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SHORT ANSWER: Android phones are more brickable than PCs because they can hardly communicate with us if the bootloader is erased. And bootloader(s) live on Flash memory (eMMC) partitions which are prone to deletion quite easily (even during an update process). If you unluckily damage these partitions or they are worn out, there is a great chance you won't ...


8

From @AndrewT 's comment, I gathered this: Referring this answer on StackOverflow What does stop do? stop entered in a root terminal basically stops the Android process called zygote. This in turn stops all processes registered in the context of zygote, that is, all services (including system services) registered to zygote. This includes the ...


7

This may not be as easy as you think. The eMMC is connected to the board with a Ball Grid Array (BGA) connection, which is pretty difficult to reconnect once removed. You can see photos of the chip and more discussion on the topic on this XDA post. As for where the chip is, you might be able to find it on some teardowns, but my eyes didn't catch it in ...


7

Episode 3: Return of the Shell. If I ever had any chance of solving this, I first had to figure out why the shell wasn't working. adbd itself was responding, so it was started on the tablet side - but it could not execute the shell, even when I hack-patched it to invoke a file (/sbin/sh) that I myself placed in the boot image - being 100% sure that it had ...


6

Proper research would have prevented this, in the future if you need information on rooting a device, go to a REPUTABLE source like XDA or a similar forum and make sure the information is specific to your device AND the current Android version. Lollipop, Marshmallow, and now Nougat are changing the way rooting is being done. All retail/unlocked Moto devices ...


5

It's a chip soldered to the main board in the phone. You can only remove it by desoldering it from the board in a soldering oven. (This is a precisely temperature-controlled device: a kitchen oven won't do.) Even if you did manage to desolder it safely, the chip itself isn't a lot of use to you. Because it's an internal component, it doesn't fit into a ...


4

JTAG is a Protocol ! Simply in other Protocols such as USB is protocol UART is protocol for transferring DATA or communicating with devices . JTAG Directly communicate with the CPU and with the help of CPU's JTAG Protocol you can access CPU's peripherals and memory/NAND/eMMC one of this peripherals . In order to relate directly answer to your question ...


4

Since you do have working fastboot access, you have a few options from there: You can... Get a custom recovery like TWRP. Then run fastboot flash recovery /path/to/twrp.img. With TWRP, you can to try to reinstall ROMS, do factory resets, and make backups of your current system (Which may be a good idea, even if it's bricked). Do a factory reset with ...


4

Samsung devices can usually be forced into download mode using a JIG. They are pretty simple and cheap to make. If your device has been soft-bricked this will almost always work. http://www.xda-developers.com/need-a-samsung-usb-jig-build-your-own/


4

It seems you've already found some kind of solution to your problem (there's a lot of text to read on this page), but it seems this probably could have been resolved much more simply. linuxbox# fastboot getvar all (bootloader) version-bootloader: 3.03 (bootloader) version-hardware: rev_c (bootloader) variant: LEOPARDCAT 16G (bootloader) version-baseband:...


4

I've got the same problem on a recent OTA update on my Nexus 9. Unfortunately thes "Nexus Root Toolkit" app didn't help because my Nexus 9 was all stock, no root and the OEM unlock was disabled. The problem got me into a dead end. But I found a solution that helped me out and now my Nexus 9 is alive again. It's simple, but you need to follow the steps ...


3

Ok Solved! We have Operation! Here is what happened. Fastboot format data failed "cannot format partition type ' ' Please Enter Password: Error Popped up in TWRP when I had never set one and when I tried to do anything it could never mount /system or /cache or anything I did fastboot flash recovery Clockwork recovery zip and from there I got the error '...


3

Thank god I figured out how to fix it. The problem was that I was using software that was meant to root a first gen Nexus 7, and I had the second gen (2013) version. Whoops. In order to fix it, I downloaded the Unroot/Stock Toolkit from http://www.androidrootz.com/2013/08/nexus-7-one-click-toolkit-for-mac-2013.html and then downloaded the factory images ...


3

This is mostly speculation, but mediaserver is probably what is used to play all and any sound on android. Some app was probably using mediaserver inappropriately, causing it to show as using excessive battery. logcat2 is probably the process used for logging output, and is where many debug and error messages are sent to. Outright deleting them probably ...


3

I thought I could use my nandroid backup to flash system.img, etc. to overwrite what's there but it's one big .win file. So I looked up the fastboot commands anyways and stumbled on an xda thread about un-bricking TF300s where they used fastboot erase on every mount point then fastboot flashed the stock firmware blob file from Asus' support website. Ran ...


3

Note: Keep in mind, Samsung Galaxy S2 has infamous Superbrick bug. Every flash can result in permanent brick (only board changing or maybe JTAG unit can recover device). You can learn more about it here. Note2 : Last resort to enter Download mode is to get USB JIG. There is plenty of this on Internet and it's very cheap. Also there is tutorials on Internet ...


3

I had a similar problem a few years ago with my old HTC EVO 3D which was also running cyanogenmod at this time. I tried flashing different roms and kernels but the problem was persistent. Because my battery was empty as yours is at the moment, I charged it by cutting a USB Cable and applying "+" and "-" to the battery directly. It looked really bad to be ...


3

As far as I know, your device is not that hard bricked, that you can't boot into the bootloader (fastboot mode). so at every time you should be able to install a custom recovery via fastboot flash recovery recovery.img. if you are in recovery mode with a working recovery, you can do a factory reset (reflash the system, root,... partitions from a protected ...


3

Nobody will give you any guarantee – but a few hints we can give. I'm using Xposed on multiple devices, and encountered no issues. So here a few points to consider: before installing Xposed, make a full backup (best a nandroid backup) – so you always can revert in case things go weird. make sure your device has a custom recovery (in fact, that's a pre-...


3

The device was not bricked. After a few hours I held down the power button again, and the frozen screen was replaced by the "no battery" screen. After charging, the device is back to normal. I caution users of this particular device not to use apps that try to force the systemwide screen orientation. It was lucky that the battery was nearly empty when this ...


3

Provided your device is rooted, you can do that with simple dd commands. Trouble is just to find out what partitions you might need to backup: some devices have more than 20 partitions, and you will most likely not need more than 5 backed up. This is where e.g. my little tool Adebar comes in which, amongst others, creates you a script for exactly this ...


3

This most probably means that you are stuck in a device boot-loop. The easiest way to fix Nexus devices (in my opinion) is to use the Nexus Root Toolkit, which automatically fixes most problems with a click of a button. You'll need a machine running windows and a USB cable to make this work. First, install Nexus Root Toolkit on Windows. After the setup is ...


3

Fully draining the battery will unbrick an Azpen A746HD in this situation. I did further testing and was able to repeat the conditions for bricking and unbricking the tablet: Running adb reboot bootloader will render the tablet unbootable as described in the original question (hard-brick). Fully draining the battery will clear out whatever issue was ...


3

For linux use this link it's a tool called SALT. If you're good with Linux there are tools to use with Python such as ESPTools or LGLAF. For Windows look up FWUL, it's "Forget Windows Use Linux", it's a variant of Linux build for this purpose but they were built for the older models. The easiest is to use LG Bridge or LG Mobile Support tool if windows ...


3

/dev/mmcblk0 is whole MMC storage chip which includes GUID partition table (GPT) and all partitions. On Android devices some of these eMMC partitions hold bootloaders (like sbl, aboot on Qualcomm devices) which have hard-coded paths in SoC firmware. Fully overwriting (erasing) such partitions means the SoC won't be able to boot device. Since fastboot and ...


3

Just in case anyone else comes this way searching for an answer, I did get one on the XDA forums. The solution is to start the device with volume down and power pressed. This brings you to the menu I described in my original post. Select the Reboot in Android recovery option. Once you get the dead android logo hold power then press and release volume up, ...


2

if your android has search button then you are lucky first hard reset your android(learn how to hard reset your mobile) after the mobile started running hit search button and search the app 'settings' then turn bluetooth on and select discoverable or visible then share any launcher (like smart launcher) from other android to your mobile then install it and ...


2

Download the Launcher .apk file (just Google your "demand launcher name" and plus "apk"), save it to your friend's phone, and send it to your phone via Bluetooth. After you recieve the .apk file just click whatever option that directs you to INSTALL the file. If Bluetooth is off, ask your friend to call your phone; when the dialer window pops up you can ...


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Plug it into your computer and see if by some offshoot chance you have adb available. If so, run a adb -d reboot-bootloader to reboot into download mode. If that's unavailable, you are SOL and will have to have Samsung repair it. Honestly, if it's hard bricked, you're better off buying a new phone...


2

A "factory reset" only wipes the user data from the device: it doesn't touch the system apps or operating system at all. You need to either find the APK file you're missing (perhaps from a friend with the same phone) and install it as a system app via adb (since you can't use the phone normally), or find the stock ROM and reflash it onto your phone using the ...


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