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19

I'm not sure about the configuration setting, but I believe this is not only limited to home screen managers since you can achieve this by using 3rd-party apps. Some related keywords: Startup manager: Google Play Store Autostart: Google Play Store Autorun: Google Play Store Otherwise, you can use automation apps like Tasker: Create a Profile: Event - ...


17

(Self answering here because I only found this answer after hours of dredging through 200 page threads of forum posts.) There are two non-standard but semi-prevalent methods that may work depending on your make and model (and why recovery isn't working in the first place). Some phones actually respond to fastboot reboot recovery. This is quite natural ...


14

There's a couple of ways to do this: cat /proc/last_kmsg > /sdcard/last_kernel_message_log.txt dmesg > /sdcard/kernel_boot_log.txt plug in the usb cable with the smart-phone switched off. Then issue the command adb logcat from your Windows cmd or Linux terminal, it will hang waiting for the device to come on-line, now power up the smart-phone. The ...


14

What is the device doing exactly when I'm pushing the (hardware) power button? I guess that's the most friendly way. You get to see a dialog with an option to power off the device (stock Android doesn't offer reboot). It appears that ShutdownActivity is called upon when you long press Power button. Anyhow, this is what you can try, remotely or locally, but ...


13

Simple, really: Android is safely shutting down vital parts of the runtime. The OS is also broadcasting intents to tell apps and services to gracefully close. These, in turn, flush their caches of all data and shared preferences, save what-nots to the sqlite database, et cetera. In other words, apps and services are given a chance to do their cleanup ...


11

killall zygote This will kill the root zygote process and cause a Android system refresh. This does not restart your phone's hardware, only the Android processes. By default (in Linux), the kill/killall commands do give the processes a graceful way to shut down, though it depends on the zygote implementation whether this in turn gracefully shuts down your ...


7

Force stop is a one-off action, not a thing you enable or disable. Force-stopping an app doesn't prevent it restarting any time it would normally start: when you launch it from the apps menu, or through a share action, or automatically via an alarm, broadcast, or on start-up. The question you link to talks about whether the button is clickable (enabled) or ...


7

Based on the platform/system/core repository you linked above, I think the key is in libcutils/android_reboot.c. And important definitions are in include/cutils/android_reboot.h; namely: /* Commands */ #define ANDROID_RB_RESTART 0xDEAD0001 #define ANDROID_RB_POWEROFF 0xDEAD0002 #define ANDROID_RB_RESTART2 0xDEAD0003 Usually in normal ...


6

If you can connect using adb (usb debugging), you can simply use the command "reboot". If you're rooted and have a terminal emulator installed, "su reboot" will do the same thing. The reboot command will also accept arguments of "recovery" or "bootloader", which will reboot you into the recovery or bootloader respectively.


6

Real Reboot Works on Android 2.1 - 4.2.1 No Root 4.2.2 and up needs root. For a PC method you will be using Android Debug Bridge, commonly called ADB. Here is a link for a download. It's from the XDA Forums. Read the page while your there and get some good insight on ADB. After installed to the computer, open a command prompt (L shift + R mouse click) in ...


5

It does look like a stuck power button. (as ridiculous as it may sound) The behaviour in your phone is exactly as it is when I press and hold on my power button for an extended period. By right, the device should not turn on by itself when the battery is inserted. It should remain turned off - only a hardware switch can turn it on. As your phone turns on ...


5

I ended up looking at Cyanongenmod's source code and figured out how they did it. Here is my working .sh script: echo 'boot-recovery ' > /cache/recovery/command echo '--update_package=/sdcard/update.zip' >> /cache/recovery/command reboot recovery Update: with android JellyBean [4.1] and later versions, the sdcard data is located now at /sdcard/0,...


5

As pointed out by my other answer, and confirmed by the OP for the given device with reference to a blog article on the Z1, most devices with non-removable batteries have other means to "disconnect from power", usually "reset buttons" or "reset holes" to be poked with a pen or similar object. This should remedy in situations where the device freezes in a way ...


4

Widgets/Apps which might help (also with other phones) Take a look at Fast Reboot. The app claims to work on non-rooted devices (Does NOT require root!). Trouble is, this doesn't perform a full reboot, but just "kills all processes" to simulate a fast boot (I guess this includes the "system server", so it comes very close to a reboot). ...


4

Pressing and holding the phone's power button for a few seconds might do the trick. It switches off my Android phones.


3

Replace "service" by "persist" to keep it upon reboot : setprop persist.adb.tcp.port 5555


3

The reason it does not work properly is this: The init.rc script resides in within the RAMDisk attached to the boot image. Hence the init.rc script that was edited and pushed across is now overwritten by the boot image's own script upon reboot - effectively changes are lost! You need to extract the boot image, using every boot image has the kernel and the ...


3

You can try aLogrec, and if you like it, the donate version. Written by the same programmer that wrote aLogcat, it continuously records the log (logcat) to your SD card. I haven't tested it for how it reacts with restart from a crash, but I tested with a manual restart and the recorded log survived the restart and could see the shutdown sequence being logged....


3

You can't change this. Simple solution: Don't shut down your phone any more (except when it runs out of battery). If you switch off your screen only, your phone will go to sleep and won't consume much power. If it still eats too much battery, consider disabling wifi, background data, sync or even switching to airplane mode. As noted in the comments the logo ...


3

You could start by not overclocking the device. That's a common cause of system instability even in ROMs that are usually stable. If it's still unstable because of that, it could just be instability caused by (bugs in) the ROM you're using. Try flashing back to the the stock HTC ROM. If it's still unstable after flashing back to the stock ROM, it could be ...


3

I can suggest to follow these steps: Remove USB cable and battery. Re-insert battery. Hold Volume Down and Home, then press Power. If you can enter the recovery system, try to clear caches. If that doesn't work, do a factory reset. If that still doesn't, go back to download mode, and try to restore using Odin and a corresponding firmware.


3

If the device freezes, usually you can long press the power button. Depending on the configuration of the device, it will either turn the device off completely (e.g. Nexus 7, HTC Butterfly S) or make the device do a restart.


3

I've never seen this option built-in, but there are several apps/widgets on the Playstore offering a "quick boot" as well. The term is a little misleading, as it's usually not a boot at all. For some background information, let me first refer to my answer on Can somebody explain the boot process of an Android device?. Quick-reboot usually kills everything ...


3

No, without custom rom or root on your phone, you can't have this kind of menu. It will maybe appear in Android L ...


3

Press and hold the power button for 10-20 secs and your phone will force reboot, in most cases anyway. If your phone still doesn't reboot, then you'll have to remove the battery and if its not removable you'll have to wait for the battery to run empty.


3

After more experimentation, I've made a breakthrough. Ultimately, this all happens cause Android's Media Scanner will scan the internal SD for media at startup. When it finds Playlist files it attempts to import them into the system database but because the SD card takes a while to mount at startup and is temporarily unreadable for a while at boottime, when ...


3

This is something in Android that is called the dalvik-cache. It's basically an optimized version of the android package you usually install/download on your phone. This is usually done while installation and doesn't need to happen at every boot. However, in your case, reboots apparently trigger a dalvik-cache dump(for lack of a better word). So, Android ...


2

I only encountered device shown via ADB as offline in two cases: Device not authorized (ADB security features) No proper udev rules setup As the first case is most likely not your problem as these security features were not implemented in android when you asked this question. Your problem is most likely that you dont have proper udev rules. You can fix ...


2

Is your widget application installed to the SD card? If yes, then that is the problem. When the phone reboots, it takes a few minutes for the SD card to get loaded. This causes an issue for any widgets that are not installed to the internal memory as they aren't available when the phone first boots up, causing them to not load. So, please verify the widget ...


2

Plug it into your computer and see if by some offshoot chance you have adb available. If so, run a adb -d reboot-bootloader to reboot into download mode. If that's unavailable, you are SOL and will have to have Samsung repair it. Honestly, if it's hard bricked, you're better off buying a new phone...


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