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3

I figured them out thanks to here and here. GSM is 2G (on GSM networks) WCDMA is 3G (HSPA) CDMA is 2G (on CDMA networks) EvDo is 3G (on CDMA networks) TD-SCDMA is 3G (UMTS) LTE is 4G (LTE) This PDF (page 16) explains the evolution of the different technologies. Warning: A lot of this terminology is conflated (e.g. "CDMA" can refer to both the channel ...


3

No its not. If i had a penny for every time i'd been asked this question, or answered a similar question i'd be very rich by now :-) You as a user, CAN get your devices cell tower info, showing which tower id your connected to, but the only people who know that same info of the person placing a call to you are the engineers in the network operations ...


3

If you get a device working on a specific carrier or not depends on the following factors: cellular standards and frequency bands artificial locks on the device and sometimes willingness of the carrier First, check what your future carrier and phone have. For carrier networks and frequencies Wikipedia is the most complete source I know: http://en....


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LTE Discovery app tells this for 4G/LTE.


3

There are two levels of technical reason why this wouldn't work. Not all mobile phones allow the software to control the audio that gets sent over a voice call: the microphone feeds directly into the cell radio. This is the same reason that apps to record calls or play sound over calls don't work on every phone. GSM lossily compresses the sound signal using ...


3

It depends on your carrier's technology. According to Wikipedia all the encryption used in GSM (A5/1, A5/2 and A5/3) have been cracked (albeit some are more difficult to decrypt than others). A5/2, the least secure of these, is no longer in any GSM-related standards (and newer phones shouldn't implement it). A5/3 has not been decrypted in 3G, but people have ...


2

This is not accurate at all, although network based positioning in a very congested urban area can be accurate down to a sub-100m radius with a sufficient concentration of cell sites, in most cases of suburban areas it is more like 1-2km radius at best, in rural areas can be in excess of 10km, and in some areas where cell sites maybe 30km+ a part and none or ...


2

Yes, it can. GSM and later phone protocols automatically adjust the phone's transmit power according to the strength of the signal it gets from the cell tower. It's just like how, if you're talking to someone and you can't hear them very well (because they're a long way away, or in a noisy environment), you'll tend to talk louder or shout, but if you can ...


2

Had the same problem. Turned out that the default SMS app didn't have the phone number entered in the app's settings (in the SMS app click the 3 dots, then Settings then Advanced, then Phone number). Once the phone's number was added - text (both send and received instantly started working). Hope this helps others!


2

After installing another generic SMS app and seeing it was receiving and sending SMSs, I uninstalled it and opened the official SMS app and it worked. It makes no sense but I'm posting here to help. And yes, the official SMS app was setted as the default SMS app AND had SMS permissions.


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This is the JP/TW variant of ZenFone 3 Max - detailed specs here. From the listed LTE bands, it's missing the crucial Band 20 (wide coverage) for European countries and main bands for major carriers in the US. You will likely get less-than-stellar LTE coverage out of the device as a result. 3G will still work and likely suffice for most use cases.


1

I'm just wondering which one, locked or unlocked, will provide me with the easiest process when setting up the S5- or whether there'll be a difference. If you're buying the phone from the same carrier that you will be using the phone with, there's no difference to you. The only thing that makes set-up hard is if you buy a locked phone from one carrier to ...


1

First I would recommend using a VPN service to prevent your ISP from inferring your avoidance of the ban by sniffing your internet traffic. It would be best to pay for one, as free VPN services collect and sell your personality data. More about how your ISP can tell if you are tethering. You will have two classes of options: rooted or non-root. Non-root ...


1

June Fabrics PDA Software Support responded: You can try this and see if it works: 1. Install PdaNet 5.1 on both your Moto E and Moto X 2. On the Moto E open PdaNet and activate "WiFi Direct Hotspot" 3. On the Moto X open PdaNet and tap "Connect to a PdaNet Hotspot", See if the two can establish connection. This suggests that this software, if added to ...


1

Okay, here's what I can gather... There should be no real loss of capability if you move to AT&T. While AT&T does not advertise LTE Band 8 capability on its S5s, Band 8 is largely used in South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan; unless you travel to those places, it shouldn't be a problem. I would, however, check AT&T's coverage map to be certain. T-...


1

The following is no complete solution, but at least a work-around, avoiding a long reboot: There are apps like Quick Boot (others have things like "fast reboot" and the like in their names/descriptions). Other suggested by those names, they do not really reboot your device, but simply restart the system server (for details, please take a look at Can ...


1

You are right in that it theoretically should be possible to make the switch without dropping the signal, but unfortunately we users and even CM developers can do very little to change that. The only thing the ROM does is tell the radio to switch from one mode to another, it's up to the radio's firmware to decide how to make the change. These firmwares are ...


1

So here is the way I solved it: After discovering the right place to edit the preferred network mode I tested to change it: adb shell settings put global preferred_network_mode 1 adb shell settings put global preferred_network_mode1 1 adb shell settings put global preferred_network_mode2456921 1 adb shell stop ril-daemon adb shell start ril-daemon The ...


1

Use OpenSignal to determine if your area actually does have 3G coverage from T-Mobile. I suspect that your area does not, and that is why you are not getting 3G service from T-Mobile. If you do get 3G coverage in your area, removing your SIM card and inserting it back into your phone will likely do the trick.


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Off topic but not by much ... I have a Galaxy S7 Duos. My SIM 1 is T-Mobile set to "Auto" band (LTE/W-CDMA/GSM), and my SIM 2 is a foreign SIM that roams on the AT&T network here in the US - set to (GSM Only). As OP said, their phone (and most dual-SIM phones that I'm aware of) only allow 3G/4G to run on ONE SIM, and the other SIM has to use GSM. That'...


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No, OnePlus 2 is not any different. In fact, users on the forum report that the dual SIM functionality apparently requires the presence of a 2G GSM network. https://forums.oneplus.net/threads/dual-lte.328953/page-2 I have the OnePlus 2 (A2005) and am using it in Canada. SIM 1 on Telus (4G/LTE) and SIM 2 on Wind. When I want to use data on Wind, it ...


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When you turn on your device, start adb shell and enter stop service rild. This would stop the RILD service and you can then use your phone for other purposes. However, on restart, the service would start again. For that, you need to edit your init.rc file. Just delete the lines that are starting the RILD service and then the RIL would not be a part of the ...


1

Solution was to restore a backup of /efs and write a backup of the modem firmware to /dev/block/mmcblk0p10, this device file may be different on a different deivce though. But on my N7100 it worked.


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*#*#7262626#*#* – Perform a field test *#2263# - If previous doesn't work. Sadly, Samsung used to provide field test display by entering codes in keypad. However, from Galaxy S3 onward, the service mode *#*#197328640#*#* was disabled. Only *#0011# is still available. The worst is that even the Android default testing info *#*#4636#*#* was disabled as well. ...


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