The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

92

All apps (root or not) have a default data directory, which is /data/data/<package_name>. By default, the apps databases, settings, and all other data go here. If an app expects huge amounts of data to be stored, or for other reasons wants to "be nice to internal storage", there's a corresponding directory on the SDCard (Android/data/<package_name&...


38

Recommended lecture: Why did /sdcard/ turn into /sdcard/0/ with 4.2?. In short: It has to do with the multi-user functionality introduced with Jelly Bean: /storage/emulated/0/: to my knowledge, this refers to the "emulated MMC" ("owner part"). Usually this is the internal one. The "0" stands for the user here, "0" is the first user aka device-owner. If you ...


37

/storage/emulated/0/Download is the actual path to the files. /sdcard/Download is a symlink to the actual path of /storage/emulated/0/Download However, the actual files are located in the filesystem in /data/media, which is then mounted to /storage/emulated/0 (and often other mountpoints as well) A Symlink In computing, a symbolic link is a term for any ...


29

You don't need to root your device. All you need to do is run the following command on a non-rooted (or rooted) device to allow termux to access your existing directories, particularly /storage/emulated/0: termux-setup-storage this creates a new directory in termux, ~/storage, which contains simlinks to /storage/emulated/0 and can be accessed by a standard ...


26

The reason is the history of Android: The first generation of Android devices only had a small amount of internal storage (around 100-400MiB) which was mounted under /data. Next, devices with a, at that time external, SD-card came out. The SD card was mounted under /mnt/sdcard. After that, devices with large internal storage came on the market. This ...


25

I usually use a combination of the following 4 commands and correlate them, since each of these commands gives a piece of the information that might be needed. Summarily: Using df lists the filesystem path alias and size info as seen below (total size, used, free and block size) Example output: root@ks01lte:/sdcard # df df Filesystem ...


17

If you're getting "storage space runout" on your Samsung S2 phone, just dial *#9900# on the tablet and select option 2 “Delete dumpstate/logcat” It's not necessary to root your android. Restart your phone afterwards.


17

A very easy way is ES File Explorer from Google Play Store. You can browse to your /system/app folder (for system apps) /data/app folder (for user apps; requires root to be accessed) and copy them to your /sdcard (or anywhere else). Copying multiple files with ES File Explorer is very easy. Just long hold one of the files, then put check marks on all the ...


16

Signed up to the site specifically to answer this question. I'm also using a Samsung Galaxy S2 with lots of storage but constantly full. I could not install applications or do pretty much anything. I'm using Cyanogenmod, but this applies to all Androids. What I did was using a file explorer with Root Permissions (to see all the files), navigated to the /...


15

From within Termux itself, you can change the current directory to the internal storage, by means of cd /storage/emulated/0 or cd /sdcard followed by enter. After that, create a new directory by using mkdir Directory and replace Directory with a name of your choice. You'll then have a new directory in your device's internal storage, whose data you'll ...


13

adb shell echo $EXTERNAL_STORAGE. All credit goes to Flow for leading me to experiment and find this. Naturally you can use cd $EXTERNAL_STORAGE or whatever else you might need during an adb shell session or from a terminal emulator.


13

On Samsung phones, type in the dialer *#9900# then choose the second option: "Delete Dumpstate/logcat".


13

/storage/emulated/0/ is actually /data/media/0/ exposed through an emulated / virtual filesystem, not the actual one. This is with reference to my previous answer here, but with more relevant details. ANDROID STORAGE: On Android 5: /sdcard >S> /storage/emulated/legacy >S> /mnt/shell/emulated/0 /mnt/shell/emulated >E> /data/media On ...


12

Marshmallow internal storage can be better used with a mixed-format SD card as I also explain in my blog here: http://blog.sam.liddicott.com/2016/02/android-6-semi-adopted-storage.html First, you need adb working. Have SD card inserted and formatted as portable. Eject your SD card from the Storage & USB menu Use "adb shell" to list your adoptable ...


11

It has worked on Kitkat so may apply to older versions of Android Settings > Storage > Phone Storage ( or could be Internal storage, wherever Google Play Services is) > apps > Google Play Services > Click Clear cache (on the same page) Manage space > Clear all data > Manage search storage > clear now press back button <- twice and you will end up on ...


10

The Google Music Apps cache is at /<external_SD>/Android/data/com.google.android.music/cache/music which is usually /sdcard/Android/data/com.google.android.music/cache/music


10

If the displayed detailed would be complete, you'd be correct: 1.28G + 7.28G + 200K + 282M + 762M = 9.6 GB total space -- while the summary says 13.24G. Explanation is easy: The details list is not complete. It e.g. misses Cache, temporary files, log files, tombstones, and probably some more. Where to find those? In the file system, and for completeness ...


10

Even though there already are many answers, there is actually none answering two main questions and the third one just for a case of dumpstate problem. Read just bigger text if you're in a hurry. Also, I'll explain why solutions mentioned in other answers help only sometimes. And offer another solution in case cat is not your problem. Why do I get Storage ...


9

If you are rooted, this is quite easy to find out. First you need to find the app's package name, e.g. com.swype.android.inputmethod for Swype, or com.google.android.apps.maps for Google Maps, for example. You can usually search for the app in Android Market, and the link will contain its package name, e.g. https://market.android.com/details?id=com.google....


9

Most probably your internal memory is too low. You can't access it without rooting your device. And it won't be visible in your PC/desktop anyways with a USB connection. (it can't be mounted) From what I understand your HTC Desire device has 512 MB of internal ROM which is used for both your stock firmware and user installed apps. The 512 MB storage ...


9

The answer to your question you are asking is too big. I can, however, give you a basic answer which covers the basics. There are two kinds of apps: Root and non-root. Root apps can basically store/modify files wherever they want. Non-root apps can only store/modify files here: /sdcard/ and every folder what comes after.Mostly, the installed apps store ...


9

It seems that, according to here, It's been supported since KitKat (whether using apps or not) But (as always) it's down to The OEM's discretion if a device can Run it. Chances are, If a device supports SD cards bigger than 32Gb, It supports SDXC, which has a exFAT filesystem (First Graph here)


8

I also had similar problem with HTC Desire. My solution was to use SD card as second partition for application's dex, lib and apk files. Now I have 1GB free space for applications to install. For this you need root. If you don't have rooted follow this simple process in this guide. After that you have to partition your SD card. You can use clockwork mod ...


8

The find command works well in adb shell. The syntax is find /path -name file_name. For searching read only areas you will need root. If the find command is not available on your particular device, you might need to install BusyBox (search the Market.) For example, adb shell find / -name *maps* will find all files that contain word "maps" across the entire ...


8

Yes you have full 16GB for apps+data together in a single file system. You won't have to do any moving to SD card any more. Google merged both partitions. It's just one big file system now with sections for the former parts. It's completely transparent, so no worries for you. Formerly: /data and /sdcard were separate partitions Galaxy Nexus / Nexus 7 and ...


8

Unfortunately the Google Camera app does not natively support saving pictures/videos/panoramas to SD Card. I am guessing that this goes with Google's general stance against SD cards in general. If your device is not rooted, you are stuck with having to manually move the images/videos. For rooted devices, there is a work-around to this limitation. Xposed ...


7

I checked several sources on this. Googles own help page states: The Google Play Books app automatically stores books in the location with the most free space, whether that's your device or your SD card, as of when the app was first launched. If you've upgraded your app, your books will continue to be stored in the same location they were before the ...


7

System memory, internal memory is a mis-leading thing, its actually referring to storage space which is a very different thing to the meaning RAM often referred as memory! The reference to storage - system as in /system would be more accurate. When you download an app from the Play Store, it must be installed into the /data. From there you can actually ...


7

Apk and zip files are essentially the same, compressed. Before the system can use the file it needs to decompressed. So the file is one size when downloaded and another size when installed. Also note sometimes when apk's are installed, after being opened some data may need to be downloaded. So file size file will increase again. Differences in size are ...


7

The Google play store, and other app stores, only list the main application (APK) size, not the total app size, which includes the OBB (Opaque Binary Blob) expansion files. OBBs are the extra files that an app downloads to run. There should be no difference in file size before the extra files are downloaded. From the Play Store Developers section: The ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible