5

You are mixing up two things: Installing a binary like busybox system wide from within an app (which includes grep) Running a binary The default app based installers for busybox require root access to install busybox system-wide. This is true, however this is just because it is an app. Once the binary is installed you don't need root access. Additionally ...


4

Android Location Service comes with different options: 1) High Accuracy: gps, network Enable: adb shell settings put secure location_providers_allowed +gps,network Disable: adb shell settings put secure location_providers_allowed -gps,network 2) Phone Only: gps Enable: adb shell settings put secure location_providers_allowed +gps Disable: ...


3

This answer from StackOverflow (How to change font size by adb command) provides a solution. The command used to set the font size is: adb shell settings put system font_scale {float_representing_the_scale} or if you are using a terminal emulator in Android settings put system font_scale {float_representing_the_scale} Examples: settings put system ...


2

If you are using Android Lollipop or above, install Termux, install grep (if not already installed) by typing apt install grep, give Storage permission to Termux from Settings app so that Internal Storage can be accessed. And that's it. Enjoy your grep. You can also install busybox the same way in Termux (it appears to come installed with Termux per user ...


2

Standard lsof source code has some differences with Android implementation. Android's own /system/bin/lsof or /vendor/bin/lsof (both provided by toybox) work perfectly, but with somewhat limited options. However, to view listening ports, you have multiple options: netstat static binary compiled from standard source Netstat Plus app Netstat applet shipped ...


2

Ubuntu for PC is permanently rooted. It comes with root user as well as with the mechanism to allow a process to gain superuser privilege when requested so and authenticated by the user (that which you considered temporary root). Android devices, on the other hand, do not provide the mechanism to gain superuser access. That mechanism, often involves ...


1

As shown here, you can use these commands: am start -a com.llamalab.automate.intent.action.START_FLOW -d content://com.llamalab.automate.provider/flows/13/statements/1 or am start -a com.llamalab.automate.intent.action.START_FLOW -d content://com.llamalab.automate.provider/flows/13/statements/1 -n com.llamalab.automate/.StartServiceReceiver Replace ...


1

In addition to noexec mount option, /sdcard is emulated filesystem with fixed file permissions. So files can't be set executable. But some file explorers like MiXplorer support executing binaries/scripts from /sdcard through /system/bin/sh. /data/local has permissions 0751, owner root.root 1, so normal apps can't access it. However from adb shell use /data/...


1

ROOT USER AND SELINUX: User root (with UID 0) is the super user in Discretionary Access Control (DAC) implementation of *NIX operating systems. DAC is allowed by-default i.e. anyone can access anything unless UIDs, GIDs and permission mode restrict something. So root can do anything because it's the kernel's SUPER USER who isn't denied anything. SELinux is ...


1

You could use UserLAnd, GNURoot Debian, or Termux. Termux is probably the most lightweight, and also has Swipe keyboard support (have to swipe the entire input to the side to access it), and you can enable an extended keyboard that pops up over whatever keyboard you use to access arrows, Tab, Ctrl, etc. UserLAnd also has the extended keyboard but no Swipe ...


1

Simply, you can't. Because of how the permissions work in Linux, what android is built on, you are required to use a root account to make those changes. The root account being su, which is only accessible when you have a rooted device. To my knowledge there is no way around that, even using alternate commands that might exist.


1

In Android 4.0 you could do this easy, you would need root permissions though. You most likely still can with root. Just checked can do easy with root. /System/usr/keylayout there are a couple files in there with keyboard layouts that you can edit with root permission. You can veiw but not edit in fx file manager, there are other files that control the same ...


1

For me, this worked: adb shell "su -c 'boot-recovery > /cache/recovery/command'" You start with a double quote before su -c. Then single quote for the command, a single quote after the command and close with a double quote.


1

Adb is a two-part system, the "ADB" command that runs on your computer, and a daemon that runs on the device to receive the commands you send to it. To run it on the device you need a version of ADB that is compiled to run on the device. There are several of these on the play store (Search "Adb Shell") on Google Play, such as Adb Shell. There is also an "...


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