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25

On my Android 7 and 8 devices: adb shell settings put global http_proxy <address>:<port> Seems the setting is lost at reboot, however.


11

I have a Galaxy S4 and use ConnectBot to connect to my SSH server and setup a port forward via the client to port 8080. Then setup Firefox to use the SOCKS proxy by just going to About:Config and entering the following: network.proxy.socks: 127.0.0.1 network.proxy.socks_port: 8080 (or whatever port you chose to forward in ConnectBot) network.proxy....


9

Long tap on the network you want to configure. Then select 'modify network'. Scroll down and check ' show advanced settings'


9

The wifi proxy settings are still configured under the advanced options for your wifi network. The reason you can't find them is just bad Android UX. They're in a scrollable area that doesn't look scrollable (it looks like it just says 'metered'). If you try scrolling down in the wifi settings window you'll see it immediately.


8

Your http://xxx.com/proxy.pac is not a proxy server, it is the address to a proxy automatic configuration (PAC) file. A PAC file contains a Javascript function that determines which proxy address to use and/or whether you're allowed to go direct when connecting to a particular URL. ProxyDroid (requires root) claims to support proxy configuration using PAC ...


6

The other answers are way out of date. BlueStacks installations now includes a command-line utility HD-ConfigHttpProxy.exe to setup a proxy connection. I can't find documentation for this utility anywhere but it's pretty basic: Using BlueStacks with a Proxy Server Open BlueStacks. (It has to be open before running the utiity) Open a Windows command prompt....


6

My apologies, I just found it. For the benefit of those who have the same problem: It should apply to the other Galaxy Tab 2 models, too.


6

This solution worked for me. Just enter the following command in a terminal (change PROXYIP:PROXYPORT ) iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -o eth0 -p tcp --dport 80 -j DNAT --to PROXYIP:PROXYPORT Source: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/android-x86/XfIRyHQ5nmk I had too tried all your commands without success. I was stuck behind a proxy trying to setup ...


6

Servers Ultimate is an advanced app for turning your phone into a server. By the same developer, Proxy Server offers a more basic and solely "Proxy Server based" approach. As stated on its description: Run your own Proxy Server on your device! The app can handle HTTP and HTTPS protocols and GET/POST requests. You can even set the app to forward all ...


6

If you're just interested in setting a proxy up over your Wifi, you can do that with Servers Ultimate quite easily, but I don't know why anyone would really want to do that. A much more useful option is to use mobile data, but as @Kevin said you're going to hit a lot of headaches, namely at the ISP level (Verizon, AT&T, etc). Chances are you won't get ...


5

For GSM devices, as far as I know, the proxy settings for your mobile data connection are defined in the Access Point Name (APN). Go to Settings > Wireless and Networks > More > Mobile Networks > Access Point Names > [Your data APN] (your device's menu may differ slightly). Check the Proxy field - it's possible this got modified somehow. Might ...


5

As pointed out by Al's comment above, it's not a question of which browser does support it, but rather of how to enable it. And as Sachin's comment suggests, available solutions depend on whether your device is rooted (more and better possibilities) or not. non-rooted devices As long as it's for the browser only, there are multiple easy solutions. So does e....


5

on master device: Configure wifi proxy manually adb pull /data/misc/wifi/ipconfig.txt on second device: adb shell svc wifi disable adb push ipconfig.txt /data/misc/wifi/ipconfig.txt adb shell svc wifi enable


4

According to Bluestack employee Deepika Sharma: Currently, we do not support proxy settings in BlueStacks App Player but will definitely consider it in our future release. This information came from their help forum thread: No network access behind a proxy. Alex Guerrieri answered stating that it was able to workaround this issue uising the application ...


4

If you have cleared your Google Service Framework data to receive the update, it will change your device ID that Google uses to recognise your device. This also affects the tokens used by some apps (i.e. Google Now, Google Search, Chrome) and they won't connect to the Google servers properly and refuse to work for a while (this was like 24~48 hours for me, ...


4

It seems to be a known "feature" if you use Kaspersky Internet Security: http://forum.kaspersky.com/index.php?s=8ffe1c0b8684d5bd3d1353f0d074f528&showtopic=260035 However, as you can see in the link above, it comes with a few issues. Disabling the 'web protection' component seems to do the trick.


4

There are several proxy apps available to accomplish something like that. Though most of them require root access to the device, not all do (I have not tested any of them, so I cannot tell in detail). However, a different approach might be checking into VPN apps, as that's pretty much what you targeting: a Virtual Private Network, where your server acts as ...


4

Just disable captive portal detection. In the terminal, or in adb shell, issue the command settings put global captive_portal_detection_enabled 0 and reboot.


3

By default, as soon as WiFi gets connected, the mobile network shuts down -- so you cannot use both simultaneously. Which means: no, even a proxy allowing for exceptions would not do, as the other network simply is no longer available. Quoting from CyanogenMod Tracker: Each time you activate WiFi you'll lose 3g connection. That's normal behaviour of ...


3

To modify the proxy settings in Android 4 and Samsung Galaxy you should do this: Go to Settings / Wifi. Long-click on your network and select Modify network. Scroll down to Show advanced options which should show you the proxy options.


3

require root for some reason It requires root because the global proxy setting is a secure system settings; on nonrooted devices, only system apps (like the Settings app) can modify secure system settings. Imagine if just any app can modify your global proxy setting, you can inadvertantly be redirecting all your internet traffics to some shady server ...


3

As stated by Lie Ryan's answer, the proxy.pac file is a javascript file. In the Proxy Settings on your Android, you can only enter the address, port number, and sometimes a username and password. What you can do is either ask your SysAdmin for the Proxy Server and Port Number, or just look at the file yourself. On a system that's already on the network, ...


3

This question is a near duplicate of questions like this and this, and closely related to this and this. In fact it can be better explained by a developer, but since it keeps on appearing again and again with slightly different situations, I'll try to explain what I know with some unnecessary details to make the picture clear from a broader perspective. In ...


3

The link you have provided is not setting up SOCKS but a transparent proxy i.e. it takes TCP/UDP traffic and SOCKSify it before sending through shadowsocks tunnel. But you need to make your traffic SOCKS-aware before directing towards SOCKS proxy. Either configure individual apps (which have built-in support for SOCKS) or enforce proxy system-wide ...


2

I see this blog post explaining how to configure APN settings to browse through a proxy. At first, I could not believe that the APN mentioned (as TelKila) in the post will be available in my emulator. But to my surprise I find a APN is available though with a different name (as T-Mobile US). Since I do not have a proxy server environment, I could not ...


2

Should this question stay afloat: I recently created a VPN tunnel from my Android devices to my home Win7 PC and it was much easier than I thought. I'm running Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean), but this setup also worked with 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) and should work with other versions too. First, I had to find a way to create a VPN server. OpenVPN looked awesome ...


2

Short answer: No, proxy apps available on the playstore all need root (to my knowledge). But you can use the native proxy -- even with Android 2.1. Longer answer: As Liam wrote in his answer, an explicit proxy requires kernel level access. But Android has a native proxy built in. Before Android 4.x, its settings were simply hidden. So all you need is access ...


2

Simple answer: No. Long answer: No, as these app use a native binary installed onto the system to reroute data through the proxy. This is done at kernel level (actually it's done using the terminal commands, but it is done at kernel level), because of this root access is needed. There are 0 apps that allow you to use a proxy without rooting first. Android ...


2

Did you switch from "Mobile data" to "WLAN" (also "Wifi" or "Wi-Fi" on SAMSUNG) last time for surfing in internet? If yes, then try this! Sometimes when you enable "WLAN" before disabling "Mobile data" (top line, near the battery-charge-state or the current-date/time) the proxy settings for GSM will stay and be used for you WLAN! All you need to do is: ...


2

Looking at this CyanogenMod source code (which, according to the file history, does not actually have any CyanogenMod-specific changes), I see that the initial dot in proxy bypass list elements is just ignored, and an initial wildcard is implied — that is, you can write either example.com or .example.com in the list, and this entry will match example.com, a....


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