68

Yes. The command is pm disable <package name>. You must be root in order to do this: Open shell and get root: PC> adb shell shell@hammerhead:/ $ su List all enabled apps, filter by "calculator": root@hammerhead:/ # pm list packages -e | grep 'calculator' package:com.android.calculator2 Disable app: root@hammerhead:/ # pm disable com.android....


13

You can disable only System apps from Android 4.0 onwards. Check the guide here with video. Basically you have to: Go to your phone’s main settings menu. Go to the “Apps” or “Applications” option. Go to the “All” tab in your list of apps. Find the app you wish to disable and tap on it. Press the disable button next to the force stop button. ...


13

Unfortunately, that is just not possible. The apk of system apps resides within system partition. The privileges (access rights) required to make changes in system partition are not given to ordinary users. We can only gain such higher privilege through rooting. That said, if you are dealing with space issues than you are looking at wrong front. System ...


9

Navigate to Settings > Application Manager > All Then select Reset App Preferences from the menu. Try if this works, it worked for me for some other apps.


9

Carl Parker writes about it on Android Authority: (partly reproduced here in case the original post goes down) For Apps Installed on the Device Assuming you have installed the app on your device, go to the app’s Google Play Store link and take note of the words after “?id=” and ignore the rest. Connect your device to the computer via USB ...


7

Further to the answer by @eldarerathis, you can disable an app for a specific user. I used this method to remove some apps from a restricted user that weren't listed on the user settings screen. All commands from an adb shell. Root access is required to make changes. Firstly, get the user's id: $ pm list users Users: UserInfo{0:Alice:13} running ...


6

YES, you can delete the stock Email (Email.apk) and stock Calendar (Calendar.apk, CalendarProvider.apk) app. For a list of other apps you can delete on CyanogenMod, see the expandable list at the bottom of the CM wiki. I'm not so sure for AOSP though.


6

Carl Parker writes about it on Android Authority: (partly reproduced here in case the original post goes down) For Apps Installed on the Device Assuming you have installed the app on your device, go to the app’s Google Play Store link and take note of the words after “?id=” and ignore the rest. Connect your device to the computer via USB ...


5

Requirement: Rooted phone Samsung Phone AccountAndSyncSettings.apk -- NO, Sync settings, this is required, even if out don´t sync, this is because it syncs more than just calendar and contacts, it is the effective sync to your google account, required for just about anything. ApplicationsProvider.apk -- NO, required for application installation and ...


5

What is factory reset? First, the word "factory reset" might be a bit misleading -- as one can easily tell by your first comment to your question: If the device ships with Gingerbread (Android 2.3.x) pre-installed, and after a while offers an update to e.g. Ice Cream Sandwhich (Android 4.0.x) which you perform -- a factory-reset thereafter will not reset it ...


5

This should work regardless whether the app is a system app or a third-party app (user installed). See my answer at Determine the package name of your app to get the package name of the concerned app and use adb shell to execute these commands (requires root access): adb shell su pm disable PACKAGE # disables the app and hides it in Settings ->...


4

As long as you have the release key (or whatever key you use) used sign the app in the /system you could just quickly side-load your application: adb install -r bin/my-signed-app.apk Note the '-r' option. This will update the application, but not remove/update the apk file in /system or clear the user's data. You might have to clear the data first due ...


4

Izzy opined it correctly here that the only sensible place for having factory home screen layout is the launcher's APK itself. Since I don't own a Lenovo device let alone your specific model I used my MTK device running stock 4.2.1 as the testing ground. It has stock launcher (com.android.launcher). About that thing called factory home screen layout -- ...


4

Is it safe to disable com.android.systemui? from Stack overflow : If you completely remove SystemUI.apk from the system, your device will hang on start-up and never fully boot again. Tried it before. ;) Framework-res and the system have some dependencies on SystemUI. Please also read the comments where OP did what you proposed and is warned that it could ...


4

You can simply copy the apk (its name not relevant) into /system/app or /system/priv-app, set the appropriate permissions (rw-r-r, root:root) and then do a reboot. That's it. Works well on Android 6.0.1.


3

Have you restarted your device since removing the app? If you've simply deleted the .apk using Root Explorer then then it won't have performed the 'cleanup' that normally happens when uninstalling an application. Restarting your device should cause the app drawer to re-detect the installed apps and the icon should disappear. This answer (relevant part ...


3

First of all you don't tell us what exactly apps you uninstalled there is a chance that you uninstalled some app that cannot be replaced by just adding gapps. Varius gapps for all the versions can be found here https://goo.im/gapps/ please be carefull to choose the right version according to the version of Android installed on your smartphone. You should ...


3

Aside from rooting (temporarily or permanently), you can't disable the system apps prior to Android 4. Your particular case may have a ray of hope, though. Alternate app responding to Intent If the navigation app is responding to an Intent, you could try to find a different app that responds to the same Intent. You'd get a pop-up to choose which app to ...


3

Your chances for #2 are pretty good – though there might be some caveats. To figure which those are, let's take a look of what a factory-reset does. It... wipes /data wipes /cache wipes the dalvik cache (usually implicitly, as in most cases this resides in /data; I guess with Lollipop it will do the same for ART). So you see, /system remains untouched. ...


3

There is an answer to your question here. Posted as an answer because I can't comment yet. In short, you can't. The Samsung Apps need the Touchwiz framework to work. However, you can find alternatives to the apps here.


3

It is possible (at least in my device) and I've provided a generalized idea using my Mediatek device running Android 4.2.1. The idea is very simple. Most of the notes apps I tried so far stores the notes inside a .db file located in their personal space under /data. We have to get the relevant .db file(s) and then export it into a .csv file. For a non-...


3

You can solve that as follows: Completely delete the old F-Droid app (e.g. uninstall using Titanium Backup) Get the latest .apk from F-Droid and put it on your device (either download directly with your Android web browser, or use adb push) Login to your device either via a terminal app or using adb shell Obtain root privileges by executing the command su ...


3

Uninstalling updates to a system app does clear the data, tested by uninstalling a system app with data and observing the storage consumed by the data portion of the app go to 0.00B. For reference, it also outputs intents broadcasting android.intent.action.PACKAGE_REMOVED just as if the entire app had been uninstalled as usual.


3

Okay, I got it working. Here's how I did it: Copy the APK file to /system/app/some-folder/ or /system/priv-app/xyz-folder/. Keeping them in their own folders may/will prevent conflicts. Some apps want to have their libs and other files extracted and placed alongside the APK in specific folders, although they're pretty rare. Try checking out some folders of ...


3

You can change the behavior of holding home button even as non-root user (at least on my LG G Flex 2 with Android version 6.0.1): Settings - Apps - Configure apps - Default Apps (in Advanced section) - Assist & voice input - here touch the text "Assist app Google app" not the icon on the right edge - here select None.


3

If your phone isn't rooted, then none of the apps can get root access, regardless of whether they are installed as system app. Also, I quite doubt how you can install extra system apps without root. Rooting may require a custom recovery and may not be easily done with only ADB.


3

I think you misunderstand the whole process. You are not supposed to use install command or the likes of it anywhere in the process I mentioned. You simply: mount the system partition in rw mode copy-paste the apk into the location, set the appropriate permissions using busybox's chmod and chgrp or through inbuilt tools: adb shell su -c chmod 644 APK # ...


3

You probably did cross-compilation badly. As file suggests, the dynamic linker for the binary is /lib/ld-linux-aarch64.so.1, which doesn't exist on Android. Android's linker is located at /system/bin/linker (32-bit) and /system/bin/linker64. You need to specify this path as the dynamic linker when compiling. You may try symlink-ing the Android dynamic ...


3

While revoking a runtime manifest permission requested by an app, the system warning: “If you deny this permission, basic features of your device may no longer function as intended.” is displayed by PackageInstaller if the permission was GRANTED_BY_DEFAULT: ~$ pm dump packages | grep -E 'Package |GRANTED_BY_DEFAULT' | grep -B1 android.permission All ...


2

Solved it by clicking reset app preference from the action bar in Settings


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