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Use this tool on linux, I was able to extract the image of my emulator using ext4 on vm running ubuntu. https://github.com/qmfrederik/extfstools Still figuring out a way to pack it back. Will update here once I am able to do it


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android.permission.ACCESS_SUPERUSER was defined by SuperSU but: Due to changes in Android 5.0 Lollipop, this permission has been deprecated and is completely ignored from SuperSU v2.30 onwards Also only app which declares a permission in its AndroidManifest.xml file can be granted that permission. Shell (com.android.shell) is an AOSP's dummy app to ...


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For future visitors' reference, it depends on the SELinux context of the root process. In DAC UID 0 is the super user which can access any resource on the device allowed by kernel. MAC (SELinux in our case) is denied by-default i.e. no process can access anything unless a policy rule is defined to allow the access. So there is no super context in SELinux ...


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Though the question is old, it keeps on appearing on top of Unanswered (my tags) questions. So I think I should answer this :) AOSP'S SUPPORT FOR CAPABILITIES: Question is specifically about Google devices, I have never used a Google device. However what I can say for sure is that Linux (process) capabilities must have been enabled on most of the devices (...


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in Shell Terminal Emulator app I'm hit with the following: "...whatever.../system not user mountable in fstab" toybox mount returns that error when UID isn't 0 i.e. you aren't root. tried to modify a file in the root browser. The file: /sys/devices/virtual/android_usb/android0/power/control /system and /sys are two different filesystems. Mounting ...


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Processes receive signals from other processes or kernel as a warning or as a request to make some change in state. Receiving processes can block, ignore or catch signals, except SIGKILL which does what the name says. A process receives SIGHUP (hangup signal) when its controlling terminal (virtual or pseudo) disconnects or its controlling process (which is ...


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I never used Kingoroot, so can't be sure if it provides and option for master mount (su mm) or not. You can switch to Magisk or SuperSU once the device is rooted. If you can't or don't want to, you can use: su -c 'nsenter -t 1 -m /system/bin/sh' from commandline instead of simple su. This will make you switch to root mount namespace. For details see this ...


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/system/xbin/su is a normal su binary that's shipped with userdebug or eng builds of ROMs. It gets you root access by making syscall setuid. On the other hand, with SuperSU or Magisk root, a special binary is placed at /sbin/su which works quite differently. For details see How Magisk works?. So, with only a working /system/xbin/su executable, your device ...


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