RAM being shared across processes is counted more than once. Drivers are mostly blamed for that. There is a memtrack HAL for them to report ...


7

Not now, but if you plan to use it for >1 year then you need to give it a bit more consideration. Historically, Android OS updates does not increase RAM usage by much, as far as my observation goes. As of now free RAM at boot time stands at 1~1.3GB for a 720p device with 2GB RAM, lightweight ROM and no Google Apps. The problem is with third-party apps. As ...


6

Since Android uses Linux as kernel /dev/kmem exists. It's a virtual character device file that is an image of the main memory of the computer. You can simply dump it with cat /dev/kmem > file but only as root.


6

These things helped a lot : Looking at which apps drained the most power. Performance improved a lot after uninstalling Facebook and a few other apps I had downloaded over time. Upgrading to CyanogenMod 10.1-M3 helped. They fixed a nasty memory leak, which probably accounted for parts of my issues. A little before the first 10.1-RC candidates, the CM team ...


6

Android, just like Linux variants, use as much memory as they think they need for optimal operation. Because of this, more stuff may be preloaded, so apps load faster or the interface is more fluent. So, if your memory is almost full, that doesn't neccesarily mean that you don't have any memory left. On the other hand, Android L uses a lot of animations, so ...


6

No piece of software can increase the amount of hardware (which is what RAM is), that your phone has. If you have 512MB of RAM, then you will always have that much. What this app does (as mentioned in the above comments) is create a swap file, similar to a Windows pagefile, which can act as RAM when your normal RAM gets near full. There are a couple issues ...


6

The list from the Drammer app mentioned in your first link, shows some devices are not vulnerable, E.g, HTC Desire 510.( Row hammer wiki suggests that ECC overcomes TRR mentioned below the table) Quoting from Source We encourage everybody to try our Drammer test app and help figuring out how widespread mobile Rowhammer is. We expect, for example, that ...


5

Simple answer: No. Android always uses OOM (Out-Of-Memory) prioritizing to free unused memory. You can change the priorities of apps (at least until reboot) with some task managers but even then if the memory runs low, apps in the background start getting killed. Think about this scenario: you've downloaded a badly coded app which runs on boot, causes a ...


5

The actual hardware: No. It is System on Chip (SOC) and cannot be upgraded. However: You can use Swap for this purpose. However, the performace will take a large hit, even on a class 10 SD card. Swap is, in short, virtual RAM. With swap, a small portion of the hard drive is set aside and used like RAM. The computer will attempt to keep as much ...


5

AFAIK, you can't. But, you can customise when to kill background apps (not selective app) by tweaking MinFree values set by Android (root is required for tweaking). If you have problems dealing with it, there are many apps in Play Store for that. My fav is AutoKiller Memory Optimizer. And, when foreground app and/or kernel runs out of memory, killing ...


5

While it's quite unusual to really have 0 byte free, there is no such thing as "unused RAM" on Linux/Unix based systems. RAM that's not used by apps themselves is used to e.g. buffer data from slower media, and caching stuff from the file system. You will see that quite nicely when running the free command on a command line (using a terminal emulator app, or ...


5

In Linux/Android it is not recommended to close apps or use task killers. Unlike a Windows computer/phone, Linux/Android can keep applications "running" in the background which doesn't use any CPU or networking (unless it's a media player). It has actually been proven that closing apps causes more battery drain, because instead of Android being ...


5

If you've read around, then you'll already have read that the idea of "free RAM" is a bit of a nonsense for Android. PC operating systems take an app out of RAM as soon as you quit it, which leaves empty space that the PC probably has to spend power on filling again afterwards - probably with the same app next time you run it. Android tries to avoid this ...


5

In this respect, there is no difference between regular PC and Android. The terminologies, however, is slightly confusing. System memory refers to the storage space that is used by system files, and Device memory refers to all storage space. Device memory does not refer to RAM. Your device's RAM can be seen in Settings -> More -> Application Manager. ...


5

I'd say that is absolutely normal. Because: What benefit would you have if your RAM is empty? You have RAM to be used for caching and hibernating apps. Unused RAM is useless. :-) Do you experience performance issues? Any lag? No? Then the S7's memory management works as it should. :-)


4

No it isn't. At least if you have to ask about it. Replacing any chip would require several thousand dollars worth of equipment and experience. Not to mention obtaining the correct replacement.


4

You can do it according to this post on XDA: Make a file called 99applock.txt Insert code below and put you messaging service in where it says PPID (that usually can be found in data/data if your using aftermakrket sms app) remove the .txt extension and put file in ect/init.d and just give it 777 permissions, it works for me. #!/system/...


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