Hot answers tagged

63

There are a few methods how you can mount your /system directory RW or RO. However, it will require root. Method 1: Connect your phone to the computer. (Make sure USB debugging is enabled on your phone) Open CMD/Terminal on your PC. Windows: CTRL + R, then type cmd. Ubuntu: CTRL + ALT + T. Mac: Navigate to /Applications/Utilities/ and double-click on ...


48

In the realm of the ARM chipsets which is the common factor, the entire Android stack, from the near-identical kernel based on Linux, are in fact, 32bit, cross-compiled from usually either a 32bit/64bit host environment, the host environment is usually one of the distributions of Linux. Recommended distribution, by Google, for building and cross-compiling ...


23

No, that is impossible -- as only root can make the system partition writable (which is required to delete a system app, which is stored there). However, using ICS (Android 4.0) or above, you can at least "freeze" them (make it "invisible and unusable") -- and, if you later decide otherwise, also unfreeze them again (see e.g. How to Remove / Disable the ...


22

The other answers are correct, but fail to point out a couple differences: Permissions System apps are granted the ability to request certain system-only permissions that are never available to user apps. This is not the same as root/sudo/su permissions. One example that I know of and use daily is the ability to reset the missed call notification counter....


20

/system is read-only without root so it prevents uninstalling applications from /system/app and /system/priv-app. Applications that are critical are put there so that they can't be uninstalled. Carrier bloatware that they don't want to let you remove is also put there. The latter category of apps can be removed if you are rooted; the former, not so much. ...


19

You may also use ADB to remove applications, but the application methods are easier. Since use of ADB does not require a market, this will work for users who are rooted but who cannot or do not wish to use Android market or similar marketplaces. ./adb remount #ROOT IS REQUIRED TO REMOUNT /system read-write ./adb shell cd /system/app To see what's installed:...


19

Yes, you actually can do this. It's kind of kludgy looking when you inspect the clipboard, but it works just fine. First off, you can inspect the current clipboard contents with service call clipboard 1 from an adb shell (or, without shelling in first, adb shell service call clipboard 1). It may start out initially blank after a reboot, for example: # ...


18

For easier reference: Source: XDA


17

I assume that you mean on the graph you get if you go to Settings -> About Phone -> Battery Use and tap the graph at the top? I have a signal strength line there, under the battery level graph that has many colours in it that's labelled "Phone Signal" on my device. (full size) The reason it's there is that your signal strength can have a big effect on your ...


15

You can't remove them without root, they're installed to a directory that cannot be accessed without root. However, you can do the next best thing, close your eyes, stick your fingers in your ears, and go la-la-la-la, pretending they don't exist. The way to do this is to get a launcher (such as ADW if memory serves), that allows you to hide icons. In that ...


10

I used this methodology, and it worked fine in 4.x, but failed for me in lollipop. While looking for alternative solution, I found this: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3391160/paste-text-on-android-emulator it is not exactly as you wanted it, but for myself, most time I want to copy text to clipboard is because I want to paste it into password field. ...


10

I agree with Izzy's answer mostly, however technically it is possible to do so without. Background: System apps reside at /system/app/* /system is a separate partition that is mounted read-only during normal use Some phones (HTC) even lock the flash partition to disallow any write Normally one gains root on the normal system to make /system writeable and ...


9

Social Networking Service. I believe it's used for social networking widgets. Clearing the data will just clear the posts and account info in the widgets. I'm not sure if the Facebook or other apps rely on it.


8

Some applications require what is known as WebView, a mini browser for functions like approving logins from Facebook and Google+. This is essentially a miniature version of Chrome. It used to be that WebView only updated with the OS. In Lollipop, Google detached it from the Core OS in a way, and added the functionality for it to be updated via Google Play, ...


7

Originally, Android was written for 32-bit processors only: and specifically, 32-bit ARM processors. Later, Intel and MIPS invested a lot into making Android support their architectures too: but still only 32-bit processors. They were able to do this without (many) compatibility problems, because most apps aren't shipped as binaries. Written in Java, they ...


7

I just tried and found that you need to modify a file: sys/class/power_supply/usb/device/charge its default content is '1' which means 'enable charging' you need to set it to '0' to 'disable charging' $ su $ echo 0 > /sys/class/power_supply/usb/device/charge I tested on Nexus 4 and it's working successfully.


6

The setting you are looking for is, most likely, found in Settings → Development (might be called "Developer options"; I know on some ROMs this option is initially hidden -- but if it's hidden in your case, it would be funny how that CPU overlay was activated). Scroll down a bit there, and you should find the "Monitoring" section -- where you probably ...


6

WARNING: I have not tested this procedure. You would need to have fstrim in system/bin. This XDA post has a DropBox download link. start up adb and then switch users to root. $ adb shell from your os terminal. $ su to switch to the root user. To copy fstrim to your /system/bin path you first need to mount the system path as Read/Write from adb or some ...


6

Root: As you understand, "root" in this context refers to the ability to grant a user the privileges of the root user. It's similar to installing sudo on a linux box (but Android root uses su, so there's that fundamental but small difference). We have a tag-wiki for it which has more information: root. Flashing: In the world of embedded systems, mobile ...


6

“There is in fact a second battery in every phone.” (Cf. answers 15., 19. and 48. of this discussion.)


6

Solution is simple. To remount a mounted system you need to have root privileges. Do an su. You will enter root mode. Then run the below command. It will work, I did it many a times. So here are the steps: adb shell su mount -o rw,remount -t ext4 /system Edit: Found a better solution From host machine(Linux or windows PC), execute the following ...


6

data/system folder contains system configuration files critical to maintaining device's state. Access to the directory is restricted by the system apps only, so if the device is not rooted the folder content can't be seen. Below is the list of files residing in the directory with a brief description. Note that the list is not completely full and also may ...


6

What is Android doing when it says “optimizing apps/system”? Basically the android system will be creating an optimised version of each application. This process makes each app start as fast as possible with the new Android version. While it says ‘optimising,’ operating system generates ‘odex’ files for your apps from scratch. As a simple explanation, ...


5

There are several ways to collect this type of information, I'll be speaking about two that I use on a daily basis as to oversee what's going on with my devices: Terminal Using a terminal application, you are able to run Linux commands like top or ps that provide information about the currently running processes: ps ps (i.e., process status) displays ...


5

There is absolutely no way to do this without root, and for a good reason. If an app was do do this imagine the havok that would ensue? You will have to root your device, either temporarily or permanently, to do this.


5

All ARM chips are currently 32-bit. Because of this, Android currently executes all code in a 32-bit environment. 64-bit processors set to launch in 2014.


5

Oh dear, the moment I offer a bounty on this question, I bump into the solution myself. Cyanogenmod has a "Dev Tools" app. In "Development Settings" in this app, uncheck "Show running processes" to make this go away.


5

Yes there is: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.into.stability But if you don't have root, then it is a bit limited in features.


5

There's no direct equivalent in Android. Each app has its own directory in /data/data (for a multi-user system, it's /data/users/n). Apps are encouraged to show a metadata-based view of user data, instead of requiring the user to worry about individual files. Each app stores the files and databases that hold its documents, and its configuration files, in its ...


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