23

Root access (typically) requires several components that work in concert with one another. A somewhat simplified view of what you need is: A native su binary. This can be invoked from the command line or from applications. It is what actually performs the act of switching users, and grants a process root permission. A "gatekeeper" application, that ...


14

Root permissions and kernel mode are not the same thing. Programs with root access can access part of the kernel, but root is not the kernel itself. The Android (and Linux) user model has a set of users, each part of a set of groups. These groups are used to manage which users are allowed access to what. For example, in Linux you could set up all printer ...


9

Download Root Checker and see if phone is still rooted. If it isn't rooted anymore, re-root your phone.


8

On this question, you might want to check an article on GetAndroidStuff called Superuser vs SuperSU. Quoting: SuperSU improves everything about Superuser and adds more options. The free version offers faster notifications, there is possibility of disabling them for each app and a new interface, attractive and easy to handle. In addition, according to ...


7

Most superuser apps don't allow adb su access by default. Depending on the app you used the option may vary in location, but basically you need to go to settings in the superuser app and change it from "apps only" to "apps and adb." This should allow you to use su in an adb shell.


7

Just installing SuperSU don't give you root - it's only tool for controlling access to root account on rooted device. From app's description: SuperSU requires a rooted device !!!


7

On Nexus devices, at least: CF Auto-Root works by unlocking the device's boot loader via fastboot (if it isn't already unlocked), then sending the device a custom boot image (kernel and ramdisk) that it should run instead of booting from the built-in system or recovery partition. It's analogous to booting your PC from a CD or USB drive instead of from the ...


5

Just re-root. Your bootloader is still unlocked, so nothing is preventing you from doing so. The Nexus Root Toolkit should do the heavy lifting for you if you want (just press "Root"). Manual steps would be: Download a custom recovery, like ClockworkMod, and save it to your computer Download the Superuser/su package for ARM and copy it to your phone Reboot ...


5

The Superuser website explains it as such: Ghost mode – Hide Superuser from your app tray and home screen. With ghost mode activated, the only way to launch it is by dialing a secret code into the dialer. The default secret code is *#*#787378737#*#*, but it can be set to whatever you want. Note that this feature will probably be disabled if your ...


4

When coming from Linux/Unix, you may be confused because su == root, and that is also true on Android, but with a small addition: A 'rooted' android device has a setuid root 'su' binary to allow a process to get root, but the version typically used on android doesn't allow just any process to use it to get root. It uses an android intent to communicate ...


4

Run the SuperSU app. If you’ve uninstalled it for whichever reason, all you need to do is Reinstall it from the Google Play Store. Click on the Settings tab on the top right corner, and then click Full Unroot. Confirm with 'Continue'. Once this operation is done, which takes a few minutes, you can reboot your Android. Uninstall SuperSU.( If Exists.....)


4

Basically it is possible to control/watch over every data transferred by just analyzing the traffic. To do so you could use something like Wireshark, but then a lot of Internet traffic today is encrypted, which would make it impossible to gain anything from it. To access the data of connected devices would require certain other tools and would very likely ...


4

Yes - if you grant it root privileges, it can Theoretically access any other apps data ( granting / denying is by "Superuser or Su" which is used to manage applications which are allowed to gain root access). That is a con of rooting. But if the data is encrypted it shouldn't be able to unless it is a rogue app which is capable of doing so Aside, if you ...


3

Android has a chain of signature verification that (by default) protects your device from being hacked or having an unofficial image installed. Recovery images, updates, and OS images all have to be signed. The bootloader verifies that the recovery is signed by the manufacturer's key, and the recovery in turn verifies that the OS image (and any updates you ...


3

I have had this issue and there are 3 ways to try to get around this. You will need a custom recovery to attempt 1. or you can use Odin alternatively for 2. below. The superSU binaries are often (but not always) installed via recovery and the app itself gives this option. When superSU asks you to update the binaries, rather than select 'Normal' select '...


3

Because you still have a working CWM, you can just reflash it. There are 2 competing implementations: SuperSU from Chainfire Superuser from ChainsDD Most rooting utilities install the latter, so you're safe to also flash this.


3

You are rooted. AFAIK Samsung bootloaders are already unlocked, you only need to flash the recovery to get the "root" Now for the problem. Go to settings->about phone and tap the build number 7 times to enable developer options. Then go to settings->developer options and there you should be an option similar to root access. Make sure you select Apps ...


3

SuperSU is no more actively developed, the new prevailing standard is Magisk which was originally based on SuperSU (ideas and perhaps some code too) but now it has moved far ahead. So better go for a new actively maintained open-source solution wherever possible. Or if you want some adventure, try this: How to manually root a phone?. My answer to How Magisk ...


3

The reason the command isn't working for you is because "su" is a binary that gets installed by rooting your device. Without a proper root you have no "su" command. In order to use the dirtycow exploit you have to compile the binary for your device's architecture. Head over to https://github.com/timwr/CVE-2016-5195 and download or git clone the files. (...


2

There are a few scenarios that might explain what's going on. Superuser app binaries need to be updated Open your Superuser app and check for any updates to the binaries. The binary is what gives that Superuser app the right to grant or deny other apps superuser priviliges. If it is outdated or has been replaced by a different binary, you may need to ...


2

Yup using root is the only way to go. All other groups or username are locked in userland of Android by a technique known as sandboxing. This is security feature implemented at the core so you will need to rework Android if you still want to succeed.


2

Most recoveries don't work in root mode - and root mode cannot be acheived, as the SU binary calls your superuser app to gain permission to use root mode. As the su binary cannot call the app, it stops you using SU mode. It could also be due to the fact that the su file used in recovery is the stock su file found in Android, and this doesn't let you switch ...


2

An unlocked bootloader is the precondition to mod a phone. It's not the same as having root; it just allows you to install a custom recovery and a different boot.img. You need to flash a CWM recovery and a compatible gain-root.zip or just start all over and install a real ROM like CyanogenMod (hope your model's supported) What you gain from having an ...


2

Install SuperSU instead of SuperUser. Worked for me!


2

For setting file permissions, you can use the chmod command. The permissions shown are basically split in 3 parts, each consisting of 3 chars: a triple for the owner, the group, and for "others". Usually, each triple holds definitions for reading, writing, and executing a file; so rwx means "can read, write, and execute", while r-- would say "can only read". ...


2

Steps : Install custom recovery TWRP(Download link) Install SuperSU from recovery also, take a look at this : [GUIDE] Root XT1032/XT1033 Moto G Running Android Lollipop just do it with above link instruction.


2

Reboot into recovery after copying this file into root of your SD card. Flash this file using a custom recovery like CWM . Reboot phone. Check for SuperSu in your app drawer. SuperSu 2.46


2

It seems Moto G 3rd Gen is very tricky to root. I spent 2 days trying countless things and having countless problems every step of the way. I drove myself insane with it, however at the end, it worked and my Moto G 3rd Gen is rooted now. For everyone else experiencing problems with rooting this device here is some info on what to do: 1. Bootloader Unlock ...


2

You misunderstand the logic of su binary. Android doesn't have an su command like other Linux distros do. The su binaries we use on Android are added to the /system (for pre-6.0 versions) and they are customized to work with the GUI application (such as SuperSU) So when you run an application that wants to run as root, it sends out a call to su binary. ...


2

You did it wrong I guess. Despite all the tutorials you found online, I wonder how you missed the right one : There's a "safe" uninstall feature within Kingoroot app. This removes completely the app and the binaries from your device. Open the app Click three dots upper right, find settings menu. Click "Remove Root". Your device will be rebooted and root ...


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