19

You can visit whatismyandroidversion.com from your phone's web browser which will show you your screen resolution, android version and device id.


13

It turns out you can use Firefox for Android to do this: In the address bar go to about:config and then search for pixels. Select layout.css.devPixelsPerPx and change the value from -1.0 (default) to 1 if you want sites to think the resolution of your browser is the true native resolution of the screen rather than a DPI-adjusted value. If you have a ...


9

In Android versions equipped with wm tool, you can use the commands: adb shell wm size # shows the real size and current size adb shell wm density # shows the real density and current density (Click image to enlarge) I've tested successfully on stock Android 5.x and 6.x. Since wm tool comes with Android 4.3.x and 4.4.x as well, the solution may ...


8

No, it wouldn't make a lot of difference to the battery life, and it's just as likely to increase power consumption as to decrease it. The screen would still draw the same amount of power. All that you'd be saving is that the GPU wouldn't have to do as much work to shade pixels (i.e. determine the colour of each individual pixel) - but that would come at the ...


8

You haven't specified the Android version, but on tablets the difference is generally because the system bar (or "combined bar") is 48px (specifically, 48dpi, but in your case that's 48 real pixels) and the apps are only considering available screen space when they report the resolution: Portrait = 768 x (976 + 48) = 768 x 1024 Landscape = 1024 x (720 + 48) ...


6

If display service isn't available in dumpsys, you may look for line ro.sf.lcd_density= into /system/build.prop. To get it from phone: adb pull /system/build.prop


5

You can run su wm overscan LEFT,TOP,RIGHT,BOTTOM from Terminal (Superuser privileges needed) If you do not have Superuser privileges, you can hook your phone to a PC and run ADB command adb shell wm overscan 200,200,0,0 For example, to achieve what you've shown in the picture above try running wm overscan 200,200,0,0. But I must warn you, before ...


4

I had found a similar situation using a TVbox, a was trying to change the resolution to full HD (1920x1080), the solution was: Activate the Android as developer mode on TVBOX, via USB to USB cable execute the following command via command prompt: adb shell wm size 1920x1080 #To change resolution into FullHD or adb shell wm size 1280x720 #To change ...


4

To change the Resolution of BlueStack: Open ‘regedit': Start->Run->regedit Navigate to: 'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/BlueStacks/Guests/Android/FrameBuffer/0/’ Double click the value ‘GuestHeight’ Change Base to Decimal Input your desired Height resolution Double click the value ‘GuestWidth’ Change Base to Decimal Input your desired Height resolution ...


4

This answer from StackOverflow (How to change font size by adb command) provides a solution. The command used to set the font size is: adb shell settings put system font_scale {float_representing_the_scale} or if you are using a terminal emulator in Android settings put system font_scale {float_representing_the_scale} Examples: settings put system ...


3

I suspect the reduction in power consumption will not be significant, but you can easily test this yourself using free software like Trepn Profiler. Disclosure: I am part of the team that makes this software. Make sure to follow these best practices, if you want to get the most accurate results. Another method to measure power consumption is using Monsoon ...


3

After some more research, I found my answer: 360 x 640, which are the same dimensions as the Galaxy S6, which are the same dimensions as the few preceding Galaxy S models. But I still don't know what these dimensions are called. I found three different websites, each giving them a different term: design.google.com: "width x height in dp" mydevice.io/...


3

Thanks to eldarerathis comment. Indeed, I was able to set needed resolution by modifying kernel boot parameters. Instead of video=-16 in kernel boot options I use video=uvesa UVESA_MODE=1024x768 and all is working in native monitor resolution! More detailed description is here (in Russian language).


3

Having a different external display was one of the new features with Jelly Bean 4.2 You will need a siutable update for your S3 to stand a chance. What level of support you will get then is still in doubt depending upon the real hardware capabilities and what support Samsung put in.


3

How the webpage is displayed depends on your choice of brower and your settings. Chrome on my devices by default displays webpages by width in desktop mode, so I see the same content horizontally on my phone and Nexus 7. But I'd say the web browsing experience on Nexus 7 is much better than on a phone due to the large screen, you can definitely see more on ...


3

Hope this helps. On my Note3 running Lollipop I was able to check for supported external resolutions by running ( via a terminal app or adb shell ) >dmesg and ( filtering with grep ) looking for the lines: <6>[ 581.051746] hdmi_edid_add_sink_video_format: EDID: format: 1 [640x480 p60 4/3], Supported <6>[ 581.051756] ...


3

You can open the website in incognito mode. It will not redirect you to the Play Store


2

If you have root, you can edit your build.prop file. There even apps from the Play Store to do that for you. When changing LCD density (DPI), be cautious to what you change it to. Lower the value too much and items will be unreadable, also making the system unstable with certain apps. The Play Store might fail to work. As with everything, perform a backup ...


2

I don't launch from the command line, but this question came up while I was trying to solve a similar problem. I eventually solved it by replacing the hw.lcd.density value in the .android/avd/<avd_name>.avd/config.ini file with the value from this answer nearest to the value in the skin's hardware.ini file (in my case that's at <android-studio-...


2

Yes, most video players will automatically up- or down-scale videos to fit the screen. Android OS itself, and video player apps, don't have a limit on video size. Obviously each device's hardware is only fast enough to decode so many pixels per second, so there's an upper limit on video resolution, data rate, and frame rate for smooth playback. Like any ...


2

Even with development tools, screenshots are only of the pixel size of the device. You could try running the app in a emulator with higher resolution but all of those pixels may cause the emulator to lag. Or get a device like a Nexus 10 which runs at the higher resolutions.


2

On my Note3 running Lollipop I was able to check for supported external resolutions by running ( via a terminal app or adb shell ) >dmesg and ( filtering with grep ) looking for the lines: <6>[ 581.051746] hdmi_edid_add_sink_video_format: EDID: format: 1 [640x480 p60 4/3], Supported <6>[ 581.051756] hdmi_edid_add_sink_video_format: EDID: ...


2

As mentioned in @w3dk 's answer, you can't see any difference because you can't see any difference. As in, your eyes literally can not differentiate between the detail of the picture on either the Galaxy S3 and the Galaxy S6, because in either case, the picture resolution comes close to the eye's limit of resolution (the minimum angular separation of 2 ...


2

The metric 360 x 640 is in dp (device-independent pixels) and it is the dimension of the viewport at a 1x base size. This is not the same as the resolution, or physical pixel size. This is because the S7 has an XXXHDPI density factor of 4x, which means every graphic must be scaled x4 when exporting assets for this device. The resolution in actual pixels is ...


2

Using adb, no root required Use the command adb shell wm size 720x1280 Using phone, root required Download any Terminal app, such as this one. Type the command su to enter superuser mode, and then type wm size 720x1280 into the terminal. Source: http://www.theandroidsoul.com/change-screen-resolution-adb-android/


2

I got it. Short answer: This line should go in the bootloader for UEFI mode: set gfxpayload=1280x720 Explanation: On x86 systems, the kernel will be booted using the 32-bit boot protocol. Note that this means that the ‘vga=’ boot option will not work; if you want to set a special video mode, you will need to use GRUB commands such as set ...


2

Had the same problem and just figured it out. I hope the pictures work!


2

I fixed this by disabling and re enabling the application that was forcing my device in portrait mode. The application I was using was "Set orientation" V1.1.4 from package com.googlecode.eyesfree.setorientation.


1

I always keep this page bookmarked for things like this. You can make some educated guesses using this data. As of Feb 1 2016, the percentage of devices on an OS version pre-KitKat (if I did the math correctly) is 29.2%. Since 42.4% of all devices have hdpi screen density... At least 13.2% of all devices out there are hdpi with KitKat or later. It's ...


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