16

You'll need to use fastboot, which is provided in the CF-Auto-Root zip file, and also available standalone and packaged with lots of other software. It's part of the Android SDK Tools / Platform Tools, which can be installed on Windows, OSX, or Linux. Note: If you've installed a custom ROM or kernel on top of rooting, you'll want to flash the necessary ...


8

Yes. You can unroot your phone. Use the method that GUI app (SuperSU, Superuser etc.) you use offer you to do it. No. It won't bring those apps back. Rooting is just a process of adding a binary in the /system partition that will let the apps approved by the GUI app execute commands as the root user, a user that is not an object to the standard rules ...


8

Varies as per OEM Most devices need bootloader to be unlocked before rooting. OEMs like Motorola insist on a formal request to be made on their website for obtaining boot loader unlock code. The moment you make the request, your warranty is void whether you unlocked the bootloader / rooted or not Edit: Since you own a Motorola device, more details When ...


7

You can use the adb shell command to check if the phone is rooted. Execute adb shell su and if the phone is rooted a root shell will be opened. If it's not rooted you will get a su: not found error message.


6

As sparx said, depending on how you rooted, you can "unroot" with an app if you only rooted your device and did nothing else. If you modified android, by say, removing some bloatware, or flashed another rom on your device, then you will need to use something like Kies, ODIN or Heimdall to flash back the stock ROM. Flashing back the stock ROM can replace ...


5

Technically, you don't need root if you have an unlocked bootloader. Even if it is locked, you don't need root, you just need an exploit to change the recovery to install CM9/CM10. Usually, the first thing that people do when an exploit is identified is "root" the device but flashing a different recovery and flashing a different ROM is also possible. Root ...


5

Absolutely. Well...almost. Just make sure you set the partition from rewritable to read-only once you're "unrooted". However, once you are unrooted, binaries like su and the SuperUser apk will in all probability removed, so you will in effect be dropped to a lower privilege level. This will have the side-effect of having the apps installed in the system ...


4

On request by OP, some details from chat: Good question, but hard to answer: there are a few more things to consider. it's not just "app based versus USB" – and even your "Difficulty in unrooting" is not necessarily the fault of "app based" in general, but rather that of a specific app causing that difficulty. From a security point of view: if there's an ...


4

There are a few advantages to rooting using the official process. It's officially supported on many phones. This means you can use a process that's documented by the manufacturer, and tools from an official source, or a trustworthy third party (CWM or TWRP), instead of having to run a tool that you got from some dodgy website. Because it's officially ...


4

You cannot install an OTA update on rooted device because SuperSU changes some statement in install-recovery.sh to run itself on boot. To install OTA you need to install factory image available at https://developers.google.com/android/nexus/images?hl=en If you dont want to loose your apps and data. Simply edit the script flash-all.bat and remove -w ...


4

From your build version OnePlus2-userdebug 7.1.2 NJH47F b4eb8634d4 , one can easily say that you are using a rooted build. userdebug like "user" but with root access and debuggability; preferred for debugging For more info about build type see this In this case any root hide app will not work. You can try to edit build name along with root hide.


3

If all else fails, you can flash those images in Fastboot. Remember to make a Nandroid and back it up somewhere safe - this will wipe your device. If you're on Windows or OSX, you'll need to install Fastboot through the Android SDK. It's part of the "Platform Tools" package. If you're on Linux, you can usually install fastboot through your package manager. ...


3

Is background data enabled? You can enable it in Settings->Accounts and Sync->Background Data or System Settings->Data Use->Menu Button->Auto-sync data checked.


3

I could have found the solution by myself. Not sure because I haven't tested it yet. For the backup/restore: Titanium Backup (tutorial) For the downgrade/unroot thing: first I could restore Acer's original recovery via Acer recovery installer, then I could downgrade to HC3.0.1 with this I'll give it a try It works perfectly!!!


3

If you install a completely original ROM for the device, it will be unrooted. flashing the correct Stock ROM for your device will revert it back to its original factory state. Remember to Wipe both the Cache and Data when you flash. in the post you linked it also says: Notice: These are NOT rooted, and contain radio/hboot rom updates


3

What does Flashtool do? Your CPU is made by a chinese company called MediaTek and they have released a tool to flash stuff on devices that use their chip called SP Flashtool. So this tool does what it says. It flashes data onto your phone, and where and what data is flashed is determined by the scatter file your provide(where) and the files you open in the ...


3

Thanks to AndrewT who posted a link on chat, having this research paper as a refernce in one of the answers. This answer is entirely based on the this paper (May 2015) and highlights common user understandable aspects ( it has a lot of security related material for those interested) What are the pros and cons apart from above? If a device has both ...


3

Given this link about mount's output, it is at least confirmed that system partition is mounted in read-write mode, so we can exclude that from the list of possibilities that may be restricting rm from deletion. Plus, the error would be different too. Since you're running the command with superuser privilege, different file owner or group owner of that su ...


3

Firstly let me clarify something. Being rooted is not a binary situation where you are either rooted or not rooted. Process of rooting is adding custom binaries to system partition. These binaries, depending on the way they are coded, can answer suid calls from apps so those apps can have the right to execute orders not with their own UID but with the UID 0 ...


3

I, as a programmer, will try to describe how the root is determined on the user's device. Programmers should check some signs on your software which definitely show "is your device rooted" or not. For example: I wrote a sample app which checks a few signs in user's device. You can see here(my repository). To be honest, I would not want my answer considered ...


3

First of all, tweaking that 16 digit Android ID doesn't require root access. You can change that ID using ADB alone. Since Android 5.0, this should work just fine. adb shell settings get secure android_id # returns the current Android ID adb shell settings put secure android_id YOUR-16-DIGIT-ID # to change the ID with your new 16 digit ID ...


2

You've got to do 2 things: First, download the S-ON tool from unrevoked's site and run it according to the instructions. The main thing to keep on top of is the radio compatibility, particularly if you've flashed any of the Evo's radios to your Incredible. Once you're back to S-ON, flash the latest RUU. Right now, it's 4.08.605.2. This will replace the ...


2

The short answer is yes. You should make sure your bootloader is locked by executing fastboot oem lock in your command line while your device is in fastboot (Home + Power + Volume+ for your specific device). Once your bootloader is locked it will be as if you never rooted your device. Once this is all done, you will regain your warranty which would otherwise ...


2

First, there is no such thing as a "full copy" of the system stored anywhere on the device, as it is with the Windows recovery partition you describe. Neither is there a "program which reinstalls the android operating system from scratch" stored on the device, so you could back that up (installation is always done via rom-flashing, which takes care of itself)...


2

You will need to flash back to the stock kernel as files linked on that site will only apply to a 'stock' system partition. You should be able to flash the file via TWRP by selecting it (I presume you've tried this as you said that it gave you an error). To flash back to the stock kernel you will need to find the stock kernel image (ideally you would have a ...


2

As I understand it, if you root your Z2 by unlocking the bootloader via Sony's official method, it will permanently blow away the phone's DRM keys. If you root your Z2 via a non-Sony-sanctioned exploit, you can back up the partition with the DRM keys first & can theoretically restore it at some later time (no hard guarantees, but at least it's a ...


2

On a rooted device, you can use BootUnlocker to re-lock the bootloader without using fastboot. You can also use it to unlock the bootloader again without wiping data. I use it to keep my bootloader locked most of the time, but unlock it prior to installing a system update or doing anything else that might require re-rooting via fastboot flash.


2

No. Instead you may lose your root access in turn, because some system settings go back to default when updating a device, which will probably include your superuser. Your personal data and installed apps will not be affected.


2

It is not built into Android, but is built into the bootloader. Not all Android devices have it. As said by @GiantTree, the easiest way is to boot into the bootloader and checking the screen output. Asus devices in general, don't have any such counter. Samsung uses a flash counter or the Knox counter, which is triggered when any changes are made to the ...


2

If it's rooted, leave it be. It's very unlikely for the S4 to receive many (if any) more Android OS updates officially since it's now a couple of generations old. I use a rooted S4 myself, and love the fact that I can remove bloatware at will and make backups of everything. With that being said, some more info from your device might help us direct you to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible